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Full text of "Virginia Beach sun"

Slfj^t. 



JOEL SMITH 



48th Ymt No. 18 



Circulation 22^5 




SERIALS SPCTtO?! 
YA STATE LIBRARY 
RICHMOND VA 23219 




Wednesday, May 1, 1974 



City of Virginia Baoch. Va. 



Copyrtaht 1974 
a*«ch PublltMng Corp. 



15 cents 






^¥ 



Plans set 
forparade 

Maj. Gen. John R. McGiffert 11 wiU be Grand Marshal 
of the Armed Fwces Day parade in Virginia Beach May 
18. Gea McGiffert is dqmty chief «rf staff, Resource 
Mana^ntent, U.S.A. Training and Doctrine Command, 
Ft. Monroe, Va. 

The theme <rf this year's Armed Fwces Day celebration 
is "American Forces-Vigilant, Vital, Volunteer". Other 
events in addition to the parade include open house with 
various displays and demonstrations at Ft. Story and 
Naval installations at Little Creek, Dam Neck and 
Oceana. 

Tlie parade will contain approximately 125 units 
representing various military installations, high schools 
and civic and fraternal organizations. The parade will 
begin at 10 a.m. at lOth Street and proceed up Atlantic 
Avenue to Slat Street (LaskinRoad) where the parade will 
disband. 

Each of Uie sbc high schools in the city has nominated a 
candidate for the title of "Miss Armed Fwces 1974". Her 
name will be announced during the parade as her float 
appnnches the reviewing stand at 2Sth Street and 
Atlantic Avemie. 



SUNBEAMS 



"The Sun covers high school sports 
better tfian eny deily newspaper could."- 
G.M., Kempsville 

"I can relate to your newspaper be- 
ceuse, to me, it r^rasents Virginia 



BM6h.''-J.H., Princess Anne 

"Thanks for another wonderful paper. 
TTie Sun makes my week^-W-R., 
Bayside 

for home delivery phone 486-3430 



Sun selects 
candidates 
for council 

—Page A-2 

KeHam wins 
golf tourney 

by six strokes 

—Page AS 



ELECTION DAY is Tuesday for the 
Virginia Beach Cily Council race. No 
matter what borough they live in, 
roistered voters may vote for one 
candidate in each of four boroi^h races 
(Lynnhaven, Kempsville, Bayside and 
Pungo) and for two candidates in tte at- 
lai^e race, PoUs will be open from 6 a.m. to 
7 p.m. Tiwsday. 

BLOOD DONORS are asked to give blood 
Monday when the Red Cross BloodmobUe 
visits tiie Vii^ia Beach campus of 
Tidewater Community Collie at Camp 
Pendleton, the college biology club is 
sponsoring the blood drive. 

"THE CHIEF JUSTICE, Jotei lilarshall," 
is a symi^ionic poem yMch will hi^ilight 
the Virginis*^^ Beach Civic Chorus Spring 
Concert Sunday (3 p.m.) and Monday (8 
p.m.) at Plaza Junior High School. The 
chorus will pCTform with the Armed Forces 
School of Music C(mcert Band from the 
Naval Amphibious Base, little Creek . . . 
PageB-1. 



Inside 



T«w) sectkMtt 20 jpag^s 

aaislfled B^ 

Commant A-2 

^^^Ulfl •*•■•«•■■•■■■•«•■■•■•••«••••••«•••••*••■■•••" "■* 

i^denifm .— B^ 

Ufo^yles B-1 to B-3 

IMI Eflata —• B-^ 




Fleming stays 
but must sell 



Ship s^ scarce 



th^e's water, waier evei^wherc 
but not a sUp te diick In at most of 
the marinas in tbe city. The three 
boats in the foreground seem to be 
waiting thefa' turn to dock. The 



^rtmm of crowded Lynnhaven 
Wato-way Marina h from the top 
of Long Creek BrMge «i Chfeat 
Neck 'Road. (Sun photo by Rod 
Mamf) 



By LINDA MILLER 
Sun Staff Writer 

Community Services Director W.W. 
Fleming, whose business vmture with a 
coiuiultant oi a local engineering firm 
came unter scrutiny last week, will be 
allowed to dissolve his partnership and 
remain employed by the City of Virginia 
Beach. 

(Questions arose when it became 
known that Mr. Fleming was part owner 
of a land pared in Chesapeake «dth 
Douglas Talbot, a member of Talbot, 
Wermers and Associates, a local 
engineering firm which frequently does 
business in Virginia Beach. It was 
believed that Mr. Fleming's association 
with Mr. Talbot might conflict with his 
position as Community Services 
Director, since that city department 
reviews, and approves or disapproves, 
site plans for city construction, including 
UKwe of Mr. Talbot's firm. 

In a statement Monday, aty Manager 
Roger Scott told the Virginia Beach City 
Council that in his opinion. 'There 
would be no conflict of interest in an 
employe of ^ city owning and 
developing (property outside the cor- 
porate limits of Virginia Beach if it did 
not involve anyone diring business 
directly with the City of Virginia Beaich 
and did not interfere with Uie employe's 
day-to-day vwark." 

MR. SCOTT SAID he had examined 
"documented evidence" cmiceming Uf- 
Fleming's agreements wtth Mr, Tiiot 
and that commitnMits topirehaMflle 
lOO-acre oareel in Chesapeake were 
made at a time wtwn Mr. Fleming was 
not employed by the City of Virginia 
Beach. He adtted tiut the dealii^ had 
' not interfered with Mr. Fleming's 



service to the city and "neither do I find 
any indication that Mr. Fleming has 
granted to Mr. Talbot or his firm any 
consideration or advantage that is not 
available to any other party or ffarm 
dealing with the City of Virginia Beach." 

However, Mr. Scott told the Council 
that Mr. Fleming's association with Mr. 
Talbot as a partner of Wildwood 
Associates is in conflict with the Oty 
Code of Ethics. Ttte code states m part 
that "no employe. . .shall oigage in any 
bmlness or transaction or shall have a 
financial or other personal taiterest, 
drect or indirect, which is incompatilde 
with the proper discharge of his official 
duties in the ptd>lic interest or would 
tend to impair his independence of 
judgment or action in the performance 
of his offtelal duUes." 

MR. FLEMING SAID Moiulay he mtUI 
sell his share of the land holding to Mr. 
Talbot. Mr. Scott is to report back to the 
Council when the sales transaction is 
completed. 

An FBI investigation of bribery 
charges in connection with city sewer 
{H*ojM:ts continues in the Commimity 
Servtees Department. Mr. Scott is also 
conducting his own investtgation of 
administrative methods that could be 
altered in the future if the charges are 
vaUd. He dMlines to comment on dther 
investigationunttl the FBI completesito 

inqufary. 

Another city official said he thinks 
"there is nothing to it (the bribery 
dprge)". He said ttie numbw- of checks 
tiiveity has m te instattitlon dw^m 
prajeds would prevent any wrot^di^ 
from occurring and attributes the 
bribery charges to a "disgruntled 
contractor who probably called the FBI 
complaii^g." 



Vommunlication 



If you've been waiting to ride one of 
the buses in the city's expanded transit 
system to w(»k today, you'd best find an 
alternate source of transportation. 
Beach buses tenatively scheduled to roll 
today, now will prdjably not be on the 
roads until June. 

The Virginia Beach City Council was 
to sign the final contracts for bus service 
MotKlay, and the Norfolk City Council 
was to follow suit at tlieir meeting 
Tuesday, ^t Norfolk threw a wrench 
into the works. 

aty.Managw Roger Scott told the 
Beach -CouncifMonday that restoraticm 



Sei^horepkms 



of ttK bus service in Virginia Beach now 
rested in t^ie hands (rf Norfolk. And 
Norfolk had given Beach officials no 
indication of whether they would ap- 
prove the contract. Mr. Scott said he had 
"no idea" why Norfolk had not 
rejsponded. 

THE TWO CITIES have been working 
with Norfolk's Tidewater Metro Traiwit 
Co. (TMT), and the Tidewater Tran- 
sportation District ConTmission for 
weeks to re-establish and expand bus 
service in Virginia Beach. The Beach 
Council had agreed to unda*write Ute 



costs of TMT's servk:e in Virginia Beach 
up to about $165,000. 

Norfolk (rfficials ve saying a com- 
muidcatim gap between the two cities 
caused the delay of the bus project. Iliey 
say they are irat in dtoagreement with 
the bus system but with the way plans 
have been handled. Norfolk offteials 
may in-esent an alternate contract to the 
one proposed by the Beach. 

The Bw:h will have mne time to 
w>rk out details fw an experimental bus 
route on Shore Drive. Beach coimcilmen 
said th^ had received numerous pb<me 
calls over the detetion <rf service along 



Snatfi I^ive in the proposals for the 
eiquuided bus system. The Shore IMve 
bus service, however, ii^xpected to be 
limited. 

Other revisions so far in the proposed 
system include buses to start service at 
87th Street instead of 8Ut Street at the 
beach; a bus to travel along ^ore Drive 
to Diamond Swings Road to North- 
ampton Boulevard, rather than via 
Jack Frost Road to Northampton 
Boulevard; and two bt»« each in the 
morning and afternoon instead of one to 
Norfolk Naval Base. 



Park addition scheduled 



A conmissioner for ttae State 
Division of Farits tcdd the 
Virginia Beach City Council 
Monday that city residents 
could expect to see 
improvements in conditions at 
Seashore State Pait during the 
*tie3(Fy«ir. 

The Council met in closed 
session with Ben Bolai of the 
State Division of Parks Monday 
to disran plato for the False 
Cape and Seashore State Parks. 
Mr. Bolen said the state is 
working to provide more public 
access to the bay beach in 
Seashore State Park. It is hoped 
that the campgrounds in tbe 
pait, which are now heavily 
used in tt^ siunm^ months, 
can be rdocated to allow all of 
ttie be»:h area bow dominated 
by campra? to be opened iq> f^ 
publk use. Accordii^ to one 
raincUman, Mr. B(4m tdd Ute 
CouMil ttiat wiU> tiie adAtioo of 
new camppounds in the area, 
the state believed the 
ampgraund at Seashore State 
Paik would no limger be 
oeceuary. % 

Other impiovenents fn* the 
park to be^ sometime during 
Hm year iachide more bttce 
trails. cMetrycthn ef a vwtors' 
ceBter. ttw buikUag of ova-looks 
and a poirible railway out to Uw 
nature tntt f ms the parkli« 

area. 
Mr. Mm ako reported QB fte 

prqgTMi b^ng n«de tomrd 
ertabWintartatepaifcrtFAe 
CKgt, Mott flf Baek B19. Tbe 
Mate akMKi^ las a rcfcrt on tae 
area from die Vlrftata iBsMita 
«ilbrteS<^K^ and te ftaa 



of Howard, Needles, Ammen 
and iesneadatl has been hired 
to comfaKt an access study «if 
the park. There has been much 
controvert over the opening of 




dosed 
councH 

n* Vlr^ite Beach City 
CoMcO mA MMday far 31 
mlBBies to closed scsilai. 
open to Mither tae pabHc 
BM- the press. The a^aAi 
Hsied a "l^r' wa^Vm tM 
a "yertsaael" m^um Im 
diseasstw. The CmicU 
als« heH a special elesel 
seiAa at te refaeat el U« 
^•le DIvUea af Parks 
wMehlastoda aitaates. la 
It M^4i s« far Uris 
^ar, tae Caai^ Nm aet 
r<r riae kam aai e^t 
aOMtos behtaA elas^ 



Back Bay WlkUife refuge for 
automobile traffic to the state 
park. City officials say sonM 
sOTt of rail system will probably 
be constructed for paik access. 



Hotline 
helpers 
needed 



The Virginia Bead) (tatrcach 
Clink is seeking vokinteers to 
man the clinic's telephone 
hotUm. 



The clhdc wiU start an ^A- 
wed( course to tndn telephoiie 
vdunteers May 16. The emmt 
will omcailrate on providii^ 
necessary skills for crisis 
intervention. Conducting the 
course will be qualified 
profesdoaak and monbcn of 
tedl^stefl. 



V(4unteers are asked to 
dimate between four and ei^ 
imsi al tfrae pa: week to 
manning tte hotline. T^ 
hodiaeopgHwfrointa.m. to 1 
a.0L we<m days a week. 

Anyone who would like to 
votateer time to ariud to eall 
flw«UAat' 



AIMED AT YOUm 

Bar members to speak 
for Law Day campaign 



TtM^Vir^ta Beach Bar Association has 
undertaken a jMiaive public Infongatfon 
campaign to iirarm reaidrats about the^, 
ovsCTvance and principles of Uw D^ 
cekbrated naUonaUy today. 

The AttooSl Law Day ofaaemnce is aimed 
at young people with Uw theme, "Young 
Amarfca, hmd the Way." 

Ute young people erf today will be the 
leaden <f Am^ica^by tbe year 2000, 
explained Donaki Ctaik. diairman of tbe Uw 
m^ committee of tte local Bar AModadoe. 

"With Watergate and die rising CrinM rate, 
m on^ to be teaching the kids in schod 
wtet the law-making mechanism and the 
Judicial process is aU about," Mr. Clark sakl. 

PAST LAW DAY observancM have 
OHMlly been in the form of mode trtato at 
Khods, be said. This year, the Bar 
Assodatioo wanted to do sooMtfatag differmt 
for Uw Day to extmd the day past the 
tradUooal aoe4ay cetebraUon. 

"Wtet's tsilqae about our Law Day mt 
y«ar is diat «« have deserted fron (he one- 
day obaavance," he sidd. 

It was Mr. Clait's idM to provide tpeaken 
from the ISO membCTt of the local Bar 
i^aedatiQa to ai^ interested group. Hie 
tptikK* will ^cuas Law Day, w^ 
AmwieaM need to kaow mere about te law 
ud how ^fvemncBt oparataa. 

It kkk eff te Uw tey ca i^ » ^ Mr. 
Oaik aart lettsn to aU darg^nea to Vto^la 
Beadi aaUng thm to ladui* WsnaatlaB 
abort U w Itay la tefr bwmbs «r 
tartractfsoal propam. 



HE ALSO inftrmed te deify tet 
qwakmi from te bar assodatiOQ were 
available to addrMS arqr dnirdi puup. 

Thai letten w»e sent to te presidents (rf 
moat of te civic leagues in te dty also 
offolng bar nsodation members to address 
te lea^e meeUnp. 

PriiM^to of ea(^ of te 49 pid9Uc sdKwIs in 
te dty were soit lettov ofierii^ speakos' 
sorvicM to govemmeirt dasaas or any ottio- 
iirt««ated ciaiaes. In adcMtlon. all hi^ 
schooia recdved eihicatars kiis ca^^^ 
informatlao on ordering fllm strips and ram* 
matCTial b-om te American Bar Association. 

Local boainesses alao have bera aaked to 
(Bsplay te American Bar Assedation's 
ptacard widi te Uw Day youUi Hmm and 
te pinsee, "Help preserve good laws. Hdp 
dwnge bad laws. Hdp make better laws." 

MR. CLARK SAID he had been working on 
te fctfjaroadooal project for a coupte of 
monte and he has had good response from 
kieal poupe wanUng to ue te services of te 

bar nsodadon apMkov. 

He pditted out tet loeid attoraejn do mrt 
have teir own cdefaratkn beotitfe te 
MBual Uw Day is not a "lawyer'a dtay" but 
i^ber a time to 1^ te pubUc learn how te 

law opoatos. 

LMtweckatte newCiroUtCourt builtfBg, 
JudieRobert Wahabpartidpated to a qiadal 
earanoiV wM Msqw nabert CrmimA 
dp^iga predaaB^taB da^patti ted^ M 
Uw D^p UJSJk. to ^nrgnia Baa^ 



^ 



I 



Comment 



Page A-2-Tha Sun-WtodneMay, fMif 1, 1974 



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SAMPLE BALLOT 

FOR 
CITY OF VIRGINU BEACH 

AUTOMIATIC VOTING MACHINE 

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Ctiyside 



ByUadaH/RUei' 



Aland use 




it 9 



for any citizen 



If Vii^iflia Beach City Councilmen f ind rea^tog 
ordinances and city procedure a little boring and 
ikdl, they should cer^jUidy find a bode {uresented to 
tfaem by City Manager Scott last week a refreshing 
ciuu^e. 

Though it's not a murder mystery, "The Use of 
Land, A Otizens' PoUcy Guide to Urban Growth" 
does try to unlock some of the mysteries about 
urban growtti and how to deal with its prt^lems. 
And, dnce growth is Vt» "biggie" issue in the city 
right now, it seems apint^riate that the Council 
should be reading on the matter. 

tliebofric is a task force rq;>ort sponswed by the 
Rockefeller Brothers Fund. (The Task Force on 
Land Use and Urban Growth was created in 1972 by 
the Citizens' Advisory Committee on 
Environmental Quality, a body estaUisbed by 
preadential executive wder in May, 1969.) 

Hie group surveyed the malm* reuortB on land use 
and urban growth from the last five years, examin- 
ed sigm&ant state and nati<«al l^islation and 
conducted studies in Florida, Cotorado, U»g 
Island, N.Y. ami California hi compiling ttie report. 
It offers several interesting ideas on acquiring open 
space, historic inesarvation, adapting old laws to 
fit new values, devel(qmient regudations and 
incoitives, consorvatitm and citizen in-put into the 
pdicy-mAking process. 

All in all, tile botdc is interesting reading fw any 
person ^o is interested in alternatives for land use 
and "uncontroUed growtti." The best tiling about it 
is you dm't have to be a land use couultant or 
expert to understand it 



» o»»Aa*a* 

EACH MAN miEDto open Uie door — but it was. 
locked. After a few taigs on tin door knob, a man 
inside peered out from bdiimi ttie dow to see who it 
was, and thai let each person into the meeting. 

Sounds like sometUng one mi^t expect tosee cm 
late mght television, but it was a Virginia deadi 
Qty Council dos«i meeting with a cwnmissjonar 
frmn flie State Parks Dqutrtmrat. Not only ww tiMr 
door ctoaed, it was locked, and owncil membns 
and dty staff airiving late fw the meeting hi^ to 
wait until Asst. to the aty Manager George llnnes 
opened the door 'bef(»« tiiey could gain 
admittance to tte meeti^. 

Aftnr the meting was ovor.'^^^ral coimcflmai 
saidA^dicfei'tknowwl^tiiemeetii^wascksedln 
fact, some werai't exactly sure w^ th«e ««» a 
mec^. l^rt (rf tiie pnqiarty tiM state is trying to 
acqpdrefwFidseCi^State Park is being cmtested 
hi the eoints, b^ ttiat was not ttie baric itmi for 
(iscuB^m 1^ the meeting. Hie meetii«, aixcvding 
to Mvcral coundlmen, was merely an iqxlate on 
iHiat to bcii« (k»e in SeadKve State Paik ami at 
FstoCape. 

the i^olc "locked?' door routine got a littie 
taumarais after tix (Mr sevoi pawns IrM Uie donr. 
Perii^s next time ttie Comcfl m^ c«tti(ter 
ha^i« all nwnbos kiuidc three times and give a 
secret i^svrard. 




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An editorial: 



Endorsements: Council as a team 



On Tuesday, registered vc^rs of Virginia 
Bes^h are eligible to Ko to the polls and cast 
six votes toward election of four borough and 
two at-large dty councilmeai. If past election 
days are any indication, then apathy will be 
the big winner. Indications are that only a- 
bout 20,000 to 30,000 of the city's 78,466 regis- 
tered voters are expected to turn out (or 
about 25 per cent.) 

Six city councilmen will be elected for a 
four-year period. During those four years, 
they will face protdems which threaten the 
quality of life in Virginia Beach. An immense 
stdtNiriban city with a pq>ulation of well over 
aoo.OOO, Vir^ia Beach operates with no true 
downtown. There is no urban blight, but 
instead nei^b<Hiiood shopping areas. The 
problems here are different from those in 
many other large cities. Water and sewer 
commitmoits need to be filled. Rapid 
population growth, land development and the 
headadies that ac(»mpany tfaem are forcing 
decisions (xi long-term goate. 

The diverse and essentially new problems 
which our local government faces call for a 
aty Council made up of people from a wide 
rai^e of eiqiieriences. Effective solutions will 
come oidy from a team wh(»e members are as 
varied as the problems they encounter. Taken 
first by borough and then at-large, here are six 
persmis we eiKlorse as membo^ dt that team. 

PUNGO - WaterfleU 

Floyd Waterf ield is unopposed in his bid for 
re«iecticm to the Council seat frcxn Pungo 
Borou^. He was first elected in 1970 as a 
member ci the ordinal "Nine for Progress," 
which also included Dr. Clarence Holland, 
Bayskte councilman. Together, they will be 
sufficient to represent the interests of the 
group which have su{^rted ttem. 

BAYSIPE - HoUand 

As a general practitioner, Dr. Holland's 
pceBoace on the team reflects an interest in 
the welfare (tf Beach residents. Water and sew- 
er needs in many sections of the city have 
gone unmet. In Seatack, for instance, one prob- 
lem has been the ability <tf the residents to pay 
fbr initial dty services. Dr. Hdland has pro- 
poBcA that the city institute a graduated sys- 
tem of payments allowing residents to pay ac- 



as"- 



conling to their abiUty. 

Though he voted against the recent GO^y 
moratorium on residential housing 
construction. Dr. IfoUand has indicated his 
support for the long-range goals of the "plan 
for planning." "This," he says "will eliminate 
the frustration of the bulkier, devdoper, real 
estate byestor and the homeowner." 

Dr. Holland, the incumbent, has a long 
histOTy of involvement in government— unlike 
his opponent Gaynette Winter. His father was 
a member of the Virginia legislature, and Dr. 
Holland served as a Senate page when he was 

14. 

KEMPSVILLM-lsden — ^ 

Incumbent Garland Isdell has been on the 
OHincil since November when he was 
appointed to fill the seat vacated by Donald 
Rhodes who was elected to the Virg^ia House 
of Ddegates. Since then he has brought to 
Council the same dedication he showed as a 
member of the Board of Zoning Appeals. 
Ihiring his four years on that Board; Mr. Isdell 
found the time to personally visit sites under 
ctmsideration by the Board. 

As a cmmdlman, he has frequently 
supp(»ted effbrts to control rampant growth 
wlwre city services were not available. Mr. 
Isddl has inropowd that a low interest ban 
fund be established to assist those who live in 
substandard homes to improve their 
residences up to city minimum hoissing 
standards. 

Though his opponent, Dr. Henry McCoy, has 
campaigned on improving CMiucation in 
Virginia Beach, PACE (Political Action 
(Tonunittee on Education) recommendted Mr. 
Isdell for dection. As a member of the team, 
we can expect Mr. Isdell to coi^nue-his 
personal involvement and be readily 
acc^sible to those Iw represoits. 

LYNNHAVEN - Erwht 

The race for the I^nnhaven Borough seat 
has been the most hotly-contested, bieumbent 
F. Reid Ervin has borm the lurunt d 
mmierous attacks by challei^or John Ghriffm. 
Mr. Griffin has charged that Mr. Ervin, a 
contract(X', has connectioi^ with Imilders and 
investors which do not allow him to vote 
without a conflid of interest. 



Forum 




political attack 
titled. 



not to be iden- 



Letters from 
our readers 



Low blow 



Mr: 

In the AprU M teue of Tlie Sun, a 
leUer to ttie editor appeared ae- 
ain« Held &vta tf pt^kd 
"bo^tan." "nw mriter M not hkw 
flie Gonn#e to bai« Ms or be- 
oantM pdrttated. 
Tbte has t»be die lowirt form of 



You should ctnnge the policy of 
yiMjr edtorial pi^e and refuse to 
pubiisti any letter witfiout proper 
identification. 

In closii^, I lave known Reid 
Ervin for many ^an aid his 
{Mimary concern \m be@) and irtiU 
is progressive govemnmit for all 
tte citizens of Virginia Beach. 

Jos^ B.Wood 



IntrMHita 



mrt 

On Af^ ir, Doris Finn^A 
died in I^^hmcNd after a ta% 
illnest. She was the first 
profcaaiwMd cfafth«i's Ulvarian 
in ^t^nta Beac^ Da^ &n- 
Mbded ^eaUy to fl» powth ami 
6evfAagmmt of te Ubrary qn^n 
in ^ Md d cUd^en's mewk^ 
Ste wUl be bert r^Mmbered at the 
Itadior Woods Mm^ fsr tt vna 



Uiore she created the special 
l^ograms fm* the children. She 
served as acting Library IMrector 
Inm Airil 1 until Jtt!» 1, 1970. 

She was an e<hicat(Mr, an in- 
novator an entertaiiMH' and a 
creator. She po^^s^ a fiiw »eme 
of humiH* and a vivid inu^ination, 
was unselfidi, uncmnplaiA^ and 
in shmrt, a deU^tfd poBoi botti to 
taiow as a fri^ and as a fdlow 

Shb estaMished the summer 
reeling program for the dddren, 
built up their book cdtectfan, heU 
ccmtests and svpeniaeA manerous 
other activiti^. 

May this tattor serve as my 
belated tribute to a charmii« lady, 
and a fuw librariui. 



Margaret Ca^s Beda 
FM^ier Oty Liferarlao. Vfa-gUa 

Besch 



L Nrnim tm ht rfUMU m m»^ *«' 
Aidf yma mmrn mid takf^om mmt-, 
hM jwmt kmr. L^mt mt mH^t «0 
tag H> mttt mm^tptr m}^ mt^^iftM m- 
mfmntt Met: Fornm, ^^rii tmi^mm. 



In fact, on votes where Mr. Ervin poten- 
tially had a conflict rf taterest, he has csffe- 
fuUy abstained. One situation which has re- 
cdved particular scrutiny involves Atlantic 
Investments, Inc., d which Mr. Ervm is a 50 
per cent stockholder. In two Coundl votes 
granting use permits to the company for land 
at 11th Street and Atiantic Avenue, Mr. Ervin 
has abstamed. 

Despite charges of associations with 
builders, Mr. Ervin supported the recent 80- 
day moratorium, em^jiadzmg the need for 
dty services to keep pace with growth. The 
Tidewater Builders Assodation, of n^ch Mr. 
Ervin is a member, strongly opposed his 
stand 



In line with his stance on controlled growth, 
Mr. Ervin has called fbr the assignment d 
priorities in the city's Capital Improvements 
Program. like Mr. Isddl, Mi. Ervin has 
pit^XMed a low-cost loan pn^ram f or those 
who cannot 'afford to make extendve hmne 
rq[>airs. He a^o has advocated strict 
enforcement of the dty's minimum housing 
standards, a move which w(Hild eliminate 
much of the housing blight in the dty. 

AT'LARGE-Obamdorf 

and Standhtg 

llie incumbent at-lai^e councilmen, Robert 
Cromwell and Murray Malbon, are botii 
seddng third terms. Thdr absence at 
campaign forums indicate they are out d 
Umk^ witii the general populatimi of Virginia 
Beach, are ccmcenied with old line policies Of 
local ^vernment and unaware d the need for 
urgent sdtitions to problems assodated witt 
rapid growth. 

Tha:e is room on our cmmdl team for 
newcomers Patrick Standing and Meyera 
Obemdnf , who dfer fresh faces, new ideas 
and are eager to serve m an dfective 
government. As a professional planning 
consultant and former dty planning director, 
Mr. I^andin^ is capable of providl^ needed 
experience in dealing with the growtii 
IHtiblem. Ms. Oberndorf, chairman of the 
lUt>rary board, is aware that adviswy groims 
haveinuch to offra* the Council. She can fill the 
void of communication with the residents ami 
overcome the history of non-involvemoit that 
many citizens have come to expect from their 
leaders. 



H#w to svliseribe 




r 



Many of our leadera piefsr «> gM 
ttwir panon^ copiet of The Sun by 
miril. 

If you with Th« &in to be mailad 
waaidy to your home or butinett, mail 
itt tfie coiqwn and lorviGa will begin 
immodiatsly. 

Mtil To: 

Virginia B«ach Sun 

Circulation D«pt. 

138 Roscmont Rd. 

Virginia B«ach, Va. 23452 



Mail The Sun To: 



Addraw 



J ISST 



StalB 



Z^ 



I lYr.lBU 6Moi.$4.tO() 3Mot.^iO(M 



wt ^mo ' 



if 



f 





By 

Donna 

Hendrick 

Oh where 

is The Dome'? 



It's May, the time of Communist celebraticms, the 
arrival oi tourists and the debut of the new phone 
bock. 

"The new telephone book?" you ask. "So what?" 

If ttiis is your reaction, then you have never 
perused pages 590 through S&ZoStbe C&P telephone 
directory (date May, 1973) listing Virginia Beach, 
Norfolk, Portsmouth and Chesapeake. 

Pages 590-592 of my telephone book are dog-eared 
and (tecorated with red, blue and black uniterlines, 
boxes, circles and stars. ^ 

THOSE PAGES, my fellow telephone users, 
contain the listings for "Virginia Beach — City Of," 
which any Virginia Beach newsperson will tell you 
are the numbers we call most frequently. 

The reason there are all those black, blue and red 
marks, stars, circles and boxes, is because it is 
impossible to find anything on Page 590-592, unless 
one has a magnifying glass, a ruler, 20-20 vision and 
the detection abilities of Sherlock Hohnes. 

Say, for instance, you are a relatively new 
resident of Virginia Beach. You have heard about 
an event at "The Dome" or "The Civic Center." 

Deciding to call the Dome, you lo<* under 
Virginia Beach, City Of, for that listing. It doesn't 
exist uncter either "C" for Civic or "D" for Dome. 

IT'S IN THE secdnd column of listings, the 37th 
phone number for the city, under Economic 
Development Department. It's listed as Alan B. 
Shepard Qvic Center, the official name nobody 
uses. 

The trick to finding anything in the city listings is 
to know which department that person or depart- 
ment is in (or under, or affiliated with, unless, of 
course, that person or department is not in a 
department. 

Confusing? You bet it is. 

Try to find the number for Anna Cotton, the city 
registrar. Would you lode under Cotton (if you 
happen to know her name). or voting, or registrar 
or what? 

It's on Page 591 (underlined in black ink in my 
bo<*) under FIRE (which is in big bold letters). It's 
not really under FIRE (although it's physically 
under it) because FIRE is printed all tlje way to the 
left of the column, and "General Registrar" (that's 
Ms. Cotton) is indented about one-sixteenth of an 
incbworei than FIRE. 

> oflWS IS WHEN your ruler and magrafyii^ glass 
come in handy. The main city departments are in 
all capital letters, as in SCHOOL BOARD (which is 
not a city department, but what the heck, we can't 
have everything). 

Under the capital letter listings are divisions of 
those departments, indented about one-eighth of an 
inch, such as "Admin. Offices." Under those 
categories are further breakdowns, such as "Office 
of Div Supt," indented some more. Then under that 
are furtfer breakdowns, indented even more, such 
as "Instrn & Curriculum." 

Using youi' ruler, you can line up all the in- 
dentations to see which department is under what, 
and which is a department all by itself. See, isn't 
that easy? 



REMEMBER WHEN the city started its 
"Hotline" to make it extremely simple for people to 
get information from the city? WeU, back then, and 
even now, directory assistance never heard (rf 
"HoUine." 

This is sui^MJsedly one of the most (if not the 
most) frequently called numbers in the city. This is 
the number to call if you don't know what number to 
call or who can help you. 

The "Hotline" number is in the second column 
of listings as "Information and Services" and that 
listing is listed under GENERAL SERVICES 
DEPARTMENT, although it's really not because 
it's iMrinted all the way to the left of the column, and 
it's in r^ular letters instead of bold or capital 
lGtt6rs 

The listings least difficult to uncterstand are the 
school listings. I don't know why that is, but if you 
want to find Princess Anne Elementary School, it's 
just as simple as it can be to run down the lists oC 
"Schools-Public" and find it on Page 591. 

However, I'm still trying to figure out who does 
what in "Custorial Services" on Witchduck Road. 
"TranspwatilSi'' on Indiana Ave. alsolM me 
putzled, an<^m sure the "Guidance Councilors" at 
IfemiBville Hi^ School wish C&P^new how to 

spell. 

The fim (rf looking up Virginia Beach City listings 
may be all over when the new ^om book com» 
out. Let's hope so. 



The Sun -Wednesday, Mty 1, 1974-ftigc A-J 



foee/ 



by Rod ■aiM 




Listening intently to every word, 
Sharon Bennett gives her undivided 
attention to a City Council candi- 
date who dropped by her office 



one day. Ms. Bennett is office mana- 
ger for Aranyi, Murrell & Associ- 
ates, Virginia Beach architects. 



Volunteer firemen 
seeking donations 



The Virgiiiia Beach Vcdunteer 
Fire and ReKue Squads are 
hmiins to a raise $150,(no in 
ctxnmuniC^ fcontributions during 
a door-to-door fund raising 
campaign in May. 

Some 400 d the city's 546 
vi^nteer fireman will be 
canvassing the city this month 
leaving a request f<»r a 
contribution with a stamped, 
self-addressed envelope and an 
emargoicy telephone sticker at 
each hpme. Mayor Robert 
Cromwell signed a 
proclamation last we^ naming 
May as Volunteer Fire and 
Rescue Fund Raisii^ MonUi. 

The firemen are asking for 
$10 from residents who are 



served by fire and ambulance 
service and $6 from persons 
who receive only fire protection 
service. Each of the 13 fire 
departments has its own 
monetary goal depending on the 
area it serves and the 
equipment it must maintain. 

THE CITY BUDGETS funds 
for maintaining fire hydrants 
and replacement of equipment 
such as fire truck pumpers, but 
it is up to the volunteers to raise 
Ainds for their needed hoses, 
nozzles, breathing equipment 
and turn-out gear (a fireman's 
fire-fighting a[q>arrel). Fire- 
fighting gear for one fireman 
costs about $140. ' 



Radio operators 
to assist rescue 



"The volunteers need the 
supp(H-t of the city," says Red 
Harris of the London Bridge 
Fire Department and 
chairman of the fund raising 
drive. He points out that the 
contributions to the volunteers 
are cheaper than suppwtir^ a 
full-time fire department. 

"To support a full paid flre 
department, Uie city would 
have to raise the tax rate by 52 
"cents on every $1,000 of 
assessed property value," Mr. 
Harris says. "Doesn't sound 
Hke much, but when you have a 
home that costs $40,000 to 
$50,000, it all adds up." 

The volunteer firemen raised 
more than $140,000 last year. 
Mr. Harris says he expects 
about 30 per cent of the 
contributions from $1 to $10 to 
be retivned during May, with 
others coming in through 
November. 



Three citizens band radio 
operators in Virginia Beach 
have formed an organization to 
assist rescue operations and 
other emergency organizations 
in the city. 

Princess Anne County 
Emergency Services (PACES) 
is now trying to recruit 
volunteers who are 
knowledgeable about 
emergency services and would 
like to assisti others in various 
types of emergency situations, 
including automobile accidents, 
heart attafcks and civil 
disasters. 

diUzenB band radio will be the 
priinary fbrm of com- 
munication for members of 
tiie group involved in assisting 
police, fire and rescue 
organizations. Prospective 
volunteers do not have to own 
radios. However, volunteers 
should have an advanced first 
aid card and a certified card in 
cardiopulmonary resuscitation. 

FOUNDERS OF THE group 
are president, Steve Parker; 



operations chief, Manford 
Fields Davis, and captain and 
training officer, Allen W. 
Lawrence Sr. 

Mr. Davis and Mr. Lawrence 
are volunteeer firemen with the 
Thalia Volunteer Fire 
Department Mr. Parker is a 
certified diver. 

Mr. Lawrence said the 
organization has drawn up its 
constitution and by-laws and is 
now trying to recruit members. 
The groups meet every other 
Sunday at 2 pm. in tiie 
Wedgewood Trailer Park 
Recreation Hall. The next 
meeting is Sunday. 

The group's organizers 
emphasized Uiat it intends to 
assist police, fire and rescue 
ooerations and is not in 
competition with those groups. 

Additional inforniaticm on the 
new organization may be 
obtained from Mr, Davis, 24 
Calloway Lane, Virginia Beach, 
Va. 23482, 497-6873, or Mr. 
Lawrence, 245 Calloway Lane, 
490-0602. 



As i^iotggraf^er 

Scout 'tries on' career 



A 




EAGLE SCOUT R<ri>ert Barnes (rf Virgiiiia 
Beach, who wants to became a Marine, diats 
witli his sponsor, Lt Gen. George C. Axtell, 
commander. Fleet Marine Fwce Atlantic, at 
the recent Eagle Scout Recognition Dinner. 
(Sun piioto by Robert Hall) 



Sun photographer Rod Mann 
is sponsoring an Eagle Scout 
from Virginia Beach who Iwpes 
to become a professional 
photojournalist 

Eagle Scout Robert Hall has 
gone on assignment with Mr. 
Mann to get a first-hand view of 
theworking photojournalist. The 
two recenUy attended tiie E^gle 
Scout Recognitimi Dinner at 
Holiday Inn-Scope where Eagle 
Scouts of Uie Tidewater Council 
of Boy Scouts and their sponsora 
were recognized. 

Virginia Squires center Jim 
Eakins was guest speaker at Uw 
dinner. 

Mr. Hall took ovSr Mr. 
Mann's job at the dinner, 
shooting pictures for The Sun. 
Before Uie dinner, the Scout 
visited The Sun offices, where 
Mr. Mann explained Uie 
woricings of the photo lab and 
showed how film is develq)ed 
and prints are made. 

The Eagle Scout project 
allows Scouts to "try on" 
careers ttiey might want to 
pursue in the future while they 
receive expert guidance from 
their sponsors. 




WANTED 

- Houses To SeH 



Anywhere in Va. Beach 

Fof qgick results !|nd more cash in your pocket . . . 
let us sell your property. A competent staff of.Profes- 
slonal experts on duty and always^vailabl^,..- 



CALL 497 4851 

STOHL REALTY 

4920 Virginia Beach Blvd. at Aragona Blvd. 



miraaes 

About two thousand 
years ago, lepers, life- 
time cripples, and the 
insane were healed by 
Christ Jesus and many of 
his followers. 

But somehow their 
accomplishments have 
not become a natural 
way of life for most peo- 
ple, who regard them as 
strictly a phenomena of 
the past. 

The fact is, though, that 
instances of healing and 
regeneration through 
enlightened prayer are 
going on today. Every 
day. 

You can hear some out- 
standing examples— and 
how they were brought 
about — in a talk by 
Catherine H . Anwandter, 
C.S.B.,of 

The Christian Science 
Board of Lectureship: 
This is an hour you may 
never forget. FffiE 
CHRISHANtQBCE LECTURE 
3:00piiiHSiin4iiy,Miy5 
Tin WMli Htran MMri 
1284L«l(lnRNd,Va.teNli 
FniPirklngA 
CMMcanProvldMl 





ONLY 4 MORE DAYS TO SAVE! 

10% OFF ENTIRE STOCK OF 1st 

QUAUn AMERICAN MADE DOUBLE 

KNIT SUITS! 

SIZES 36 to 56 

Sk»t^ it^dn. Loom Extntov, PM«r>. ^«t 

ALL NEW STYLES, COLORS. AND PAT- 
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OppiMiteMaitinrHgliy. 

Open 10 • 9, Mm., "nMi., Itao,, ra., 
10-6W««.,frt. 

S87-060S 




27A is the lever 
to pull at the 
Polls on 
May 7th 




- )Ml 



PAID POLITICAL ADVlRTI^IiENT 

By Authority of B. r. Snatii, Tmsunr 



I would like to thank the 
people of Virginia Beach for 
their encouragement during 
this campaign. I sincerely seek 
your vote - Q^^^^^ ^ _ 




PsM ^eUtkol A^v«rli««nMftt 



Your Man On Tlie City Council 



Incumbent 

Kempsvllle Borough 

Virginia Beach 

Councilman 

Gorland 

ISDELL 




Carland has his roofs with the ptoplt 

• Active In Civic Work, Youth Activities, 

• Elder-PresbyteriarChurch, Member 01 
the Chomber of Commerce 

• Locol 331, Sports Club, Moose Lodge 

• WWllYeteran. 

"In ■ free secitty, yewr vett is ytur iMtt prtcievs riflif. I rtferd 
yMr Import « ■ Mcrt^ tnnt, whicli I dtt^y a^raciota. " 

"H yM cliM$e ta elect me, I will liwier yoMr fruit, I pleilgt to yen 
tt rtsfere Hwiesty wd Inttfrity in govemmtiit. My doer will clwoys bt 
•ptH. I ask fer yo«r btlp wA y»«r mpipert. Tefotlitr wo will work lor tbo 
futwrt of VirfMe leach." 

Thonks 

-^orlond lidvH 

On May 7th— Itom^inb^r 
(kirlmid 

ISDELL 

FOR VIRGINIA BEACH CITY COUNCIL 




eatures 



Pagi A4-The,Sun-W0dn0iday, May 1, 1974 



Women open clinic 



wUh medicaipian 




IIOROSCOPC 



For 
Mayl 

to May? 



.Consumer-controlled medicine is the newest idea 
whose time has come. 

Our medical system today is a dictatorship of, for 
and by doctors. Most healUi care is on a fee-for- 
service basis and it's the doctor who sets the fee. 
Usually, it's what the traffic will bear. 

Furthermore, the doctor-patient relationship is 
<me of God-priest-parent to ignorant child. We 
patients know nothing of our medical histories 
except what our doctors choose to tell us ; ours not to 
question why, ours simply to blindly obey "doctor's 
orders" whether it be for drugs, surgery or simply 
benign neglect. ' 

THIS IS changing, however, and the change has 
been sparked by the Woman's Movement which, as 
women demanded control over their bodies, focused 
attention on medical care. Ultimately, this raised 
consciousness will affect every woman, man and 
child in the country. 

What my very well be a pilot program for future 
health care has been launched by the National 
Women's Health Coalition (a network of women's 
health activist groups). They have just opened a 
women's health center in New York City, where for 
a flat $90 per year, a woman can get unlimited 
ambulatory gynecological care. This fee also 
included laboratwy work, x-rays, minw surgical 
procedures, contraception, pre-and postnatal care, 
and health counseling. Woman are entitled to as 
many visits as they wish even if they are 
asymptomatic. (As a pdnt of reference, the 



minimum fee for a gynecological office visit in New 
York City is $25). 

THE QUESTION women should concern 
themselves with is not how much (rf a savings such a 
plan represents over their present medical bills, but 
how often do they go without gynecological care 
because their symptoms aren't frightening or 
painful enough to warrant parting witii $25. Access 
to health care is important for everyaie but 
particularly so for women who require frequent 
pelvic examinations (often we^ly or monthly) for 
minor but severely discomfiting infections, cancer 
detection, pregnancy tests, venereal disease 
screening, etc. 

According to the coalition's executive director, 
Merle Goldberg, (and this clinic has been her 
dream for six years) the low fees are possible 
because: 

Doctors are (« salary instead of being paid by the 
visit and-or procedure. (The staff also includes 
nurses, nurse-midwives, lab technicians and 
counselors.) 

The clinic is located in a modest-rental area 
iistead of a {x-estigious high-rent address. Under 
this one roof are ultramodern procedure rooms, 
operating rooms, x-ray room and laboratory as well 
as a cheerful waiting lounge. 

THE $90 ANNUAL fee was arrived at by dividing 
the projected budget (staff, equipment, overhead, 
etc.) by the projected patient load ($360,000 by 



4,000). 

In additimi to putting medicine on a nonprofit 
basis the clinic features a patient's bill of rights 
which makes a woman an equal participant with 
medical clinic persimnel in her pers<Hial health 
care. 

Every patient has access to all medical 
information about herself including history, 
diagnosis, x-rays, tot results and drug data. Before 
any drug is administered, she is iitformed <rf all 
contra-iinlications and possible side effects. No 
treatment is undertaken without her informed 
consent, which is defined as complete information 
onanyieavailable options and their cwisequences. 

Ms. Gddberg is now in the process of setting up 
similar clinics in Los Anj^les and in Mississippi. 
She is also helping women throughout the counti^ to 
start their own consumer-controlled medical 
cooperatives. 

Unlike other prepaid medical plans which are 
doctor-controlled, wtwnen who set up their own 
clinics can also set down the conditions. Accenting 
to Ms. Goklberg, as few as 100 women within a town 
or community can start a women's health center; 
all that is really essential is a core of 10 dedicated 
women who are willing to make a commitment to 
the work involved. 

Merle Goldberg can be contacted at the National 
Women's Health Coalition, 999 Third Avenue, 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 11232. Brooklyn was first put on the 
map by a tree; hopefully, it may become known as 
the place where a new health movement grew. 



. ARIES: (March » te h^ 
U— Also Arim Ascendant) — 
Take a backseat now, and re- 
lax. Use your time to clean up 
ideas uid projects from the 
past and make future plau. 
(3ood time to study and reid 
about your career interests — 
adc^t newer ideas and tech- 
niques. 

TAURUS: (April » to May 
20 — Also Taums Ascoidaiit) 
—Open up with mate or part- 
ner. Be willing to conununi- 
cate and listen to other's 
ideas. Cooperation is key now. 
^)proach problems with ttie 
attitude of compromise — re- 
sist stubbornness. Be cheer- 
ful, optimistic. 

GEMINI: (May 21 to June 
20 — Also Gemini Ascendant) 
— Be alert for new labor-sav- 
ing systems. Encourage coop- 
eration so you don't overwork 
and have health problems. 
Friends can be vo-y helpful 
now. Good time to go over in- 
surance papers and legal 
documents. 

CANCER: (June 21 to July 



22 — Also Cancer Ascea^Bt) 

— Be coopwati ve at work so if 
separations occur you know 
you've done your ^«A. Stmie 
cmflict between career and 
personal needs seem evidoit 

— deal with the problems 
openly and realistically. 
Mate decidma. 

LEO: (Joly 23 to Aogust 22 

— Ako Leo Ascndaot) — A 
good time to beautify your 
home — redecorate with cd- 
or. Get out and about to places 
of entertainmoit and cultural 
events, ^gle Leos could 
meet someone now n^te could 
become a long-ttane awiiiiate. 

VIRGO: (Augnst 23 to S«pt 
22 —Also Virgo Ascendaat) - 
Don't get discouraged with fi- 
nandal matters now — better 
times are coming. Get out so- 
cially with friends to lift your 
spirits. You can make a very 
good impression on others — 
espi«:ially highenips. 

UBRA: (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22 

— Also Libra Ascendant) — 
Some duty or re^nsibility 
could come to, you now. Some 
adjustments in relationships 
with mate or partners appear 
necessary. If single, this is not 
the best time to marry. Com- 
plete a project for more in- 
come. 

SCORPIO: (Oct. 23 to Nov. 
21 — Also Scorpio Ascendant) 

— Your charisma is high and 
you have charm to spare. 
Now's the time to contact peo- 



ple in^Mrtant to y<mr career. 
Happiness in romance is indi- 
cated too. Ck>mmunicati(N)s 
invrove; ^m1 trip favwed. 

SAGITTARIUS: (Nov. 22 to 
Dec. 21 - Also Sagittarius As- 
cendant) — Be alert to possi- 
Ue deception throu^ friends. 
Hang on to your money and be 
realistic about your emotional 
life. Resist open-handed 
spending now. Dm't ^ow re- 
sentment toward chilcb^n. 

CAPRICORN: (Dec. 22 to 
Jan. Vi-IHao Qiprlcora As- 
cendsmt) — Tilings seem hap- 
pier at home now. Financial 
prolderos could be the source 
of disagreements with mate 
or partner. Do your part to 
tighten the budget. Unex- 
pected expoise for h(»ne re- 
pairs is possible. 

AQUARIUS: (Jan. 20 to 
Ffeb. U - Also Aquarius As- 
cendant) — Tension regard- 
ing parents, bosses or em- 
ployes requires ymi to make a 
dedsion. Be realistic in your 
goals and expectations from 
others. Finances improw, but 
resist impulsive spending. 
Han ahead. 

PISCES: (Feb. U to March 
20 — Also Pisces. Ascendant) 
- Possibility of a pleasant lit^ 
tie trip now. Financial obliga- 
tions which must be met could 
cause concern. Something 
disappointing may require a 
new beginning — recognize 
when things are beyond your 
control. 



...1 



VIRGINIA BEACH CIVIC CHORUS 

Walter Noona, Director 

presents 

'TIME CAPSULE, 1974" 

Princess Anne High 
School Auditorium 

SUNDAY, MAY 5th, 3 p.m. 

MONDAY, MAY 6th, 8 p.m. 

TICKETS A T THE DOOR 



Games parallel real life situations 



•vi 



7 DAYS 



ANOTHER 

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ETA WAY 

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....JWAY4orMAYll 

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^: One price only $376.50 all ind. < 

n«Ma atk u* about a«Mk Una and Holland- 
Amarica Uno erutoat from Norfolk. 

^^On WORLD TRAVEL 

..PEMBROKE MALL ^g.i\ nnno 

;: VA. BEACH 499-2333 . 



In Norman Mailer's novel 
"TTie Naked and the Dead" 
Lt. Heam {^ilosophizes, '"Die 
thing about chess that in- 
trigues me. and ended up by 
being just boring, is that there 
is nothing remotely like it in 
life." 

It's easy to see the good 
man knew nothing about the 
game. Anyone who does 
knows there is hardly a facet 
of chess that doesn't have a 
parallel in life. 

Happiness, for instance, 
and despair too. "I pity the 
man who knows nothing about 
chess," Siegbert Tarrasch 
noted a long time ago, "for 
dtess, like love, like music, 
has the power to make men 
happy." 




But not sU men. For H.G. 
Wells there was addiction, but 
no hap(Hness. No ches^yer 
sleeps well, he conplained. 
Especially when, at a crudal 
moment in a game, "you see 
with more than daylight 
deamess that it was the rook 
you should have moved and 
not the knight." 

Ex-world champion Mikhail 
Tal claimed the profession 
dosest to chess is ^t of an 
actof^ who experiences both 
the influence of the immedi- 
ate onlo(*er and the distant 



Fina Fo 



I9th Hole 

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• LUNCHEONS 

• DINNER FOR TWO 

Breakfast Lunch 

7 am to 2 pm 1 1 am to 2 pm 

Dinner 

5 pm to 10 pm - 

ENTERTAINMENT 

Friday, Saturday, and Sunday at 7 pm 
John Scott on the Organ 
(f{«servations Desired: 428-7527) 

GOLF RANCH MOTEL 

1040 Laskin Rd. Virginia Beach, Va. 




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OPEN UOSHDAY - SATURDAY, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. 




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Bike to safety 

Today marks the beginning of Bicycle Safety 
Month in Virginia Beach and the Virginia Beach 
Safety Council's second annual all-out campaign 
to alert the public to frequently violated bike 
laws. 

"lii'l Rick Safety" posters pointing out the 
three most violated bike laws will be distributed 
to local schools and businesses as part of the 
information campaign, said H.Jack Jennings 
Jr., Safety Council president. 

"Li'l Rick Safety," a creation of Virginia 
Beach resident Rick Bowles, tells fellow 
bicyclists, "It's the law . . . for our safety." The 
poster warns bicyclists to <*ey traffic signs and 
signals, ride to the right on streets and display 
reflectors and lights for night riding. 

THE SAFETY campaign is aimed primarily at 
')youngster5, although adults are also in- 
cluded, Mr. Jennings said. 

The mayor has issued a proclamation for the 
month including national statistics on bicycle 
injuries and deaths. The proclamation points out 
that most bicj«:lists killed or injured are between 
the ages of 5 and 14. 

Local radio and TV stations and local billboard 
firms are being asked to help in the information 
campaign by donating public service an- 
nouncements and billboard space. 

The Virginia Beach police will begin issuing 
special warning citations this month to 
bicyclists violating the bUte and traffic laws. 
Next month, police will issue citations which 
may result in fines, Mr. Jennings said. 



w/ith Joseph Brown 



fan. But one cynic conplained 
that chessplayers and actors 
have another characto-istic in 
common: neither are real 
people. 

Does chess resemble his- 
tory? The problem at the 1950 
CAympiad in Dubrovnik, Yu- 
goslavia, was what to do 
about France — which in- 
usted on breaking the unwritr 
ten rules by being the first to 
I^y a woman as a team 
member. Madame Chaude de 
SilaiB. ,<She didn't set any 
worlds on fire, but then no one 
goes to the Folies Be-gere to 
eat the popcorn.) 

Chess is famous for the in- 
genious ways of giving your 
opponent a nervous break- 
down. Before the invention of 
the chess clock, toumameit 
games of 10 or 12 hours dura- 
tion were not uncommon. In 
one famous game Louis Paul- 
sen and his opponoit sat fac- 
ing ead) other for several 
houra without either man 
moving a muscle. Finally his 
oi^nent raised one eyebrow. 

"Oh," said Paulsen sur- 
prisedly, "is it my move?" 

Such fidelity to chess is not 
universal, as the divorce 
courts can testify, but there 
are exceptions. England's 
WiUion Hartstoi; and his 
wife, Jana, are boQi master 
players, devoted to chess and 
to each other. But America's 
international masts', William 
Addison of San Francisco, is 
another story. Foe years he 
was a firee-«4ieeling bMshekr 
who played everywhere at 
any time. Suddenly he nur- 
ried, took a job, and disap- 
peared from the chess scene. 

"Someme called lum at 
home and his wife aitswered 
the phoie," an ex-cdieague 
revealed. "As soon as she 
hevd the word 'chess,' ^e 
slanuned the recdver down. 
My god!" he whispered 
hoarsely. 



Chess strikes no sudi dis- 
cordant notes everyviiiere. 
Several months after giving 
birth to a child, Maria Ivanka, 
of Hungary, was back in ac- 
tion, busily winning the 1974 
Hoogoven tournament, in HoU 
land. And in another divisiwi 
oi the same tournament, a top 
showing was niade by D. M. 
Baretic, of Yugoslavia. His 
wife always sits beside him, 
writing down the score of his 
game — because her husband 
is blind. 

Indeed, if love is the yard- 
stick of man's connection wiOi 
life, chess has to be the divin- 
ing rod which brings it all to- 
gether It was, after all, an 
early 20th Century master, 
file German Ernst Schottlan- 
der, who told his wife in words 
that will live in the history of 
chess and love: "Louise, if 
one of us dies, 1 think I'll move 
to Berlin." 

Hastings, England — 1974 

SICILIAN DEFENSE 

MtthaOTal 
(USSR) 

WiUiamHarUton 
(England) 



*V ' 



1.P-K4 
2.N-KB3 
3.P-(34 
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Resigns 



HE NOTED that bicycle laws are rarely e^ 
forced in the resort city and that violations, 
especially by yotmgsters, are frequent. He said 
that most bicyclists are unaware of the bicycle 
la«». p» 



S^-M 



WHEN PLAIMING A 
COOK-OUT CALL JOE FOR 
THE BEST IN MEATS. ALL 
CUTS NEATLY AND CLOSELY 



^1 S. Lynnhwtn Rd. (In Tl» Minl-MalO 

4M-2t33 Joe SuracI 



FASHION CAREER ^ " 

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All Name Brand Ladies Wear 

FACTORY T R ESH LATEST STY LE 

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OTHER CHOICE AREAS AVAILABLE 
CALL COLLECT MR. TODD 904-396-1707 
Or Write: 
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p. 0. Box 26009 
Jacl^sonville, Florida 32218 



ACIOIS 

I. In Am — , fit 
T. Winter iport 

litM 
IS. FairntH 
U. Louitiana 

eoanty 
IS. Bumpkin 
I& TttI* for a 

taniinal 
li. Cempft* 
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20. Authoi iif 

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2t. Amidtt 
tS. IntoxicatinK 
tt. Dix or Knoi 
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M. Canter. 

tot ont 
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eaf«; "Joint" 
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candy 
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state: abhr. 

10. Locate 
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11. Chapcrone ^ 

12. Lrneneiotet 
item 

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22. Weiirhty 

•a. One of the 
three rirtuca 

a. Bwin«« 



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28. ComplaiMd; 
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diahsnor 

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tt. Altered bay 
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Strictly 
Personal. 



Waking up after 
date on Cloud 9 



By PAT and 
MARILYN DAVIS 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

Color me pink! I got a date with one of the most 
popular boys in our class. I was really floating on 
cloud 9. We went to a party and the host served 
beer. I knew we shouldn't be drinking because we 
are all under 18, but I didn't want to be an oddball. I 
thought a person wouldn't really get drunk on beer 
anyway. Well, I not only got drunk, I got sick. 

I feel like a fool. Mike has ignored me since the 
party. How can I undo what I did? 

Cindy 

Dear Cindy: 

Get off cloud 9 and come on down to earth. No one 
can undo what has been done. You made a mistake; 
but if you have learned from it, you have gained. 
Keep in mind that the person who does not drink 
owes neither an apology nor an explanation. 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

I am 18 and a senior in high school. I am active in 
sports, have good grades, but I have a problem ttiat 
is making my life miserable. My ears stick out. 

I want to have them fixed before I go to college, 
but Mom and Dad say there is no reason to have this 
done. Why can't they understand how I feel about 
this? Mom is always saying, "Clark Gable did all 
ri^t. Stop worrying." 

Fred 

Dear Fred: 

Tell Mom you're not Clark Gable. Then consult 
your family doctor and have him contact your 
parents if he agrees that plastic surgery is in- 
dicated. No one should be forced to endure 
humiliation due to a correctable feature. Good luck. 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

I am 18 and married. I went to our family doctor 
and asked 'Wf birth control pills. He said he 
preferred to recommend a sp^ialist and he gave 
me the nam% of a doctw. Tte iSiew doctor was very 
thorough and I liked him very much. 

The iH-oWem is my mother. The family doctor 
told her I had asked for the pill and now she is 
furious. You see, she doesn't believe in birth con- 
trol. Anyway, she is making my life miserable. My 
husband says to ign(K% her but this is difficult whai 
she calls every o&)j. 

— Mary 

Dear Mary: 

Your family doctor had no right to discuss your 
case with your mother. It's unethical for him to 
betray a confidence. Tell Mom to use whatevw form 
dL birth control she choees and that you intend to do 
the same. 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

I have a friend who takes her needlepoint with her 
everywhere she goes. She is constantly stitchir^ 
and talkii^. She w<h*s wi her needlepoint at every 
gathering. 

I finally su^ested to her that others did tmt enj(^ 
this and that she should leave her work at home. 

Mrs. C.C. 

Dear Mrs. C.C.: 

Dis'aeli said : It is mwh easier to be critical than 
to be correct. ' ^ 

Call your friend ai^ tell her you wv^wry. I am 
»ire slw'I^be hu^^y to accept you apolc^. 

Stiktf fimoml iM be ^i to comi^ yo^ q^fttoHi. 
WiUe: fmrnti UmOyH Dtrtt, WnlMtBrndiSm, 138 Rote- 



The Sim-Wednadiy, Miy 1, 1974-P^ A^ 



SUMMER JOBS 



Aid for young workers 



Whm summer comes to Virgima Beach, 
thousands of tourists do, too. So do honks of 
youi^^ peoide looking for ]dt)s. 

Busin^ses needing hdp for the summer 
and ymmg people needing jdi» will be 
matched in the annual summer employment 
campaign of the Mayor's Youth Council, the 
Chamber of Commerce, the Virginia 
Employment Commission and the 
Southeastern Tidewater Opportunities Project 
(STOP). 

To kick off the campaign, Mayor Robert B. 
Cromwell Jr. will attend ceremonies today 
opmvag the summer employment office at 403 
19th St. in the old City Council chambers. 

THE OFFICE will be staffed by student 
members of the Mayor's Youth Council who 
volunteer their time for two weeks to take 
telephone calls in the annual Dialing for Jobs 
program. Dialing for Jobs is aimed at high 



sdiool stuctente se^ii^ sununer employment. 
Virginia Employment Commission 
wcN-kers also will staff the office throi^bmit 
the summer. , 

The Oiamber (tf C(Hnmarce Is addng local 
biffiiness peofde to fin out fiams containii^ 
informatton on the number of a»p%es in 
various categories those businesses will need 
this summer. Tl^ ihformation is turned over 
to the Virginia Emplo^ent Commisdon. 

LAgT YEAR, the project placed 2,635 
young people in temporary summer jobs, an 
employment c(xnmiission spdcesman said. 
This year, the commission expects a season at 
least as good as last year, the spokeanan said. 

Young people seekihg summer jobs and 
business petite looking for summer employes 
are asked to call the summer employment 
office at 4284271 or 4284272. 



ROLL CALL 



WASHINGTON - Here's how 
area Member of Congress were 
recorded m major roll call 
votes April 22 Uvough April 24, 
the days immediately following 
Congress' return from its 
Easter recess. 

HOUSi 

NUCLEAR RESEARCH: RelKtwl, IIS 
f«r and 213 against, an omendmant to 
autttorizaan «tra «1 million in fiscal 197S 
for nuclaar fuilon reiaarcli. Ttia 
amondmant was offarad to an AEC 
aiithorliatloo bill (H.R. 13»»), wfilch 
f. Uto-aady contalnad »1 nnllllan tor such 
rasaarcti. 

The $91 million Itvel Is » million mora 
itw\ the amount suggested by the Office of 
Management and Budget, but $11 million 
;- tMow the AEC's request for such 
rtsearch. The bill now goes to the Senate. 
Existing nuclear power plants generate 
energy by splitting atoms. Fusion reactors 
would generate energy by combining 
atoms. Soma experts contend that 
mastering the fusion process will give the 
wdrld a virtually unlimited source of 
energy. 

Supporters of the re|ected amandment 
argued that the nation should ghf a the AEC 
all the money It requested for fusion. Rap. 
Howard Roblson (R-N.Y.) cited 
"encouraging progress during the past 
yaar." 

Opponents argued that — while fusion 
tiolds long-term promise — the nation 
ttiould emphasiia more Immediately- 
availabla forms of energy production. 
Rep. Mike McCormack (DWa*.) said, 
"We cannot produce ^slon lutT by 
spending dollars." 

Rape. Thomas Downing (D-1), William 
Whitahurst (R-2), David Satterflekl (D-J), 
Robert Daniel (R-4), WC Daniel (D-5). 
Caldwell Butlar (R-«). Kenneth Robinson 
(R-7), Stanford Parrls IR-i), William 
Wampler (R ») and JOal Broyhlll (R-10) 
voted "nay." 

WEAPONS SYTEM OVBRSIOHT: 
Reiected, 152 tor and 23* against, an 
amendment to make the Arms Control and 
»armament P«taci provMa Congress 
Sith evaluallara of the impact of new 
weapons devalapmant on disarmament 
policy. The amendment was offered to a 
bill (H.R. 127W) to aulhorlia fiscal 1»75 
funds for the agency. 

The agency formerly headed U.S. 
negotiations In the strategic arms 
limitations talks, a role now assumed by 
Aw State Department. The agency now 
larvea a* an advisor on arms control 
policy. 

Siwporters argued that Congress needs 
tg know the Impact of weapons 



development an disarmament policy. Rep, 
Dante Fascell (D-Fla.) asked, "Now, what 
IS wrong with that?" 

OpponenH argued that the agency's 
power* should nM be expanded because 
Congress is considering restructuring tf. 
Rep. Peter Frelinghuysen (R-N.J-) said, 
"We would be flying blind" to grant new 
powers to an agency with an uncertain 
future. 

Downing, Whitehurst, Sattarfleld, 
Robert Daniels, W.C. Daniel, Butler, 
Robinson, Parrls, Wamplar and Broyhlll 
voted "nay." 

SURVIVOR'S BENEFITS: Rejacted, 
)I7 for and 1*1 against, an amendment to 
restrict benefits to survtvlnB dependents of 
police, firemen, prison guards and parole 
officers who die In the Una of duly. The 
overall bill (H.R. 11321) proposea SSO,000- 
par-family federal grants to such 
survivors, ralroaetlva to October 11, W2. 

The reieclad amendment would have 
struck the retroactive provision and made 
the day the bill becomes law the effactlva 
date for benefits. 

The overall bill was later passed and 
sent to conference. Its Intent Is to help 
surviving famllias adjust h> the loss of 
their breadwinner, its estimated yearly 
coal is t17 million. 

Those voting tor the limiting 
amandment were a combination of 
memben totally oppoaed to the concept of 
fedst^al benefits and those who felt the 
October, l«72 date arbitrarily 
discriminates against survNor* who lost 
their breadwinners before that date. 

Rep. Charles Wiggins (R-Calif.) called 
the overall bill "a miserable place of 
legislation ... an illustration of groN over- 
promising" In an election year. 

Thaae voting against any cutback of 
baneflh argued for the reh-oacllve date 
because October, 1*72 was when the House 
approved a similar bill that later died In a 
legislative loglam. 

Rep. Lawrence Hogan (R-Md.) saM the 
overall bill, would "demonstrate that 
Americans are grateful to thaaa who take 
the ultimate risk." 

Dawning, Whitahurst, SatterfleM, 
Robert Daniel, W.C. Oanial, Butler, 
Robinson, Parrls, Wampler and Broyhlll 
voted "yea." 

SENATE 

"THE OREAT CHICKEN 

MASSACRE": Pasaad, 5$ for and W 
against, a bill granting federal money to 
Mississippi poultry producers who were 
forced by federal authorities to desh-oy up 
to eight million chickens that had 
consumed feed contaminated with a 
cancar-causing pastlckJe. 

Estimates of the losses range from U 
million to S10 million. 

The bill (S. 3231) now goes to the House. 
It also requires the Justice Department to 



determine responsibility for the 
contaminated feed. Cutpable parties would 
be llaWe for damages. 

Supporters argued that poultry farmers 
who showed good faith and destroyed their 
birds should be granted relief similar to 
that given hog farmers whoae swine 
contract cholera. . ,^ 

Sen. James Eastland (D-Mlss.) said 
these "small and medlum-slied home 
grown and owned businesses" should be 
compensated by the federal government, 
which ordered the birds destroyed. 

Opponents argued against granting 
relief until goutry farmer's claims are 
scrutinized as closely as omar claims for 
such relief. 

Sen. Dick Clark (D Iowa) saw that "¥> 
per cent of the payments will go to lustflve 
large producers." He also called it 
inconsistent to grant full relief to poultry 
farmers while victims of tornadoes only 
' get loans. 

San. William Scott (R) voted "yea." Sen. 
Harry Byrd (I) voted "nay." 

AIR FORCE PROMOTIONS: Approved, 
SI for and U against, the promotion of 
Allen D. Slay (Randolph, Tex., AFB) to the 
rank of Major General In the Air Force. 

The promotion was controversial 
because Slay served under Gen. John D. 
Lavelle, who was drummed out of the Air 
Force for allegedly directing and 
coverlng-up the Illegal bombing of North 
Vietnam In 1*72. As Lavelle's defJuty for 
operations. Slay was in the direct line of 
command during the bombings. 

After approving Slay's promotion. The 
Senate also approved — by a slightly 
larger margin —the promotion of Charles 
D. Gabriel to the level of AAalor General. 
Gabriel also was a Lavalle subordinate. 

Supporters argued that neither man was* 



responsible for the illegal raids or the 
cover-up, and therefore, should not be 
denied ttialr promotion*. 

Sen. Sh-om Thurmond (R-S.C.) said "the 
sole responsibility" rests with Gan. 
Lavalle. Sen. Howai^tf Cannon (D-Nev.) 
said, "The basic Issue Is whether every 
subordinate commander ... Is to be 
charged with ttia re*pon(lbllity qf aecend- 
guesslng" superiors. 

In oppoaing the promotion. Sen. Harold 
Hughes (D Iowa) said the Senate should 
not sanction a system that makes 
"Obedience within one's service more 
Important thari adherence to the highest 
principles of law and civilian control of the 
military." Hughes also argued for sending 
"a message to the Pentagon mat It cannot 
make John Lavalia a scapegoat." 

Byrd and Scott voted "yea." 



MOTORCYCLE INSURANCE: Pasaed, 
72 for and 11 against, an amendment to 
exempt motorcycles from nationwide no- 
fault Insurance legislation. 

The no-fault measure (S. 3i4) would 
require all states to develop no-fault 
insurance plans that meet certain 
minimum federal standards. 

The amendment to exempt motorcycle* 
limited the federal requirements to 
vehicles with at least four wheels, thus 
changing language mat called for no-fault 
Insurance on all registered vehicle*. 

Supporters argued that no-fault 
insurance rates on motorcycles would be 
prohibitively expensive and make 
motorcyclists a vanishing ipacla*. 

OpponanI* argued that the amendment 
violatas the thrust of the bill : to deveWp a 
uniform code for no-fault Insurance for all 
vehicle*. 

Byrd and Scott voted "vaa." 



BOZO'S BIG 




2:30 PM 




fcss%¥?s5sssgaj^ss^^ 



STR IKL f^ 



f I man 



w 



to SPARE 




•**^ 



.^njjTjl/uTJTXlAJTJ'iru^ ~' ~ r''^^'"^ — .^ ^ .- » ,» » ^„»^tj,_^.^.^„».Afc.....— ^ 



ASK YOURSELF THIS QUESTION? 

BUSINESSMAN, CLERGYMAN. HOMEOWNER 

WoiMd the aty usea your sewerage at 4,1% interest OR 
can you Borrow Money at 4.1% interrat? 

Haynes Furniture WD-CAN YOU??? 

\ - ■•■ ■ ■ ■■" . ■.i ww .. 1.1.1 " 



vote for SflND/ BOLlN as 

Yira/nla Beach COmC\imh\J\\ Lh 
^ MAY "^^ /^'^'^ 



PUBLIC NOTICE 



Notice b hereon given that the aty CouncB of the Qty of >^rginia Beadi, Virginia, meeUng in the aty Council Cham- 
ben, Adminbtratimi ftiilding, Municipal Center, ?rincess Anne Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia, at 2:00 pjn., on Monday, 
May 13. 1974, wiU hdd a PuWic Hearing on the proposed budget for the Qty of Virginia Beach for the Rical Year Begin- 
ning July 1 , 1974, and ending June 30, 1 975. 

>^pended hereto is a condensed summary of the proposed budget: 



j^i 



CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH, VIRGINIA 
SUMMARY OF REVENUE BY SOURCE 

FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30. 1975 



1974-1975 



Source 

Revenue: 
General Property Taxes 
Other Local Taxes 
licenses, Permits and 

Privilege Fees 
Fines and Forfeitures 
From Use of Money and 

Property 
From the Commonwealth • 
From the Federal Govenuneht 
From Other Agencies 
Service Purges for Oirrent 

Services 
Sales of Commodities and 

Properties 
Miscellaneous Revenue 
Non-Revenue Receipts 
Proceeds - Sale of Bonds 

TOTAL REVENUES 

ADD: 

Hnancing from Surpluses 



Actual 
1972-1973 



Eitimated 
1973-1974 



Estimate 



Peroentage 
of Total 



$18,391,310 
10,327.943 


$19,861,967 
10,918,500 


$23,782,656 
12,588,000 


25.49 
13.49 


4,130,796 
457,967 


4,898.255 
455,000 


5.250.900 
455,000 


5.63 
.49 


1,197,802 

25,254,393 

3.041,500 

81.814 


1,093.561 

30,449,653 

2,501,831 

83,575 


2.085,983 

34,358.286 

2.492,348 

72.000 


2.24 

^ 36.82 

2.67 

.08 


923,295 


1,400,307 


2,146,790 


2.30 


725.882 

26.991 

1.865.608 


3,991,195 

27,875 

1,947,745 


4,190,487 

38,700 

3,031,250 


4.49 

.04 

3.25 


2,000,000 


— 


— — 


— "T 


$68,425,301 


$77,629,464 


$90,492,400 


96.99 



$ 23.040 



$ 2,843,868 



$ 2,812,205 



3.01 



TOTAL FINANCING REQUIRED $68,448,341 



$80,473,332 



$93,304,605 



100.00 



Condemed summary of Expenditures by Departments: 

mi OF VIRGINIA BEACH, VIRGINIA 



SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES BY DEPARTMENT 

FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1975 



Department 

Legislative 

Executive 

Law 

Fmance 

IVrsonnel 

Judicial 

Health 

Social Services 

Public Safety 

Community Services 

Recreation 

Education 

Library 

Banning 

Agriculture 

Economic Development 

General Services 

Boards and Commisions 

Debt Service 

Schod 

Water and Sewer 

General 
Non-Departmental 
Reserve for Contingencies 

NET BUDGET 



Expenditures 
1972-1973 

$ 288,797 

218,464 

109,062 

1,871,682 

134,926 

1,108,123 

542.848 

4,136,018 

4,465.748 

8,129.013 

1.102359 

31.179,143 

457.749 

257,591 

76,057 

572,042 

841.409 

153.368 

3.142,282 

3,715,270 

2,052,415 

407.713 



Budget 
1973-1974 



314,328 
- 303,355 - 
147,673 

2,447,186 
128,931 

1,417.299 
877,977 

5,^77,786 

5,807,983 
14,119,953 

1,410,752 
37,781,763 
658,370 
315,533 
103337 
733,903 

1,140,915 



109.165 

3.245,831 

2,056,597 

2,411,786 

485,500 

144371 



Budget 
1974-1975 

$ 278.156 
153,235 

161,697 
3,027,129 

158,166 

1.522,418 

1,020,705 

6.164.663 

6,597390 

15,545.621 

1,716.945 

41.610.015 

666326 

340,264 

131,731 

757333 

1,243,259 

114.819 

3,525359 
2303.127 
3.Q66.747 
499,000 
2.500.000 



PeioentafB 
of Total 

.30 
.39 



$65,062,079 



$81,840,294 



$93304.605 



.17 

3.24 

.17 

1.63 

im 

6.61 

7.07 
16.66 

1.84 
44.60 
.71 
37 
.14 
.81 

133 

.12 

3.78 
2.47 
3.29 
.53 
2.68 

100.00 



Red Estate Tax Rate - 1974 Taxable Yetf : 

CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH, VIRGINIA 
REAL ESTATE TAX RATE - 1974 TAXABLE YEAR * 

TAX RATE APPLIED TO EACH 1100 OF ASSESSED VALUE OF REAL ESTATE " 



Borouf^ 

Bayiide 

Bbckwater 

Kemps^e 

Lyni^^ 

RrinceH^Aniie 

PtiiKeitf^Knne Mosquito 

Pungo 

Pungo Mosquito 

Virginia Beach 



d^ 



GcnenI 
Government 



$1.52 
1.52 
1.52 
1.52 
1.52 
1.52 
1.52 
1.52 
1.52 



SixBwough 
School Debt 

$ .04 
.04 

m 
m 
m 

.04 
.04 
.04 



SpeeM 
Revenue 

$ - 



.14 



Mosquito 
Contiol 

$ .04 

.04 
.04 

e»,04 

.04 



TotdRate 
1973 

$1.60 
1.56 
1.60 
1.60 
U56 
1.60 
1.56 
1.60 
1.70 



Md ^Htkiri M««Mn 



.mM A'AVM i> ^ '' ' * *«*IW*' * *^« it M * V ^ ^»« * 



The asstssmtiit ratio Is 60% of fair market valuo. 



personal Property Tax Rate : 
1974 - $6.00 per $100 of assessed value 
^ Assnsment raUo 35% " 

Machinery and Tools Tax Rate 

1974 - $1.00 per SlOOof assessed Value 

Ass^raient ratio 35% 

The bud«t together with the proposed Revenue Ordinance, will be reviewed by the Oty Council on Monday, May 13, 
1974, at 2:00 p jn.. at wh^ time persons wishing to appear in support of and those opposed to the adoption of the bui^ 

^^ ^^'^^J^Qty Coundl should register with the Qty Oerk. Room 310, Oty Administration Bidding, 
before 5:00 p jn., on Wednesday, May 8, 1974. by letter or telephone (4274304), or they may register at the Oerk s desk 
before the meeting opens. 

Persons re^steiing should buMcate tiie budget matter upon wWch they wah to speak. 

RK»ARDJ.WEBiON 

cmrcLERK 



i I 



horts 



Pags A-6-The Sun-Wednesday, May 1, 1974 



SMLINiS 






* 




Kell^m takes golf 
tourney in upset 



Giving NoHbllc 
the what for 

Vii^inia Beach baskefeall teams may have taken 
it on the chin Uiis past season, but the locals 
are making their Norfolk neighbors pay for the 
indignity this spring. 

With the exception of Maury's perennial perch 
atop the Eastern District tennis standings, the 
spring sports season has been an overwhelming 
success from the Beach point of view. The locals 
control the top spot in all spring sports save tennis. 

This year's golf action shows the condition of 
Norfolk's disarray. In the upcoming Eastern 
District tournament, there is the strong possibility 
that the Beach will sweep the top six places. In any 
event, theiocals are a certain bet to take at least 
five of the six top spots with Lake Taylor being 
Norfolk's lone challenger for a place in the first 
division. 

THE OUTDOOR track season is angtber 
tesUment to the Beach's spring revival. First 
Colonial and Bayside are co-holders of first place in 
the standings with perfect 4-0 dual meet marks. 
Kellam is a step behind in second place with a 5-1 
record. The Eastern District track tournament 
May 10-11 shoidd provide another local team 
champion. Currently the Beach's record in head to 
head confrontations with Norfolk schools is an 
excellent 8-4. 

Baseball adds more foundation to the mounting 
evidence of Beach high schools superiority in 
spring endeavors on the athletic fields. The locals 
have taken Norfolk by storm, posting an impressive 
won4ass record in district play. 

Bayside, which leads Qie district with a perfect 5- 
marie as the season reached the halfway point, has 
been one of the biggest thorns in Norfolk's side. The 
Marlins have run roughshod over the neighboring 
city's offerings witti a 3-0 record. 

DEFENDIiyc STATE champion Kempsville is 
next in the line of Norfolk tormentors, pasting a 2-0 
league mark against Norfolk competiticm. One of 
the two Qiirf wins was a 14-2 rout of Booker T. 
Washington. 

Maury, has been the savior of an otherwise bleak 
spring sports season for Norfolk hi^ schools. The 
Commodores are well on their way to their second 
successive undefeated tennis season. Maury has 
defeated all six Beach squads in action on the tennis 
courts. 

Last week, the Commodores had a big week in 
trying to shore up some of the Norfolk high school's 
dam^^ed stature. On the baseball diamond, ttie 
Commodores managed to do what no Beach team 
had accomplished so far this season. Maury solved 
the puzzle of Kni^t pitcher Joe Kwasny, sending 
the star pitcher to his first defeat of the season. In 
tennis, the Commodores routed a trio of local teams 
by ttie imposing combined score of 26-1 in net acticm 
last week. 

Despite the Commodore heroics, it will not be 
enou^ to stave off an overpowering Beach 
performance. Entering the spring season. Beach 
teams had earned only two league titles with Cox 
successftilly defending their district wrestling title 
while Bayside held the cross-country 
championship. 

The spring season promises to add three crowns 
to the local title haul for this scholastic year with a' 
fmuth still not out of the realm of possibility. 



First Colonial and Kempsville 
had rolled merrily along during 
the regular Eastern District 
season. The two beach golf 
powers finished the regular 
season with only two losses 
between them. 

A funny thing happened to the 
two favorites on their 
respective way to the city gdf 
tournament title — Kellam 
dominated the field to take the 
1974 Virginia Beach golf 

championship, Monday. 

The Knights, fresh from an 
upset of district leader First 
Colonial earlier in the wedt, 
raced away from the. five other 
teams, taking the Red Wing 
course apart in the process. 
Kellam posted the best team 
score of any city team this 
season with a cumulative total 
of 292, just four over par. 

KEMPSVILLE. LED by the 
brilliant Roger Savage, took 
home second place honors wlUi 
a ten over par 298. Savage 
captured the mdividual city title 
with his third straight sub-par 
round at Red Wing. He fired his 
second five-under par 67 to win 
the individual title by the 
imposing margin of three 
strokes. 



Princess Anne, showing 
sipis of raining their ^te 
championship form, Hnidied a 
strong third with a team total d 
12 over par 300. All four 
Cavaliers posted 80>re8 in the 

70'8. 

First Cdonial had troutde 
with the front nine and never 
seriously mounted a Uireat in 
the tournament. The Patriots 
made the turn an astronomical 
20 over par. Despite some fine 
playing on the back nine. First 
Colonial finished 15 strokes off 
the pace with a team total of 
307. 

Bayside and Cox rounded out 
the field fini^ii^ with team 
totals of 324 and 341, 
respectively. The Marlins and 
the Fateons are both going 
through a rebuildii^ process 
and are at least a year away 
from being contenders. 

••YOU'RE SEEING some 
kind of golf out there," claimed 
Bayside Coach Conrad Parker. 
"When I first came here a 324 
would have won the district 
tournament, now it isn't even 
competitive " 

Kellam's city title chase got 
(Ai on the right foot in the person 
of Artie Watkins. Supposedly 




KEMPSVILLE'S ROGER Savage keeps his 
head down on a shot during city tournament 
action Monday at Red Wing. The Chief senior 
carded the tourney's lowest score with a five 
under par 67. (Sun photo by Rod Mann) 



the Knights number four 
idayer, Watkins blistered the 
course in two undo- par 70 
fashion He flred nine straigM 
pars to make the ttrn at 36. 

Watkins b^an his i^sualt an 
par on the t>acli nine with two 
birdies. He birdied the 3e3-yard 
par four 12th hde and fallowed 
it up with another birdie on 
tlwparfour 14th. Watkins closed 
out his sterling round with his 
third birdie in seven holes, 
sinking a medium range putt on 
the final htde. His three birdie- 
one bogey effort earned 
Watkins second place in the 
individual rankings. 

Kellam's number three man 
John Dosier clinched the crown 
for the Knights touring the 
course in even par 72. Dozier 
was the (ucture of consistency 
with even par 36'8 for both 
niMs. DoKier's round included a 
trio of birdies. Hewas especially 
tough on the four par five holes 
with two birdies. 

Kellam teammates Tommy 
Hardy and Billy Woolard fired 
identical 37-38-75s to complete 
the runaway. 

SAVAGE WAS brilliant in his 
tourney winning round of 67. He 
missed a chance at a seasonal 
best of 66 when an eagle putt on 
18 curled wide to the right. 
Savage made the turn at two- 
umier par 34 and blistered the 
back nine in three under par 
fashion. 

Savage posted a total of six 
birdies on his tour around the 
course. He had only one bogie 
that coming of the third hole. 
Savage is 14 under par <»i three 
trips around Red Wing's 
friendly surroundings and must 
rate as a serious contender to 
dislodge Princess Anne's 
Richard Tucker from the 
individual state crown. 

State champion Tucker had 
an excellent round of his owii 
Monday. Playing in the same 
threesome with Savage, Tucker 
hit every green in regulation on 
■ his way to an even par round of 
72. Tucker made the turn one 
under par, but bogies on the 10th 
and 13th holes ended his bid to 
catch Savage. 

Bayside's Pete Keeling was 
the other golfer in the field to 
match par .wi the afternoon. 
Firing his best round this 
season, Keeling birdied the 463- 
yard par five 11th hole then 
' dosed out his round with seven 
straight pars. 

Pre-tourney favorilp First 
Colonial suffered from a 
disasterous periormance on the 
front nine. Number «Je player 
Reynolds Dawson, playing with 
' Savage and Tucker, skied to a 
ten over par 46 on the front half. 
Dawson's round was ruined by a 
b(^e six on the fifth hcde 
followed by a triple bogey seven 
at the sixth hole. 

Dawson did recover on the 
final rone holes to post a 
respectable 79 with birdies on 
the nth, 14th and 18th. 
Kellam's new found muscle 
will be ^ven a further test at 
the district tournament 
Thursday at Eagle Havea 



-[ 



PREVIEW 



City tnudc meet set for Friday 



Tracic 

The Eastern District will close out their 
dual meet season this afternooa The 
schedule finds First Colonial travelling to 
Booko- T. Washington; Bayside visiting 
Granby; Princess Anne hosting Kellam 
and Kempsville at home against Ncrview. 

First Colonial, led by the brilliant Bert 
Lewis, is currently tied with Bayside for 
the (fistrict l«id with klentical 4-0 records. 
Bockn- T. Washington shouki not cause 
much trouble. The Bookers have 
already lat big to KempvUle and 
Princess Anne, two teems the Patriots 
t(^>ed dhiring the campaign 

Bayade should follow First Colonial'f 
lead and fu^h undefeated on the outdoor 
circuit The Marlins have been impressive 
in all four wUngs, while Granby has 
sitffered b^^Wadcs to First Cdonial and 
Kdlam. The Marlins have a win over 
Kellam to their credit 

Kdlam will carry a four-roe^ winning 
streak into their confrontation apinst 
Prince Anne. The oidy blemish on the 
Kni^ts' record was the season-c^oiing 
km to Bayidde. 

Prlnoera Arnie has been competitive on 
die outdoor circuit, Init Have only «ie dual 
meet win to show for tt^r ^ort This 
week should run about true to form wiUi 
the GavaUers staying close but not dose 
eacMi^ 

Kempsvilk has been even closer than 
Prim»H Anie, 'losing two dual meets by 
the corobiaed tiMl cf stac poinU. The 
(Meb MPS collared witti a me<ttocre 1-3 
dual meet mark, despite tte fine 
perfornances cf long distance runners 
Steve Sawyer and Matt Stavsh. TIm pair 
have swefA die no, mile and Mromite in 

aU Cots' BMKti. 

the b^ attractiaa of Qito weds's timdk 
•ehadriewfflbe te dl^ me^ Friday trif^t 
atBa^Ue from six to nine. Bayside must 
rate Hh favwrite ride with Kellam and 
FtatCtiimlaUlBi^flga doM second and 
MM to Aa liMB MOipetitifla. Kempsvilk, 



Princess Araie and Cox should finish in 
diat order to round out the fieki. 

Individually the 100-yard dash could be 
the showcase event of the competitiwi. 
Roscoe Coles, Jerry Mosely, Leroy 
Baxter, Lewis and Lindsey Campbell tq? 
ttie fidd. AU have the capability of 
breakii^ the ten second barrier. Bayside's 
Coles and Moeely along with First 
Colonial's Lewis have already bettered the 
mark this season. Baxter's and 
Campbell's best times have been ten flat 
Cdes has posted the best time of any dty 
farrier with a 9.8 clocking an^n^st rate 
as the favorite. 



'^^^^ 



Teammate Mosely tops the 2» field, but 
he should be severdy tested by Lewis and 
CampbeU. Cox's Derek Canaan is a 
darkbfxw in Qm fiekL 

In the 440, Cotes must again be given die 
nod. The Marlin senifNr is undefeated in die 
event Oiis seasoa Shouki l» falter, 
Kdlam's Margo White or Princess Amw's 
Robbie Edwards couU take die event. 

■rae hurdte evaits dkwki be dominated 
by PrinceM Anne's Carl Fr«id and 
Kdlam's Jff Henry. Frend is uncreated in 
the tdgh hurdtes. 

The 880 and the mile sbouU be the otho* 
showcaie events of the city meet 
Bayskk's Eric Cba|«ian, Cok's Brian 
RMn^iart and ttie Kempsville Aio <rf 
SaW^erw^StavahshauM be involvwl in a 
hectic f iiish. 

In the two-mile, Stavish nast rate as die 
prdBbitive favoite. He to the <mly runi^' 
to finish under 10 minutes this season and 
has dom it die last two weeks in a rcw. 

The discus and dw sh(A put omipetitioo 
wUI be cbminated by Kellam's Ken 
totle^ and the First Cdoaial duo of 
J^y <My«ai»*w ami EmM Davis, Rutkdge 
is nndafeated thil seasm in both events. 

ta tte U^ jump, Kemfsville's Mike 
(^•Mree will bring an umkf^ted record 
tsto die eoo^etltian. 



Tennis 



Beach tennis teams are sin^ng that 
same old sad song. Who is gdng to be^t 
Maury? The Commodores are one match 
away from completing their second 
successive undefeated season. The 
defending district champion routed three 
Beach challengers last week by the 
combined score of 26-1. Maury's 
rou^housing of Beach netmen rendered 
die locals also rans ia die district First 
Cdwnal shouki take home the \vs& share 
of local honors witti a ruimer-up finish. The 
Patriots only loss of tttt seasm came 
agaimt league-leading Maury. Kempsvilte 
should fitusb a dose third with two district 
losses, marring Uieir record. The Chiefs 
have kist to Mfury and Ftavt Cdonial. 

The final regular season tennis dates 
fiiKl Princqis Anne travelling to Bodcer T. 
Washington; . Kempsville visiting 
Nwriew; First Cdonial hosting Cok; and 
Kdlam at hon% apinst Bayside on 
Friday. 

Princess Ai^ rebounded strong last 
week, breaking a two-matdi lea streak 
widi two easy triumphs. Bodcer T. 
Washii^tfflishauk! become vktim nundi«- 
ttiree as dieCa^lterscloBe out die regular 
season in stroi^ fashion. 

Kempsville's trip to Norview should be 
equalfy {HWhicdve. The Chiefs were 
manbanded 94 fay Maury last week, 
losii« for die first time in Uie moadi of 
April Norview shouki lawe to be an 
easi^ tadc. 

First Cdotdal hu not kst since Afril 2. 
Cog^ aldMugh isvroring of kite, is not hi a 
position to chaltalge dw strong Patriots. 
First Cdrndal routed diree oppoooils in 
action Itft wedi. 

Kdlam 1^ a migh tin^ kst wedc 
\asa% trig to both First Cdonial and 
Mittuy. Baysi^ has lost to everybody so 
br tkki season. Tlw Martia taststot at a 
^trkA win shnM pus timn I9. 



Agameih^e 
face of a coach 






One can get the feel at a ^me Just 
from the expressions on a coach's 
face. At top. First Colonial Coach Ted 
Phelps is in a reflective mood as the 
game begins. Phelps asserts his 
authority (above middle) by 
signalling his players. The First 
Cotonial leader is in a smiling mood 



(above) as tilings start to go the 
Patrkits way. First Colonial held a 2-1 
lead thanks to a first binlng home run 
by Chris Swecker. Ilie smile turned to 
a frown < bottom) when Kempsville 
rallied for five runs in the final inning 
to send Phelps and Fh-st Colonial to 
their frnvth consecutive defeat. 



Ife 




Bun photos by Noal Shns 



■■■ 



■■■ 



"▼y- 



J 

1 1 



il 



i 



PREVIEW 



The SiUi-WNlneMUy, May 1, 1974-Pifo A-7 



Baysidein driver seat at ha/fway mark 



With j^ two vefks to go in the hi^ school 
baseball 8eas<m, the penoant picture is beginniiig to 
clear tip. The focal point (d the title chaw is 
Bayside, who reached, the halfway point <d the 
Eastern CMstrict season with an umblonished 
mark. 

Kellam must also rate as a definite title 
possibility with a second place recw^ of 4-1. The 
iU)i^ts must rebound from last week's cosUy l(»s 
to Maury. 

Kempsville and Maury lurk in tfie bac^ound as 
ouUide threats. Both teams curre^y hold 3-2 
district records and could be there to take the pr\xe 
should the frontrunhos falter. 

BAYSIDE 

Bayside is in the driver's seat as the pennant race 
heads down the stretch. Itie Marlins have ridden 
the crest of a six-game winning streak to Uie top 
spot of the league staikUngs. Baysitte currently 
holds a one-game lead over second place Kellam. 

This week's schedule has Bayside hosting Lake 
Taylor Friday before a privotal contest at Kellam 
on Tuesday. 

The Marlins have been propelled to the top by 
their two-man pitching rotation of Marty Moore and 
Craig Wiesner. Both pitchers own perscmal ttiree- 
game win streaks. Moore is slated to go against 
Lake Taylor, While southpaw ace Wiesner will face 
Kellam and sprii^ sensation Joe Kwasny. 

The Marlins had not hit a home run all season 
entering last week. In two games, Bayside hit ttie 
long ball five tiines. 

Moore should handle Lake Taylor regardless of 
the Marlins new found power. He already has one 
victory over the Titans to his credit. Wiesner on the 
other hand could use all the off^isive help he can 
get against the hard hitting Knights. 



COX 

Cox's ragn as the seasMi's CimteeUa team came 
to an Old last week witti the loss to Lake taylw. 
The defeat dropped the Falcons out d tUQe 
cmtentiai. Cox now resides in the middle id ttie 
pack with a 3-3 record. 

a>x could flourish hi th^ role as a spod&r. Tbe 
Falcons have already hurt Kem[aviUe's chanras 
with a 2-1 iq>set win. lliis v/etk Cox travds to 
Mmiry on Friday aiKl hosts Princess Aiuie m 
Tuesday. 

The Falcm charge from tiie bott<«i <rf ttie 
standings has beoi led by hard-hitting outMdo' 
John Zimmerlv. T*e senior boasts one <rf the 
district's highest batting averages at .500. 

Coach Tom Fiidier has been gettii^ |p«at 
mileage out of a trio of pitchers. Jack Farell, BUI 
Hoped and Barry Noe i^tch in nearly every Falcm 
contest with opposing hitters rarely se^ng the 
same pitcher twice in one afternoon. 

Although, it would rank in the upset cat^tny if 
Cox knocked off Maury. It w«Mild not come as a 
suriHise. Tliree teams have already found the 
Falcons better Uian thehr reputation. 

In any event, the Falcons should come away witii 
a split with Princess Anne being a decided 
underdog in the Tuesday confrontation. 

FIRST COLONIAL 

First Col(Hiial has gone into a mid-season swooi 
after a {nvmising start. The Patriots have droiq>ed 
four straight games due in part to some faulty 
fielding. 

First Colonial now finds themselves looking up 
from the bottom with a 2-4 district record. The 
Patriots have developed the disturbmg habit of 



Mowing leads in tiie late innings. Itie malady 
struck twice la^ w«dc as L^e Taylor w<ni with two 
runs in the sixth inning, wMle Kempsville scored 
five in the seventh to d^eat the Patriots. 

First Oolniiid's oofy actira ctf the week fii^ 
th«n travelling to Booker T. Waahin^n on 
Tuesday. 

Chris Sweckor hatf been the oftoisive leader, 
'Uting two home runs last week. Sweclw t^ the 
Patri(A hitting cburts with a .367 average. 

With a week off, the weU-rested Patriots should 
handle ttie faltering BocAmrs. 

KELLAM 

Kdlam's tiUe chances suif»«d a sevore blQw 

with the loss to Maury. It was not all bad, 
howevor; pitcher Rich Bloxom hurled his first 
oimidete game of ttie seas<m, a three^iit diutoirt of 
Granl^. 

Kellam faces a bmy week ahead with ttiree 
games M ttie schedule. Iliis afternoon Kellam 
hosts Princess Anne; Friday the Knights travel to 
Book&c T. Washington before ttie crucial Tuesday 
showdown with Bayside. 

KeUam omtinues to hit the ball with authority, 
scoring at a rapid clip. Outfielder Mike Redus 
continued his heavy hitting as the Beach's leading 
hitter addted his first home run of ttie campaign last 
week. 

Still, ttie Knigbts fortunes can be summed up in 
ttie simple piilrase — the way Kwasny goes so goes 
Kellam. The ace righttiandter suffered his first 
defeat of the season last week, droi^ing his record 
to 4-1. When he is at his best, Kwasny is hard to hit. 
Tuesday will provide the answer to Kellam's 
challenge of Bayside. 



KEMPSVILLE 

The ^strict lOBsea have relegated Kempsville to 
wait and aee dfuatton. Even if the Chiefs finish Uie 
ranalnd^ctf the seastNi undefeated, they must sttU 
depend oa help from ottier teams to knock off Uie 
front-rumiers. 

The job at hand finds ttie Chiefs hosttng Norview 
Friday and Lake Taylra- mi Tuesday. Bobby 
Harriwm \^11 (ritch Friday witti Jimmy Moore 
sli'ted to go in the encwe against Lake Taylor. Botti 
pitch«^ have idonttcal 4-1 records with nine 
conj^ete games between them. 

The Oiiefs diould have littte jH'oblem in handling 
ttie two challengers from Norfdk. Unfwtunately 
fjnan Konpsville's point of view, ttiey no longer 
control their own fate. 

PRINCESS ANNE 

Coach Don Van Benschoten enteral ttiis season 
wttti the claim of never having a losing season. 
Good Uiings cannot last forev«r as ttie Cavaliers 
awarded ttieir coach witti his first sub par season as 
ttieir record dtopf^ to 0-7 last week. 

Ilie Cavaliers finally found ttieir stride at Uie 
plate, scoring a season high of seven runs against 
Bayside and adding five more against Booker T. 
Washington. 

The search fcH* the initial win continura ttiis week 
wiUi a game ttiis afternoon at Kellam, a Friday trip 
|o (kanby and a TuMday cmfrontattm against 
Cox. 

The Cavaliers are not nearly as bad as their 
record Indicates. This could be ttie week ttiey 
finally make ttie breakttirough. 



Bayside routs Falcons; 
First Colonial stays even 



Track action ran about true to 
fm-m last wedc. Bayside and 
First Colonial continued their 
unbeaten ways, while Kellani 
remained within striking 
distance with their fourth 
straight victory. 

Bayside 98 
Cox 33 

Cox had not won a duel match 
during the outdoor season. 
Bayside had yet to lose one. By 
the time the afternoon closed, 
nothing had changed. The 
league-leading Marlins had 
blasted their oppflnmnt with an 
overpowerir* perf ornnance. 

Roscoe' Cdes was perhaps 
the biggest thorn in the Falcims 
side. The Swtft Marlin senior 
won three events and ran the 
first leg (Ml Bayside's winning 
mile relay team. Coles edged 
teammates Jeny Mosely and 
Lo-oy Baxter in the 100-yard 
dash with a time of 10.1 seconds. 
Running effortlessly, Coles put 



the 440 in the Marlin win 
column with a time of 53.2 
seconds. He rounded out his 
afternoon with a win in the high 
jump on a leap of 5'8". 

The expected duel l)etween 
Cox's Brian Rhinehart and 
Bayside's Erie Chapman never 
materialized. Chapman 
dominated Rhinehart in both 
the 880 and (he mile. Chapman 
pulled away from his opponent 
in the last quarter of both races. 
His winning time in the mile 
was an excellent 4:24.8. 

First Colodal 73 
Princess AweM 

First Colonial sw^t the field 
events in route to their win over 
Princess Anne. The triumph 
enabled the Patriots to keep 
pace with Bayside, both teams 
hold uid)eaten 4-0 dual marics 
fw the outdoor seasoa 

Bert Lewis continued to lead 
the Patriots. The senior had his 
third triple win meet of the 






I 



Lombard! weekend 
has added diversity 



Golfing witti the Redskins will again be the 
highlight of the third annual "Redskins Remember 
Lombardi" weekraid May 10-12 at Virginia Beach. 
Howeyer, ttie weekei^ will also offer an extensive 
progqiun of social and recreational events designed 
for nkm-golfers. 

Al Abiouness, co-chairman of ttie event, 
announced the 10-member Norfolk Sports Qub 
committee has develcqied a weekend which is 
designed to appeal to a much greater segment of 
"hd^water social groups than only the golfer and his 
fan&ily. A wine and cheese party at the Cavalier 
Ocfeanfront from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. May 10 will kick 
off tfie weekend's festivities. May 11 will feature the 
golf tournament at Red Wing, a fashion show and 
tennis tournaments. A cocktail party, spcmsored by 
ttie NtHfolk Sports Club, and ttie third annual 
Redskins dance will close out ttie day's activities. 
Tentattvely scheduled fcr May 12 will be fisMng 
trips vnth private pleasure boat owners. 

Proceeds from the entire affair are donated to the 
Lombardi Cancer Research Center at Geoi|;etown 
University and to ttie sports clubs scholarship fund. 

This year'^cket prices have beoi restructured 
to reflect ttie empha»s on a lUverslty ^weekend 
evta^^/^iAal package, includii^ ttie wine and 
chdm^M^dance, tennis toumamoits, fasten 
show ami cocktail party, are priced at $40.00 per 
couple. A golf and »)cial package is i»iced at $75.00 
per c(W|Ae. No eiBdurive goU twiraameait^^tete 
will be sold. Golf ttck^ are tM&ei (»ily as pnfW 
ttie weekraid package. 

Infmrmatton and ticketo are available throi^ 
men^ie^ ci tiie Norf dk Sports Club «- the Cavalier 
Ocean frait. 



spring seasoa Lewis won the 
100, the 220 and the long jump. 
His 10.0 time in the 100 was his 
second best of the season and 
one-tenth of a second off his own 
school record. 

So[rfiomore Jerry Ohnaizer 
won his second straight shot put 
test for the Patriots witt a 
heave of 52'1". Ernie Davis 
combined with Lewis and 
Ohnaizer to give the Patriots 
their strong f idd showing with a 
win in the discus. 

Carl Frend wasihe CavaUers 
only double winner. Frend 
placed first in both the high 
hurdles and intermedia t& 
hurdles. He has vioa five of his 
first six ^races this season. 
Princess Anne's record is now 1- 



KellamSl 
Maury 40 

Kellam won their fourth 
consecutive dual meet to 
improve their second [riace 
district record to 4-1. For 
Maury, it was tlieir second 
strai^t loss to a Beach squad. 

Lii^ey Campbell turned in 
one of the day's most 
impressive performances witti 
a brilliant 220 time. Campbell 
covered the distance in 22.9 
seconds. It w^s Campbell's best 
220 time of tlie season and the 
best 220 time of any district 
harrier last week. 

K«i RuUedge cmtinued to be 
a mainstay in the Kellam trade 
effort. Rutledge kept his 
personal unbeaten mark intact 
by winning the shot put and the 
discus for the fifth successive 
meet. Rutledge took sh(A {mt 
honors with a throw of 50'3" 
while placing first in the discus 
competition on a throw of 
138'10". 

Lake Taylors? 
Kempsville M 

Kem[»ville remained the 
hard luck team of the outdoor 
seasoa. The \obs to Lake Taylor 
was the Chids third strai^t as 
their record dropped to 1-3. It 
was the ttiird week ina row that 
the Chiefs tad been on the 
wrong side of the scweboard in 
a squeaker. 

Ma^t^ Stavish scored the 
Uggeerupset of the day besting 
teammate Steve Sawyo- in ttie 
mUewittia time of 4:27.2. It was 
StavWs best ihile time of the 
season as he avenged Uiree 
earlier defeats to Sawyer. 
Stavish doulded witti a win in 
the two-mUe, br«iking the to»- 
minute barrier for the second 
strait wedi witti a wiimiiut 

timeaf9:S7.8. 

■■■■■illMMMMilMIMNMMMr 



I 



Athlete of the Week 

Craig Winner 

Bayside 

Baydde's Craig Winner lus been selected 
Vii^mia Bach's h^ sclMxd athtete of Ow 

Wte^o* ramed the distinction witti h» 
I»tc&|E« last vraek. Ibe southpaw won (»» ball 
game aiKi saved anotter for ti^ league- 
leaAi^ Marlins. In his route going 
perftxtnance apinst Booker T. Wa^iington, 
Wieraier ^rw^kout 14, i^nle wuming h^ tUrd 
wi^Mit a k^. 

An ouMan^ng Mgh school athlete wiU be 
named t^ The &m ttetNi^ioiA the firing 
gporla season. 




*P 



■I 





_ „-^_-, a loon is as easy as most 

bSiks s^kis^hoivaimepemle 

sM feeliiiieasy about addng ftw It: 

No on^e erqbys borrowing 
money Its as simple as that. 

Even though all of us do it 
at one time or another. 

Even though, many times, 

it maks sense to bor rcfw 

Even tiiou^, sometimes it 

can xtually save yDU money 

-sSSSSS'5^^ Still no one enjoys it 
So^^ilenyoucometoUnite(iVlrginiaforaloan, 

we try to mak the \\iiole process as quick and as 

painless as possible. 

WSl explain our different kinds of loans and 
help you decide which one is the best one for you. 

v^ll tell you exactly how your loan works. 

If you need a special repayment pbn, well try 
to work that out, too. ^ 

So when you need mone)^ for a new car, home 
improvement, hill consolidation or aiw; good 
reasai, ronember you dont have to to it alone. 

TMking about iroiey may still be dilticult 

for most people to dQ,but atUnitedVirginia 

its vdiat we do best 

Utill]ed\^rgii]la<0[ 




^ 



ft^ A-«-The Sun -Wednesday, May 1, 1974 



•,v 



aiLIGAN'S 
ISLAND 



.t 



4:30 PM WEEKDAYS 





\ 



DICK VAN 
. DVKE 



r ■' 



r:. 



KT 



6 PM WEEKDAYS 



f 



THE 700 
CLJB : 



^. 



WEEKDAYS 



MAURY ROADBLOCK 

Beach hopes dead end 



THE 



BOLD ONES 



^-^1 



Beach Eastern niRtrict. timnifi tiOe h(^)e8 
met a familiar roadblock Friday at 
KempsviUe. Maury handed the Chiefii 
Uiier second lou of the season with a 9-0 
wMtewash. First Cdooial is still in title 
contention with only one district less. The 
defending champidn Commodores seem 
destined to complete their second 
consecutive undefeated season with only 
one match remaining. For the Patriots to 
grab a share of Oie title, Maury must lose 
this week. 

KempsviUe bad entered the Maury 
match with a en match winning streak 
and an 7-1 disti^t record. The Chiefs had 
not lost since tHeir league opener against 
First Cdonial. 

Maury put on an awe|ome display of 
strength in their win over KempsviUe. In 
sweeping both the singles and the doubles, 
the Commodores won aU Init two of the 
matches in straight sets. 

KEMPSVILLE'S NICK O'Hara had a 
string of his own snapped by the 
Commodores. O'Hara entered the match 
with a stri^ of 16 consecutive winning 
sets. The streak ended with a 5-7, 7-5 , 6-3 
loss. 

David Brandt and BiUy MiUer both 
suffered their first defeats at tne season. 
Miller was the other Chief not ta faU in 
straight sets, losing ft-1, 6-7, 6-l/ 

In other action Friday, "Km Cdonial 
continued to roll along wiUi a 9-0 win over 

Lake Taylor; Cox blasted Booker T. 
Washington 6-1; Princess Anne rebounded 
with a 7-2 win over Grahby; and Norview 
edged Bayside 5-4. 

The Patriots remained on league leader 
Maury's heels with their easy win over 
Lake Taylor. First Colcmial's only loss of 
the season was to Maury. 

THE PATRIOTS were impressive in 
their big win sweeping both the singles and 
doubles tests. All but one cf the victories 
came in straight sets. 




Princess Anne continued their 
comebadc from two losses two wedcs ago 
with an easy triumph over Norfdk's 
Granby. The Cavaliers took five of the six 
singles tests. 

Bayside came as close as Uiey have aU 
seascm to notching that first district win, 
but close was not quite good enough. The 
Marlins feU when they lost two of the 
three doubles matches. Bayside had 
managed a split of the sue singles tests. 

In action AprU 24, KempsviUe and First 
Colonial wo-e big winners while Cox and 
Kellam found themselves on the wrong 
side of lopsid^ scores. 

KEMPSVILLE BLASTED Co^ 8-1. The 
Chiefs swept all six singles tests in straight 
sets. The Falcmis avoided a shutout with a 
doubles win. O'Hara was the Chiefs most 
impressive performer winning 6-0, 6-0 over 
Steve Barry. 

First Colonial recorded their second 
shutout of the week with a crushing 9-0 win 
over Granby. The Patriots won aU their 
matches in straight sets for the second 
time in the v/e«k. 

Kellam found the going difTicult against 
perennial power Maury, losing 9-0. It was 
the third time this season a Beach squad 
had been shutout by the defending district 
champions. 

In actim April 23, First Colonial downed 
Kellam 6-1 : KempsviUe dropped Granby 8- 



1; Booker T. Washington defeated 
Bayside 5-4 and Maury flattened Cox 8-1. 

First Colonial continued their 
domination of Beach temis teams with 
thdr easy triumph over KeUam. Hie' 
Patriots have now defeated every Beach 
squad without a loss. It was thdr second 
victory of the season ova- KeUam. 

The Patriots took five of the six singles 
matches with all the wins ctmiii^ in 
straight sets. Jeff Danforth was First 
Colonial's most impressive netman with a 
6-1, 6-1 win over Mike Richardsoa 

Neil Jdmson was KeUam's lone victor 
with a 6-3, 6-1 win over Howard Jones. Tf» 
Patriots swept aU three doubles matches. 

KempsviUe registered their ninth 
straight win with the trium|ki over 
Granby. The Chiefs were victors in five of 
the six singles matches, Nick O'Hara 
continued Ms fine play with a 6-1, M 
straight set wia KempsviUe swept aU 
three doubles matches in route to the easy 
wia 

Bayside continued ttieir improved play, 
but once again it was not enough as the 
MarUns were edged by Booker T. 
Washington. 

Tim Knerr, the most experienced 
member at an inexperienced team, won 
fw the Marlins with a 6-1, 6-1 singles 
triumph. The Marlins went on trora 
Knerr's vict(H7 to split the six singles 
matches with the Bookers. 

Bayside lost a shot at their first district 
victory when they dropped two of three 
doubles matches. The effort did mark an 
im{H-ovement tar the Marlins, who had 
been shutout in their three previous 
matches. 

Cox did not score a victory over Maury, 
but the Falcons were the only Beach team 
to score a point off the league leading 
Commodores this wedc. The Falcons 
registered a doubles win as George Sun 
and Mike WadeU combined for a 6-4, 6-1 
trium{^. 




BAYSIDE'S HARRY HaU chases after a ihot 
in a doubles match Friday against Booker T. 
Washington at Bayside. Teammate Dave 
Randall and HaU drt^ped the doubles matdi 
6-4. 6-1. (Sun photo by Rod Mann) 




PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT 





weekdays 11 PM 



k 




EXPERIENCE ABILITY 

INTEGRITY 



These ''men of experience" have proven their 
concern for the overall well-being of our City 
and it's residents. Their records show the great 
effort and dedication they have already put forth. 
These men are concerned - about quality ed- 
ucation, balanced growth throughout the com- 
munity, the transportation system problems, & 
they advocate the extension of water and sewage 
lines, particularly in older development areas. 
They want to continue working towards feasible 
solutions., Re-elect the "men of experienced- 
Bob Cromwell and Murray Malbon. 



Re*elecf 
CromwelMdalbon 



**Men of Experience" 



Va.Beach 
City Council 



^ ayttiorHy of MMlar J. tanUawlci. TraMMir 



■*fl«Ma«MnaMaaHaaHM 



■Mi 



PATRIOTS FALL 6-2 



Ike tai-WMtandsy. 1% 1, IflA-hm A^ 



^e-mn seventh keeps Chiefs alive 



ByJOHNBANNON 



Tte ffick^i^ flame of KonpevUle's biyM for a 
(hifd g^seniave state t»»^«n champiomdiip v^e 
idMMte be wisMw^ out by Firrt Colo^d. Tlie 
Pirfriots and Scott Lowwy iwre Uffee outs away 
fros hand^ ttie Chiefs ttfdr third Eastern IMstriot 
lonttd a eert^ death to aay titte dreams. 

The Kempevflle (rffenae aw^ frras a gune- 
k»g dinnber to provide the saving impetus as the 
Chief's wavered on the brisk of extinctiai^. Sending 
U mm to flie iriate in the final ho^, Kempsvilte 
ovorcame the First Colonial lead fir a $-2 lead. 

Chris SweeiGH- had given Ae PaQMi an early 

advantage in the bottom ol the first bniag. Demy 
Ogle started the inning off by working KempsviUe 

starter Bob Harrison for a base on baUs. Two outs 
lata*, SwedEHT gave the I^iMots a two-run cmhim 
witti a to^ home nm to ri^t c«iter. It was 
Sweck«*'s second round tripper of flie season. 

THE PATmOTS would threaten often against 
HarriscHi avm the ranainJng six innings, but 
Harrison was eatal to the ta;^ »udi time. 
Swecker's bla^t was all the offense Fir^ Colonial 
could manage <m ttie aftarnooi. ttoriaon's route 
going performance improved his rec^d to 4-1. 

Lov^tlu«Wwdlinthe(H)eniniliiiidn0.fM>ing 
ori^ 10 m«i in ttie first three inninp. ^mipsville's 
onl^ basorunno- over tiie irtretch relied safeiy 
wboi Patriot shortstq) Sfike Bowman booted a 
routine ffvmda in the second. Lowery esciqied 
miscattied f<nxdng Jerry Crain «nd Kevin Smith to 
beat the ball into the ground. 

Kempsville started to reach the Patriot 
rigMhaado* in the fourili inning. SlMnistop Alan 
Priee lined a lead-off sin^e. Teammate Steve 
Hanson foxed Prtee at seobiMl. but atoned for his 
failure i^ stealing second base. 

One out later Harrison helped Us own cause with 
a Une drive single to right, counting Hansm. Crahi 
continued the onslaught on Lowery with 
Kempsvflle's third solid hit of the inning. The rally 
ended, however; as Harrison was cutdown trying to 
go from first to third on Crain's hit on a strong 
Arow firom Patriot leftfielder Carl McDonald. 

With the Patr&>t8 dinghig to their slim 2-1 lead, 
KempsvQle threatened again in the fifth innmg. 




A SCRAMBLE at third base found 
Kempsvflle's Steve Hanson (top) and First 
Colonial's Denny Ogle tangled up. Hanson 



Two vralks and an errw put runners on first and 
third with two down and Price at the |date, 

"If be doesn't do it here it's aU ovor," 
commented Chief OAch Ray Barlow as Price 
strode to the plate. Price failed to deliver, 
grounding into an inning emling force out. Things 
would get mudi darker for the CSuefe befwe tl» 
bri^tness of th^ fhul inning. 

Ah obviously tiring Lowery received little help 
from his teanunates at the start of the sbcth inning, 
A walk and two errors on rwitine {days loaded ttw 
bases witii no outs. Witti brilliant clutch pitching, 
Lowery again worked his way out of a crucial 
situation. Grain's bouncer was tunwd Uito a force- 
out at ttie plate by an alert Swecker. Smith 
grmmded to third for another force at the plate. 



could not hold the tJirow as 0^ reached third 
safely. (Sun photo by Neal Sims) 



Lowery came all ttie way backhig getting Frank 
Welch to grmmd to semnd to end ttie inning. 

WITH WELCH'S ground out, Kempsville's last 

shot at victory seemed to have graie by ttie boards, 

but Lowery's charmed life m the mound did not 

last. 
Wlwn Lowery issued his f iftti base on balls of the 

contest to start ttie sevmtti, Coacb Dick Phelps 
pulled his valiant iNit thred hurler. Tlie move 
backfired. 

Reliever Carl McDonald was given a rude 
welcome. The Chiefs greeted McDonald witti four 
consecutive singles to take ov«r the lead. McDonald 
finally rettred ttie side, but not before five 
Kempsville runs had scored on six hits, all singles. 



back 



Baysid&is sole first place resident 



BaytidelS 
Backer T. WathlngtM 3 

Bayside continued to rule the roost in 
Eastern District t>asel>aU. The Marlins won 
their sMh raccessive game and improved 
tti^ league leatUng mark to 54) with the win 
over Booker T. Washington. 

Bayside explodedfor ttieir biggest offensive 
production of Qie season, pounding out nine 
Mts. Home runs wow a big part in the Marlin 
offense as Joe Ostxtme, Tonuny Fod^ey and 
George lyner all hit for the <&tance. For die 
trio, it was their first round triniers of the 



Craig Wiesner was the tienefidary of the 
MarUns long ball airtics as he coasted to his 
^rd win of the season. Wiesner strudc out 14 
BoflkCTS in Ms route going poformance. It 
was Wiesner's ttdrd complete game of die 
season as he remained undefeated. 

KellamSGraidliy* 

CoachDonl^cciagaveRicbBlaKomarare 
disbict start Hie move paU off as the 
Kdlam rdiever wert tte dbtance to post his 
tUrd vidmv against one defeat Bloaom 
Umited Graid^ to a moe three hits in 
^ttching bis first shutout of the seasoa 

1%e Knights broke the game (^en with a 
diree-run spot in die top of the fifth imdng. 
KcUam laid moved on top widi runs in die 
second and fourifa. It matted the dghth time 
tt^ seas<Hi the Kiights had scored at teast 
five runs in a game. 

Ketlam's second place record now stands at 
4-1. Tuesday, Keikim played Kenqisvflte. 

Lake Taylors CoK 2 

The ttivag finally ran out on Cox. The 
Falcons had been the surprise team of die 
district seasoa in recent weeks widi a ttiree- 
9ime win streak, inchi<Ung a vk:tory agahat 
defendii« state champion KenqwvUte. 

Friday at Ute Taylor, the rags to rk*es 



story seemed well on its way. The l^lcons 
Ittd broken a H deadlock widi a singe tally 
in die top of dw f ifdi inning 

Bill HogMd, who came on in relief of Jack 
' Ferrdl in die second, nursed dtat lead into die 
seventh inait«. Enter relievar Barry Noe, 
who had recorded the final three outs in each 
of die last two Fakon wins. Noe's saving 
ma^c failed to worii this time, however; as 
the Titans staged a game-winning two-run 
rally hi die bottom of die sevendi. 

CoK has now fallen back to the middle of the 
pack witti a district record of 3-3. 



NorviewS 
Princess Anne 5 

Princess Araie came close once again to 
notchii^ ttiat fint win of Uk seascm, but came 
(^ en^ty-tended. The Caralien procession 
of bad hide ointinued as Norvtew dealt 
Mncess Anne anodwr one-ran defeat 6-5. 

The CavaHers had Iroken on top witti a 
four-ran bunt in tile fifdi inning Princess 
Anne's most productive inniog of die season 
netted the Cavaher a momentary 5-3 lead. 

Starttig piteher Kevin Sheehan failed to 
hoM the cushion, yiekling diree Pilot runs in 
ttw sixtti innii^. The loss was Shedian's f hst 
of die season, but dtapfieA die Cai^lier 
district record to 0-5. 



MaU74Keltam3 

Maury delivered a blow to Kellam's tide 
hi^es widi a 4 4 win at Kdlam. It was (be 
KiSghts fint loss d the district Season, 
dropi^ dion into second place. 

Pitdiing star Joe KwasiQ' suffered his first 
deftet of die season. Kwasny, who was die 
fint (rftcber in the league to record four wins, 
wait the distance for die fifdi time diis 
•easoo. In iite teast impressive performance 



of ttie season, KwasiQr H^ldsd d^t 
Cmnmodore hits. Maury paQlyea tife hits ; 
. into four nau, also a seasoi^l Jii|^ agabist 
Kwasny. 

Kellam's star pitcher aided Ms own cause 
widi his first hone run of ttie season. 
Teammate Mike Redus, leading his ckd) in 
hitting, aAied a sdo homo- in ttie seventh. It 
was not enoughas Maury starting piteher Bill 
Coclffane recorded die final out on a called 
ttdrdsteike. 



BaysiteS 
Princess Anne 7 

Bayside Coach Terry Morton was feeUng 
pretty good af to* die first diree hmingk His 
chib had exploded for eight rans in die fint 
tturee frames as Richard Kiger and Marty 
Mo(ve belted Bayskie's fint home rans (rf die 
season to key ttie attadt. 

Moore was breering toward Ms diird wbi of 
ttie season, holdng die CavaUen scoreless 
ttiroui^ dw first three innings. 

Morton was feeling so good ttiat he gave his 
r^ulars Uie day off — almost Hie roof caved 
in on Moore in ttie sixtti inning as he coddn't 
find die plate. Walking die bases loaded and 
two rans home, Moore dqiarted l<a die 
afternoon. Morton reinserted Ms regolaiaaod 
broi^t on souttipaw ace Craig Wiesno- to put 

out die v)Sg. 

Wiesner was not overpowolng, yidkUng 
four runs in two inntaigs of work, but Bi^skle 
held m tor the whi. Desi^te Ms omtrai 
troubtos, Moore earned his ttiird wUi of ttie 
season. 

CoxIGraabyS 

Cox's Barry Noe, who was qtWtfy 
becwning a sevoith inidng arttot rtwwed he 
could go more dian <Hie inniiui algatest 
Granby. Relievo- Noe «nta«d in the ttdrd 
inning to notch h^ f hit win of the season as he 




FOIST COLONIAL'S ReynoMi Dawioii 
completes Ms twti^ on m apprMch riiot, 
durtaig city toumament acttan on Mondi^. 
Dawsim sitfferedl through a mlaeraUe front 
nine at the PaMots nevor challenged for the 
city title. Earlier tai the week. Dawion carded 
a 75, but his effort was not enough at Fint 
Colonial lost for the first tlmt thli tMSon. 
(Sun iriMto by Rod Mann) 

Kellam golfers 
upset Patriots 



limited die Comets to a scant diree hita. 

TheFafcoos, led l^the hard Mtting of J(dm 
Zimmeriy, caiba from bdOnd for die win. 
Trailli« 4-1, CoK broke on tqp widi a fau^ruil 
bunt in die bottom of the fourth. 



Granbv nulled ev«i momentarihr. readdna 
Noe for a tingle tally in die fifdi inning, but die 
Fateons iced uieir ttiira sbaight dtohtet whi 
as Ztanmeriy knocked home dw dedtUog nm 
in die bottom of die sbctti hiidng. 

KempsvilteiMaMryl 

Kempsville kept dieir fading title hopes 
alive widi an impressive win ovct Maury. 
Jimmy Moore becanw die second piteher hi 
ttie distiict to whi four games u he pitdied 
his flf di cnnplete game of the season. Morne, 
who straekout 16 in his kut mouad 
a^iearanoe, continued hto power pitching, 
tanning 10 Conunodores. 

Teammate Bobby Harrison pve Moor^s 
two-hit pitching all die support it needed widi 
a two-ran taifAe in die ndddle of a duw-run 
ttiird inidng. 

Kempsville evened their (tetrict mxri at 
2-2. 

Lake Taylors 
FlrstCoiontai4 

The Patriots continued didr mkl-seasoa 
sl^, dropsb^ dieir diird coaseaittve 
distil game toLake Taylor (i4. It was Fb«t 
Cdontal's second one-ran hM in as many 
weeks as dieir record dro|»pM-|o 24. 

Darrell Doss went the distance for die 
tesera, but failed to h<dd an eariy lead. Ilie 
Titans spotted die Patriots a 4-1 tead bdore 
rallying for the win witii two-ran bunta in ttie 
third and stacdi hinings. 

Chris Swecker homCTod for Fint Ccdonial. 



Upset was high school golf's 
calling card Thuraday at 
Oceana. Fint Colonial entered 
Uie triangular match with 
Maury and Kellam as the 
undefeated district leader. 

The hopes of an unbeaten 
season slipped away from the 
^^ Patriots toi dieir final regutar 
^ season mateh of 1974. City rival 
KeUam sUpped by First 
Cdontal by a meager one stroke 
witti a team total of 323. Fint 
Cdontal's cumulative score of 
324 was tti^ highest tetal, 
durh^ a omipeddve round tills 
season. 

NorfoBt's Maury was never in 
connadoo hi die triangular 
mettr ^te Commodores 
flnished wldia team total of m. 

FIRST COLONIAL'S 
Reynolds Dawson and Kdtaim's 
Billy Wodard were even in the 
dud between dM two teams bast 
golfen. The golfers carded 
identical five over par 77's for 
medalist honon at die match. 

In odier golf action Thursday, 
Princess Ann bested Bavride, 
Cox and N^view in a 
quadrangutar mateh at Red 
Wing. For the two-time 

Boys' state 
gymnastics 

meet Saturday 

The state gymoasticf mart is 
rekindng te Virtfnta Boadi 
Foltowhig die ghris lead, the 
boys state gymnastics meet will 
be dA Saturday at Xdkm, T^ 
gh-ls state gymnastics meet was 
heM at Kenqisville in March. 

The festivltiai wiU start at 12 
p.m. and are scheduled to fliAh 
at 3:30 p.m. Admisskm is ILOD 
for adults. 

Gymnasts from all anr tite 
state wUi be eomp^i^ in ^fiA 
different categories. EvenU 
scheihded for die competition 
are dw balance beam, uneven 
parrell bars, still rinp, 
trampoline, free exercise, 
vaultiic skie horse and all- 
around standings. A team 
champion will atoo be named. 



defndii^ state champions, It 
was their third successive i 
success. ' 

The Cavaliers posted a team 
total (rf 310 to tain dM top spot, 
Bayside heM down dw second , 
spot wiUi a SS3 total. Cos (sn) ; 
and Norview (430) completed ! 
Um fiebl. : 

• 

At Sbimpy Lake, Kempsville !! 
and Rof^ Savage condflued « 
ttieir fine ptay. The ChiefB > 
combined for an eight ov«r par : 
team total of m to oa^ 
outdistance three NorfoV' 
schools. Lake Taylor at 111 waa* 
ttie only team wltttai haOtiiK 
distance of Kempsville. '$: 

Savage continued his 
personal assault on par «dlh 
anodwr sparitUnf round. The 
muKular senior Afeda round of 
five under par 67 to 
medaliat honors. 



Sports Record' 



nbWeak 



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n«* A-lO-The tai-VMnetday, Ihsr 1. 1974 

_ 



Jaycees honor 
teacher, boss 

A KempsvUte High SclMd teacher ifU howMred as 
YwM Educator of the Year and a Navy ooamaader m 
Boitof the Year laat week atthe amud awardi banquet of 

ttM Vtogbiia Beach Jayceee. 

EUudbeUi Predmore, an Enfljiah teacher at KfflqpevOle 

H^ SdMnl, was preaented a plaque naming her Young 

Eduoitor irf the Year. 

Ms. Predmore was nominated for the honor by a 
nind>er of stw^ts and associates, inchiding Wiky 
French. Kem|ieville High School principal, and Mary 
Barnes, EigUsh sopffvisor for Uie city sdiools. 

U Cnuta-. James Coop«-, UUeting and plans offtcw at 
the Naval AmpUbioos Base, UttleCreek, was presented a 
plaque and certificate naming him Boss of the Year. 



Sodomy charges 
go to grand jury 



• «> 




HEDGESTETH 



Student 
off to 
capital 

Grady Hedgespeth, 18, a 
senior at Kempsville High 
School, has won the Good 
Citizenship Award contest for 
Virginia Beach and will be 
"Congressman for a Day" 
today in Washington, D.C. 

Rq>. G. William Wlitdnirst 
(R.Va.), sponsor of the Good 
Citizewhip Award contest in Ms 
congressiooal district, called 
Mr. Hedgeqwth last week to, 
iitform him of his award 
selection. 

Rep. Whitehurst will have Mr. 
Hedgnpeth and Norfolk winner 
Tim C. Harrison, a senior at 
Norfok Acadenv. as his guests 
for a day. The two seniors will 
accompaqy Mr. Whitehurst on 
hto schedule of coi«restional 
duties during the day. 

ALTHOUGH HE knew he was 
in competition tm the award, 
Mr. Hedgespeth said he was 
"very pleased" when he 
teamed of the honor. 

He has been to the nation's 
capital "many times," he said. 
"I wish I couU go to coil^e in 
that area," he said, "when I do 
my graduate work." 

He plans to attend either Uie 
University of Virginia or 
Harvard University for 
undergraduate wok in eitiier 
international affairs or 
oompantive law, he said. 

Mr. Hedgespeth was chosen 
for tiw award on Uw ba^ of hli 
volunteer woi^k, partidpstion in 
community servicM and 
teadersUp in school activities. 

HE 18 imESlDENT of the 
school's Student Coqierative 
Assodation, past coKdubman 
and present member of Out 
Minor's Youth Council, past 
governor of Boys' State, past 
member of the Junior Civitans 
and a meodber of the National 
HwiM- Society, National 
lliespian Society, German 
Club, debate and fwensics 
teams and the Varsity Cbb. 

As a member of tlie Mayor's 
Youth Council, he was 
ii^trumental in creating 
intoest in establiriiing local 
bicycle trails. 

He is an amateur ncUtt witii 
tiie Little Theatre fd Virginia 
Beach and recently appeared in 
"Damn Yankees" for the 
theatre and in the school 
production of "Faust" 

He hdped create a program 
for inner-city youth in Norfolk 
in hu^iage a^ Uwatre arts in 
eaajiBAAoa wltti the National 
PoiBdatton of Jack and JiOs of 
kamick, a national service 
orgaainitton. 

HE WAS A prednct and poll 
wiMter in Henry Howell's 
priMmtorial cunpaign and is 
head acolyte and crudfer at 
Grace Episcopal Ctorch, 
Norfdk. 

He nwH^es to And time f w 
al hia adieol nd community 
a^vttUa by "woAlog on a S- 
hstf diQr," be lau^nd, "I have 
I marc and more bow to 
av tbne," be said. 

•nm Seed Caiaen^ Awad 
evASit ma opra to all sflsors 
is M|^ schools in Rep. 
WUIekufst's dtetrict. A 
mqpa^s MMmitlee Mteeted 




$t the Vii^aia 

•re MmaaUk 

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tavt; 



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Lee Edward Siqrdor is awaiting action of a 
grand jury which naeets Monday m diaqes of 
committing todmay wifli three tee^aged bys. 
Two of ttie is-year-old youtiis were mtnated to 
the care of Mr. Snyder, 35, under the dly's foster 
parent pngram. Theti^youtii was a trieodof 

Ibc OwlttV* 

The acti tUkptdty occurred tai the tachekr 
home of Mr. Snyder near tiie intersectioo of 
Princess Arnie ud North Stowr Roads In te 
Bade Bay area. 

Duri^ proceedivs in Juvenile Court, Judge 
Frederick P. Aucamp fduid Mr. Snyder gidlly of 
ttvee couite of contributing to ddUtquency of a 
minor. Mr. Snyder was sentenced to U moDtito hi 
jaQ and fined 9300. Each conviction carried a six 




months JaU sentence and llOOfine. Two of tiwjaU 
scotenoes »• to be wanA consecutively; the 
thhrd served omcuma^ with flw odierlwo. Mr. 
Sn^yder has noted an appeal of die mtademeanor 
conviction. 

Judge Aucamp forwarded tiie sodomy 
dutftM to Circuit Court for d^ieeltion. Mr. 
&9dM> WM releaaed imder $1400 bond pending 
fteae proeaadiflgB. 

, P^oe saU As sotany ehargea and 
caiarfbiam cJMurfM wwe pteoed agataist Mr. 
Slider Airing hivestiaitton of reporto of his 
home betaig bivglwised. 

Dturtaig Ae past two yean, according to 
autiiortttes, Mr. Slider has had five teen^iged 
boys under Ids care in tiie foster pareit program. 



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*'llfaitf Capgale 1974" will be the 
ViTginia Beach Civic Chorus 
Spring Concert Sunday and 
Monday at the Princess Anne High 
School auditorium. 

This year's concert will offer 
several firsts for Beach 'music 
enthusiasts. During the opening 
segment of the concert, the chorus, 
accompanied by the Armed Forces 
School (rf Music Concert Band from 
the Little Credc Navy Amfrtiibious 
Base, will present the first public 
performance of Paul Whear's "The 
Chief Justice, John Marshall." The 
chorus premiered the work in 
March at the Little Cre^ Base 
with the composer conducting. 

The number is a symphonic 
poem of the early life of Chief 
Justice John Marshall as a 
member of the Continental Army 
and during his work aM' a 
lawyer Narrators for the piece 
will be Henry Clarke and Lee 
Lively (left). 

THE SPRING CONCERT will 
mark the first public appearance (rf 
ttie chorus with the Navy Band. 
Both the band and the chorus will 



be uncfer the direction of Walter 
Noona (top). Accordir^ to Mr. 
Noona, it is the first time naval 
personnel and members of the 
musicians' union have i^reed to 
perform together for a paid public 
performance in the city. 

As the title '"fime Capsule 1974" 
suggests, the concert music will 
deal with music of past, present 
and future periods. The second 
half of the performance will in- 
clude choral selections from the 
musical "Godspell," as well as 
popular tunes "Turn Around," 
"The Hands Of Time," "We've 
Only Just Begioi," "Those Were 
The Days," "An Answer For Our 
Time" and "Hope For the Future." 

Though the chorus is not all male 
members of the bass section 
inclwle (above) Bruce Steketee, 
Jim Slantis, Fred Dulin, Les 
Wasserman, Heivy Claite and 
Fred Boimey. 

Curtain time is 3 p.m. for Sun- 
day's performance and 8 p.m. for 
Monday's concert. Tickets are 
$2.S>0 for adults and $1 for chUdTen 
and may be dstained at^e door or 
from any Civic Chcnvi member. 



Sun photos and text by Linda Millar 



Even ^spats[ help 
get the oven clean 



I 



i 



Few iHisbands and wives 
will admit to quarreling. 
They have other nam^ for 
it: misundei^tanding, spat, 
tiff and the dne that's really 
silly— words.' 

"Fred and I had •words,"' 
a wife may say and I can 
only think: well, I hope so. 
I'd hate to ttvink you and old 
Fred communicate with 
squeaks, t 

After all, a rose is a rose 
and a fight is a fight. A fight 
is the backside of love- 
anger takes caring, tf not, 
how come making up is so 
much fun? 

SOME FOND memories 
come out of fights. Just the 
other day my husband said 
to me, "Remember the time 
you threw the potholder in 
the air and it stuck to the 
ceiling?" * 

"Yeah," I replied 
dreimily, "that first 
apartment oS. ours had a 
very sticky celling." 

"And the time," he 
continued, "I slammed the 
car door so hard I fixed the 
clock in the dashboard?" 



Teenager 
is finalist 
in pageant 



Peggy Ann Nelson, 16, has 
been selected to be a finalist in 
the 1974 Miss National Teenager 
d Virginia Pageant. 

The pageant will be in 
Charlottesville July 27. It is the 
state final to the Miss National 
Teenager Pageant to be held in 
Atlanta in August. 

ContesUito are judged on 
beauty, pdse, personality and 
scholastic achievement, There 
is no swimsuit or talent 
competition. Each contestant 
must write and recite on stage 
an essay on "What's Right 
About America." 

She is the daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Kenneth Nelson of 
Virginia Beach. 



Christian 

Scientist 
toleiBture 



"The Sclen<» of the New 
Man" will be the subject of a 
speech by , Catherine H. 
Anwandter SiMday at 3 p.m. at 
the White Iteron Motel, 1284 
Laskin VLm^ 

Ms. Ahiandter, from 
Santiago, Chile, is a Christian 
Science teacher and member of 
the Christian Science Board cf 
Lectureship. Her speech Is 
sponsorM by die First Church 
Christ, SciiHtist, Virginia 
Beach. 

The lecture is open to the 
public free of charge. 




"Sure," I answered, *'You 
always had a way with things 
mechanical." 

FIGHTING IS a good way 
to work up the energy to do 
these really nasty chores 
around the house— like 
cleaning the oven. Give me 
one woman, one crusty 
oven, and a dash of anger 
and I'll give you a spotlMS 
oven in 15 mimites. 

Fighting enlarges the 
vocabulary too, with heavy 
emphasis on nouns and 
adjectives. It also con- 
tributes to the national 
economy. Some of my most 
expensive perfumes have 



been presented as peace 
offerings. And I can't 
remen^ber nicer 
negotiations. 

The fUi^ny thing about 
most fights is nobody can 
remember what started 
them. Or if they can, it 
suddenly seems not so 
important anymore, 

As for those couples who 
say they never quarrel (and 
the rest of us don't believe 
them) 1 can only say their 
ovens aren't as clean as 
they could be. 

The gentle voice of the 
lamb is not fully ap- 
preciated until the roar of 
the lion is heard. 




PEGGY ANN NELSON 



visftfe 

Lifestyles 



#»«cr**c««*«* 




Food M 

fWi^on ............... M 

jQwtanli^ M 






Snoring: 

That long rolling sound tan be as loud as a hungry lion sroar 



By DR. IRA ALBERT 

^^ecialtoTheSuD 

"^^e t(q;>ic of snoring has alwajw be&i a great 
MNirce for anecdotes. For example, wsme historians 
have si«^sted that the defeat of a Tran^lvanian 
Army i»troi in 1604 was caused by the (tocid«lly 
load snore of a so^. It has also b^n estimated 
ttiat abmit two-tbirda of the U.S. Pr«iteits woe 
sn(ff««, inclu(Ung WashingUn, lina^ and the two 
Roosevdts. Anecdirtesalsor^KMrt (hat Muaudim and 
ChurcMll steered fnun tfys dkwd^. 

Evm contests for sobri^ oecasiaDaUy have bea 
hdd. In 1944, Ihe New Y<rt Tlfflwi rqxMrt^ tl» 
results of a cmtest held at ttie Vet^ans 
Admi^stration iMx^ital In Boise, Idaho. The 
reigning champioo <rf 17 years was dedinmed 
because Us siting hi^ become "too joigr." 

SDMittg akotas amtrihutnl to cwiflicts betweoi 
indiv^toito- NumenNis marriages have hwl to ct^ 
with die irriUtim (rf loud snming, aiMl nd^bon 
haw ofxadcmaUy re^nted to UtigatiMi to se^ 

Snoring has sent 
battimg ne^hlKira 
to ccHvt for reliof 



relirf from snorii^ c«»flicts. Recoitly the 
Associated Press r^<Nrted an incident in which 
neigW)ors clashed ovct ttiis mufi, each rwidei^t 
stid>b(Niily reftidng *"^|jrh" wiiMlow. Acceding 
to the plaintiff, the s^^ was "a long rolling 
sound, lite thunder in the distance." 

IF WE NOW abroach the toi^c nuure 
scientifkally, we might define snorii^ as soimds 
nude 1^ vibratiims irf ttw s<rft palate and other soft 
structure in the nasal cavity and throat as air 
lAs» ova* than. VariaUes vdiich act on tti«e 
structoir» dttio* pmirate or decrrase the tadden^ 

(rfSI^I^. 

Gaietic makeup certainly scans to be a 
{X^dispoaiiig facUn- in moring sim^ structural 
weataiesses which c(»rtribute to snorii^ are (rften 
ttie remit erf heredity. One inve^atw has 
su^e^ed that comtiti^onal tendaK:ies such as 
me of the Um^e anl neck are inqMrtaot ki 
drtermining the pit^Ulity fii Ml ^mda. \fi 
«I(fiti«i, Canity wMdi is largdy lirfluaiced by 
her«c^, h^ alao beoi found to be positivdy 
rdated te umvB%. 

Age also serans to be a very impMlaiA fact(»'. 
Chikfrei fre<;piently snore became <tf pattMd^cid 
obttructin^ to tte critical tissue, ^xm-ding to (»e 
inve^ptM-,%per(»at<rf all pn^itan awn^ are 
m^ fte i^e (rf lO. &iarii^ fSHfuUy decUnes in 
ft«quency bet^raen 10 and M y^trs (tf age. After Vt^ 
^e (tf 30, UMsiiv beone m«« prevatat as a 
NMitt el M taortMt ta tke itott<# 9( te aef t 



palate and asMciated lElssuea. A number <tf studies 
have r^KHTted ttiis later finding. 

IT IS GENERALLY rqm-ted ttiat males snore 
raoe than fonales. However, thii i^rmt 
difference may have resulted from the fact fliat, in 
our Cloture, male tn<»ing is moK sociaUy 
acc^tel^ than fonale nK>ring. tf a true sex 
diffcrmce is present, there are many possible 
«cplanati(»a which rarely have be«s investigated. 

It appears that many pathological coodlticms 
|8^Hn(4e niOTi^. One tavestigator found tiiat 80 per 
Gmi (tf his inoxis^ patients had (Mher chronic 
^mi^oms nich as inlfaunmatl<n» of the tonsils and 
aden^, se^ deviattois, tumors, infectimis and 
allo^ reactions. &q»6ure to duM, »noke, fx 
otiio- irritante also \m^ to (KwtrilNtfe to ttito 
disOTtta'. 

VsstSxk^^ iKAan may also play a siq^^arting 
role. It has been sn^ested that relaxatioQ 
«]toaMes (he total amoint (tf aunii^, and one 
mi^eqiect that tiiis w(Hild result in a reducti<« of 
bdal muscte contractkn. For ttte rMSon, (me 
frauldpredtettl^ incMeice (tf msAag to be gr«it«r 
in rural arras iH«re atrew is knowm to be less Uian 
in the big dlies. In*ed, "Hie Wew Yorii Times 
anecdotaUy reported hi 19M that ^teo Uaad ted 
the lai^s« iwK^teie (tf ^wws In M New York 
aty area. wWe Itaatetteii had the ipiaU^. 

HEAD AND BODY positk» sn «^ extrsme^ 



important to this dlicusil^. Most snoring occurs 
with tlM individual on his back with the mouth open. 
Witti Uys arrangement, ah- twbuleiKe in the nose 
ai^ diroat increases, eqNKdaUy since tte to^ue 
usually tes fbUm to file tq[> (tf tiwtiffoat. Alttoigh 
moA sm»ing occius m the teck, there is stlU a 
small pr«porti(Mi which occurs in other positions. 

Some autbori teve suggested ttet sncrtaig is 
r^ted to the various stages of sle^. F(»- examide, 
(me scioitist tes suggested that nioring is more 
Ufcely to occttf during dreaming, whereas oXJoen 
teve ir(ipoBed the opposite. In a recent sti^, we 
teve found tfut ti^e m(st snoring occurs in Stege 
2 steep, tte toMioicy to snore was not signifteanUy 
differoit kic ttie variom deep stages. In otho- 
w(r(b, the pcapsx^cm ot each sleep stage ttet 
invidvM ra(Hing seon to be equal. 

Ui ttiis same rtudy, it was determined ttiat tte 
preatert amount (tf matog occurs at tiie begtaudng 
^iteju^it It has be«i si«gest^ ttet as tte n^t 
(S99SmmNG,pafB-2) 



i.oolcing for a cure? 
Try one of the 200 

patented inventions 



r, 



n«e B-2~11ie Sm-Wedneaday, May 1, 1974 



*^\ DIAL 




FOR THE FUTURE 

CANDY is being sold door-to- 
door by Camp Fire Girte in' 
Virginia Beach, now throt^h 
• May 12. The candy sale is the 
one major fund-raising activity 
of the year for the girls of the 
Tidewater Council of Camp Fire 
Girb. 

••DKKP SPACE: The 

Galaxies" is the program for 
May at the Virginia Beach 
public schools' planetarium at 
Plaza Junior High School. 
Programs are offered at 7 p.m. 
each Sunday and Tuesday in 
May. except May 7. 
Reservations may be made by 
calling 486-1971. Admission is 
free. 



A COMKDY in two acts. 
"Ready When You Are, C.B.!", 



will be presented by the 
Chesapeake LUtle Theatre 
Thursday, Friday and Saturday 
at 8:15 p.m. at the Deep Creek 
Community Center, 211 GetH^ 
Washington Highway, North, 
Chesapeake. Information and 
reservations may be made by 
calling 421-3238 or 543-6K1, ext. 
297. 

TliK ANNUAL report of the 
city. "Virginia Beach 1973: An 
Emoting City," will be shown 
Thursday at 8 p.m. at the 
annual meeting of the Virginia 
Beach Beautification 
Commission in the Vepco 
auditorium, 525 First Colonial 
Road. 

CHURCH WOMEN United of 
Virginia Beach will have a 
panel discussion on new careers 
for women Friday at 11 a.m. at 
Francis Asbury United 
Methodist Church, 1971 Great 




GIVE HER 
A 



>WMMWMM»^ 



TRULY UNIQUE 

GIFT! 

We can make a useful and decorative 
'lamp out of her favorite vase, figurine 
or trophy. The Perfect Gift for Mother's Day! 



VA. BEACH 
4724 VA. BEACH BLVD. 



tnm Mw J.M. maid* 

MON.-CAT. tiSO • S:30 - 
PRI.tN»P.M. 



NORFOLK 
3901 COLLEY AVE. 

CORNKR 40«ll a COLUCV AVK. 
MON.-SAT. ti>0-Si>0 



A ) 






Send her the FID 

Sweet Surprisd" 

far Mathers Day 



SEND IT EARLY ... 80 
THERE'S NO CHANCE 
OF DISAPPOINTMENT. 



colorful hand paint- 
ed ceramic bucket 
fillad with bright 
Spring flowers or 
plants with frath 
flowar accentt. It's 
■ gift wHh an Extra 
Touch^shc'll delight 
' inracaiying.W«can 
sand it almost any- 
whwe the FTD way. 




SWEET SURPRISE, *1S^ 
arranoMi j, yp 



# 



Neck Road. Louise Wilson of 
Friends Meeting House wiU 
moderate. A sandwich kiocheon 
will be strved. The pid>lic is 
invited to attend. 

THE ANNUAL Navy Relief 
Society awards luncheon will be 
Friday at the Naval 
Amphibious Base, Little Creek, 
Commissiored Officers' Mesa. 
Social hour is at 11:30 a.m. 
with luncheon at 12:30 p.m. Lt. 
Gen. Donn J. Robertson, 
[H-esident of the society, will be 
guest speaker. Reservations 
may be made by calUng ^9- 
9315. 

JOEL ANDREWS, harpist 
and psychic healer, will present 
a program of music and 
informal discussion Friday at 
7:30 p.m. at the Aquarian Age 
Yoga Center, 620 14th St. 
Additional information may be 
obtained t^ calling Uie center at 
425-9414. A dtmation will be 
requested. 

A WHITE ELEPHANT sale 
wiU be Friday (1-9 p.m.) and 
Saturday (10 a.m.-6 p.m.) at St. 
Matthew's School assembly 
hell, 3316 Sandra Lane off 
Indian River Road behind 
Sherry Park. All types of 
merchandise will be offej:^ for 
sale. /' 

CHILDREN'S films shown 
Saturday at 11 a.m. at two 
branch libraries are "Bear 
Trouble" and "Circus Day in 
Our Town" at the Windsor 
Woods library and "Paddle to 
the Sea" and "The Kid" at the 
Virginia Beach library. 

"TIME CAPSULE 1974" will 
be the musical program 
presented by the Virginia Beach 
Civic Chorus, directed by 
Walter Nopna, Sunday at 3 pm. 
and Monday at 8 p.m. at 
Princess Anne High School. 
Tickets are $2.50 for adults and 
11 f(B- children, available at the 
door or from *iiy chonia 
member. 

AARON WHITE, 6^yair-old 



428-2901 
HOWERS-WAYNE JONES 

329 LASKIN RD. 
VA. lEACH. VA. 



THINK! 

ABC Contract 
Cleaners, Inc. 

hirfenioBaily Trained &npk>y«et 

THINK QUALin 

THINK SERVICE 
THINK ABC! 

Special on Dual 
and Steam 

Carpet Cleaning. 

For Free Estimates 

CALL 499-2715. 



'S*te 




i 



S) 



TO HAVE AND TO HOLD 

Y<Nir weddii^ u a day to remember, and Portraits by Toms is 
in die memory Inianess. For those ^>ecial moments you want 
to Urt foi«ver, tf»e cheridied memories of your wedding will 
never faife when you htm profes^nal photographs of those 
special mpm^ita by Torres. To have the bert . . . need not be 
expensi^. - t 



«^«4ITS TORRESt 

4221 ^rpnia Bexh BW. at Tlialia - Phone 486-5416 



Virginia Beach pianist, wiU 
present a recitaL Sunday at 4 
p.m. at ttie Chrysio' Museum 
theatre, Norfolk. Works by 
Persichetti, Bartflk, Satie, 
Beethoven, Mozart and 
Prokirftev will be included. 
Tickets are $1, available at the 
door. 

WOMEN in Communications 
Tidewater chapter, will meet 
Monday at 7:30 p.m. at the 
Hampton Redevelofsnent and 
Housii« Authority, 26 S. King 
St., Hampton Women and nwn 
in all communications f ieMs are 
invited to attend 

BLOOD DONORS are adted 
to give blood Monday when Uie 
Red Cross Bloodmobile visits 
the Vii^nia Beach campus of, 
Tidewater Community College 
at Camp Pendleton. The Cirilege 
biology chib will sponsor Uie 
Uood drive. 

FOSTER PARENTS program 
of the city of Virginia Beach will 
be the subject of a talk given by 
social worker J. P. Parry at the 
May 8 meeting of the Princes 
Anne Plaza Civic League, 7:36 
p.m. at Plaza Junior High 
School. ' 

AUTHOR, theologian and 
speako- Dr. Norman Vincent 
Peale will speak at a dinner 
May 8 at 7 pm. at Scope. Dr. 
Peale's appearance is 
sponsored by the Tidewater 
chapter, American Imtitute of 
Banking. Reservations may be 
made by calling Jan Schindler 
at 428-3333 or 428-2530. 

SAVINGS BONDS will be 
presented by Rep. G. William* 
Whitehurst (R-Va.) to chiMren 
in the savings bonds program at 
Windsor Woods Elementary 
School May 10at9:30a.m. in the 
school cafetorium. 

THE ANNUAL meeting of the 
. Virginia Society of Omitholagy 
will be May lO and 11 at the 
Mariner Motor Inn, 57th Street 
and Oceanfront. The meetog is 
sponsored by the Cape Henry 
Audubon Society. 

" "KALEIDOSCOPE of, 

'Dance" will be the program of 

ttie Virginia Beach Civic Ballet 

performance May 11 (8 p.m.) 

and Miv 12 (8 p.m.) at Plaza 



i^v. 



^p4lniVHivi^i^ 



HP mim n 



Junior High School. Tickets an 
|2.se for a(hato and $1.2$ lor 
chifakren, avaUabte at tfie Amr 
or in advance by calling R. 
Timlin at 428-7590. 

A GARAGE SALE sponsored 
by the Sirimwrine onioen' 
Wives Club will be May U ftrom 

10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Navy. 
Fleet Recreation Center/ 
Han^>t(m Boulerard and Kth 
St.. N.Street, Nrafolk. The sale 
benefits the Dolphin 
Scholarship Foundatioa 

THE THIRD annual Ghent 
Art PesUral, spoosored 1^ the 
Norfoflc PreeClinc, will be May 

11 and 12 in Stockley Gardens, 
Norfolk. Artists wishing to enter 
the show may call the NorfoOi 
Free Clinic at 625-3444. 

"STEREOTYPES <rf Womoi 
in Literature" will be the 
subject of a talk by Okl 
Dominion University Instructor 
Tania Modleski May 14 at the 
meeting cf the Vir^nia Beach 
chapter of the National 
Organization for Women, 7:30 
pm. at Bayside Presbyterian 
Church, im Ewell Road. 



FOR THE RECORD 



EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 

members of the Students 
Cooperative Association of 
Kellam High School were 
recently elected for the 1974-75 
school year. They are: 
|x-esident, Doug Meeks; vice- 
president, Karen Nichols ; 
secretary, Jackie Robertsmi; 
treasurer, Terri Anderson, and 
reporter-historian, Vickie 
Lancaster. 

KINDERGARTEN age 
artists competed recently in the 
fifth annual kindo-garten art 
show sponsored by the 
Kempsville branch public 
library. Three private 
kindergartens had 94 entrants. 
Russell Stewart of Westwood 
Hill Day school won best in 
show. 

Items may be submitted to Sun 
Dial, by maa. Please mail your not- 
ice 4o Sun Dial, Virginia Beach Sun 
138 Rosemont Road, Virgi/Ua Beach 
ya, 23452. DeacBine is noon 1^- 
day prior to the week of fmblic- 
atioH. 




OF THE YEAR 



^ 




N 



AGCOIi6£l)OrHU.nM 

THBSl'ltiG 

WINNER OF 7 AOkDEMY AWARDS 




.. ... mm—^^ 



MALE DANCERS of the Vlrgbiia 
Beach Ctvlc BaUet reheane thdr 
part in "Kaleidosci^ of Dance," to 



be presented May 11 and 12 at Plaia 
Junior High School. (Son photo by 
RodJMann) "" 



'KalBidoscopeof Oance' 
is spring ballet program 



Hie Virginia Beach Civic Ballet will 
pres«ita "Kaleidoscq)e<rf Dance" May 11- 
12 at Plaza Junior High School, 3M0 S. 
Lynnhaven Road. 

Tlw annual spring recital Ux the 
c<»npany, the ballet will feature classical 
ballet, jaz2, modem and character dance. 
The Civic Ballet's production has a budget 
of $3,500 for costumes, making it the 
highest budgeted performance in ttie ballet 
company's history. Lavish costumes have 
be«i designed by Robert Weaver. 



The recital is under the direction of 
Miec^slaw Morawski, artistic directtn- of 
the Civic Ballet. Dancers featured in the 
performance are Linda Searls, James 
Amlnrose, John Medlin, aiirley Oakes, 
D^l^ Benvin and Petra Wirth. No dancers 
outiride the Qvic Ballet are behig brou^t 
in for this perfwmance. 

Admission to the ballet is $2.50 for adults 
and $1.25 for children. Tickets will be 
available at the Plaza Junior High box 
office, or advance tickets may be obtained 
by calling 426-7550. 



Snoring 




^Continued ftom pagt B-1) 

{Togresses, there seems to be a 
shift from mouth breathing to 
nose breathing, thus maUng 
snoring less likely. In some 
individuals, this physiological 
adaptation may not occur, and 
snoring n^y persist the tetire 
night 

IN VIEW OF the evidence on 
die causes of snoring, numerous 
techniques have evolved for its 
cure. At last count, nearfy 200 
inventions have been patented 
with the U.S. govemmmt for 
the relief of snoring. 
Unfortunately, none of ftese 
devices has been successful for 
the majority of cases since the 
vartables affecting snoring are 
sodivwse. 

About the time of the 
American Revolution, it was 
suggested that snoring couki be 
cured ivy the insertion cf soap 
into the offender's mouth whidi 
resulted in temporary 
strai^lation and awakening. 
Whistling is a home ronedy 
which has been alleged to cure 
snoring without causing the 
snorer toawakea Many devices 
for snorii^ therapy force the 
person to keep the mouth sinit, 
dnis reducing the vcrfume of air 
passing over the soft palate and 
uvula. Chin straps and braces of 
many varietieB have (rften found 
tlKir way to die patent office. 

Still other teclmk]ues punish 
die patient for sleepii^ on the 
back. Several inventions consist 
of balls which are strapped to 
the back and cause discomfort 
at the appropriate times. Other 



devices automatically trigger a 
noxious sound whenever the 
individiial lays on the back. 

LIFE MAGAZINE.in 1949, 
suggested a snoring cuff which 
attached a prone subject's hand 
to Uw headboard of the bed. 
Leatfaor straps have also been 
suggested to kafep the cuff in 
place. Thb tsst teclauque is 
often successful in producing a 
reduction of snoring, usually at 
the expense of a sound night's 
sleep. 

On rare occasions, physicians 
have attempted to reduce 
snoring through various 
songical procedures. In smne 
clinical caam Ae uvula has 
been an^tated, while other 
pnictitiaoerB have att«i4>ted to 
increase tbe ri^dity of ttn soft 
palate through the injection cf 
various materiab. However, 
little niccess has been adiieved 
with eitho- at these techidqoes. 

Certain exercises of the jaw 
and Umffie muscles may be 
helpful in certain cases. 
Tightening of certain muscles 
may be helpful in keeping the 
mouth closed and thus in 
reducing the amount of snoring. 

ANOTHER POSSIBLE 

therapeutio technique might 
bivolve the use of l^noais. If a 
snoring subject has high 
hypnotic susceptibility, (me 
might give the subject a post- 
hypnotic suggestion that he 
rinuldattendmoredo^ tohis 

own snMng, or one migid 
tatsmt Uiat he diouUI ^ep on 
his stcnaach. To our knowledge, 
tiieee possflsilitin have never 



been investigated. 

It has been estimated that 
snoring sounds may on occasion 
reach an intensity of 70 
decibels, a sound levd wMch is 
rou^y equivalent to a hungry 
lion's roar. Iroiicalfy, however, 
the snorer is usually not 
disturbed by the loud poi«» that 
he emits. This pbeifomferion 
might be ejqilained by tiie 
sleeper's adaptation to a sdf- i 
produced riwttunic stimuhu. 

As can clearly be seen, 
snoring is a complex proldem 
which is influenced by 
numerous internal and extomal 
conditions. At present, 
Uwefer^ there is no universal 
cure for ttiis disordo'. However, 
researdi on tills topic offos Oie 
hope tiut tiie snoring problem 
will eventually be solved. 

Dr. Ira Albert ti m auiitna 
profestor of ^ydtolt^ at Old 
DomMon IMvenlty. This artick 
was written with Ote M of 
Nicholas C Bdlat, a retetrch at- 
ibUmt In the Depmtment of 
Ptydit^ogy. 



GIVE YOUR WIFE OR MOTHER 
THE PERFECT GIFT FOR 
MOTHER'S DAY . . A VACATION! 

SAIL FROM NORFOLK 
SS ROHERDAM 

Registry Netherland Anttlies - ,tiMi. 4, 1975 - if^t^i • 6 
Ports - St. John.'Si Lucia, BartwMtos, Martinique, St. 
Maarten, St. Tlramas. 

IF HIE ABOVE DATE IS NOT CONVENIENT, WE WILL ffi 
MOST HAftV TO ARRANCX A HCHJDAY FOR YOUt PAR- 

ncinjuiTiiiE. 

CALL NOW FOR RISiRVATIONS 
•55-4709 

MARTHA BLAIR TRAVEL SERVICE 

i03 JANAF EXECLrri VE BLDG. 
J AN AF ajOWNQPLAZA 



CiH.nCiH 



TOP GIRL 
ATHLETES 

Loretia Bunting and Nancy 
Dmoch, are among four 
students at Longwood College 
who have been chosen to appear 
in the 1974 edition of 
"Outstanding College AtiiletM 
of America." 

Ms. Bunting is the dai^bter of 
Bfr. and Mrs. Alwyn R. Buntiitf. 
She is a 1970 graihiate of Frame 
CoK Hi#i SdMwL' 1^ is on 
several varsity atUetic teams. 

Ms. Dmoch is tiw dtaughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Join Dmoch and 
was a 1971 graduate of Fnrk 
CcK idgb School She is a 
meml)er of the Longwood 
varsity hodcey team. 

Both girls are physical 
eAicatioa nMjdQNmd mMdwrs 
of the Alfdit S^ima Tau sodal 
sorority. 



m \\ IN S\l MN 



Shampoo C Sat from $3.45 

Compl«l« l««rmonar»i Wovw...„...«....$6.95 lo $1».95 

Roux Foi»ci-Tor»a Touch-ifl> from $500 

Roux Fro*fl»»9 (Ihompoo t $•» Ixfro) $12.50 

(taircut • 42.75 (long tteir $3.50) 

No Appmntm^t Nece$$ary - Jmt Come In 



HIU.TQP 
DAILY -8 TIL 6:» 




na. N*xt !■ sifMwy 



DAILY - 9 TIL 6 
THURS. - 9 'TIL 9 



sua va. 
AcroM ^om OEX 
Mom* 4t7-t7M 
V*. 



NnAMZwiW 




You can plan yoia- future 
tothedime.Simpl]H^ , 
up for the PayrotiJ^ings 
Flan. An amount you 
specify will be aut(»nati- 
cally set aside eadi myday 
to miv U.S. Savins jBonds. 

With Bomb what you 
save is what ymi get. Plus 
interest. Ncrtnit^s roan 
secure and depeimable. 

Ask your payndl pec^le 
to get you started r^t 
away. You'll be richer 
later. And feel good. And 
warm. And secure. 







^^^mm^mmmgmmgB 



^ 



^ 



^« 



FOOD 



Price specials are 
results of supply 




The Sun-WedncKlay, Miy 1, 1974-ftBeB-3 




An Qver-abuiukince of food? 
It's happmng now with certain 
food items, reports the U.S. 
pepartrtient cH[ Agriculture 
hJSDA). The USD A says five 
foods ar« in temporary 
abundai^ mi^y : beef, turkQrs, 
caM>B^, oirions and eggs. 

This atximiaBee is r^ected in 
many money-saving specials 
now being advertised. Be^ 
specials center around the 
round ami chuck sections while 



the best buys in turitey are 
Urkey breasts. 

Catk)a«[e orices will tempt 
many a cide slaw eater. Onidis 
(tffer zip to any meal at a lower 
(Mice tag then ip previous 
montllfi. 

THERE'S A new ve^taUe 
crop coming from Florida. 
Some nfiarket tests have shown 
the new carrettes, small carrots 
which ffov to about the size of a 



medium-shed human fin^r, 
are bang accepted more and 
more by consumer. They're 
said to be juicer and more 
tender than larger carrots. 



Carrettes have other braefits, 
too. It is easier to pcH-tion size 
them into mrau requirements 
l<« salads, and they're small 
oMxif^ to be served without 
slicing. 



r 



Guocamole AAonterey ^ ^'P *»' ^^ 



1 .voeado, m«sh*d ^4 toMpoon cHoppcd chlv.. 

1 tomato, chopped lln* Vi teaspoon aaN 

Vt cup cottag* or eraaro ehaaaa D"»'' P«PP»' 

1 taWaapoon lamon iuica Oaah Worcaatofahlra aauca 

2 tablaapopna choppad graan ontons 

CdmWna all mgradlanta thoroughly. Chill. Sarva on latluca with paalad, chHtod tomato wadga 
or uaa as a dunk mixture. YtoM 2 2/3 cups (about • aarvlnga). 



V_A 



V 



Early 
shopping 

is easy 



Remember the Friday night 
wedtly shopping trip? It seems 
to be a thing <A the past. 

For one thing, it has been 
expanded. - Many 

shoppers no l<Higer make trips 
to the store the same night each 
week. Many retail stores have 
• influenced this change by 
varying the day of release for 
advertised specials. 

Wednesday or Thursday's 
daily paper was always full <rf 
red-hot food bargains offered 
Uhtil d| er^'of ihe wedc. Now 
many stores, both large chains 
and independents, run price 
specials for one full week. It 
seems there's no excuse for 
missing a bargaia 

EARLY WEEK shopping 
trips are full of surprises. 
Shoppers may have the store to 
themselves. There's time to 
look over all the products lining 
the shelves, and clerks are 
much easier to find and very 
willing to assist shooters. 

Because there are fewer 
pe<^e in the store, the food 
items will usually be in good 
supply. Ite ultimate reward of 
early-week shopping is in 
checkout lane. Lines are almost 
non-existent. Food shopping 
does not have to be a hassle if 
it's done early in the week. 

Chedc local food ads to see 
when local stores advertise and 
how long sale prices are 
honored. 

While you're shopping this 
wedE, plan to take advantage of 
some of the foods in tempwarily 
abundant supply. Lodi for 
lower prices and advertised 
specials on these itenw. 



_^_ (AdvHtiiemeiit) ■ 

FOOD 

FOR 

THOUGHT 

By PAUL ROMAN 

The next time you have 
steak, try nuirinBting it in 
French Dressir^ for about 
hour, tiien brml as 



'i 



an 

iMual! Great Ball of Fire! 

Piece of egg shell in that 
'^oken egg? Dmi't use your 
fingers or a spomi to fish it 
out, it will ev&de you. Use 
half of the empty egg shell, 
it will cnne out cm the first 
try. 

Hil^ prices are 
tronendous! Try powdered 
miB for your next batch <A 
gravy. Tastes great and 
saves a considerable 
amount of money that 
couki be spent eating at the 
Cir cle "C". 

FOR AN ENJOYABLE 
MEAL • Sn^TULIZING 
IN CHABBROILED 
STEAKS, MEXICAN FOOD 
AND M>W, LOW PRICES 
TRY THE 




my USKW Mm J 



Gaskins 
engagement 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren C. 
Gaskins of Virginia Beach 
announce the engagement d 
their daughter, Cathy Lynn 
Gaskins, to Mark William 
Martin, Uie son of Mr. and Mrs. 
B.S. Martin Jr. of Vii^Bia 
Beach. 

The bride-to-be is an honMf 
graduate of Princess Anne Hi^ 
School and currently attends 
Old Dominion University. 

Her fiance also is an honor 
graduate (A Princess Anne High 
School and currently attends 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 
Bladcsburg. 

An August wedding is 
planned. 

Wood 
engagement 

Mr. and Mrs. John Clayton 
Wood Jr. of Virginia Beach 
announce the engagement of 
their daughter, Mary Ellen 
Wood, to Bemd Petersen, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Bernd Thomas 
Petersen of Plon, West 
Germany. 

The bride-to-be is a graduate 
of Cox High School and East 
Carolina University, 
Greenville. She is a teacher at 
Carolinum Gymnasium School, 




MISS GASKINS 

Osnabruck, West Germany. 

Her fiancfe is a graduate of 
Intematsgymnasium, Plon, and 
currently attends the 




Uidverslty of Mtmster, West 
Germany. 

An August 3 wedding is 
planned in Norfolk. 



Venner engagement 



iHK 



Dr. and Mrs. Robert 
Browning Venner of Virginia 
Beach announce the 
engagement of dieir daughter, 
Sarah Elizabeth Venner, to 
Hughes Jennings Rhodes III, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Hughes 
Jennings Rhodes II of 
Burlington, N.C. 

The bride-to-be is a graduate 
of Kellam High School and Elon 
College. Her fiance is a 
graduate of Eloh College where 
he was a member of Sigma Phi 
Epsilon fraternity. He is 
employed by Belk Beck Co, of 
Burlington. 

A June 8 weckling is planned. 



puTiii 



425-9335 



' 'oriental ARTS & CURIOS 

HOURS: 10 a.ni. TO 5:00 p.m. 
CLOSED SUN. <t MON. 



716 FIRST COLONIAL 
HILLTOP WKST 

(BtfliinU McDonalds <in l.aiikin Kd.) 



^ GOMER 

s pytE 



5:30 PM 



WEEKDAYS 




WiOi extension phones^ 
you can hear eveiyone snme 




When the phone rings, sometimeis it's 
for everyone. 

That's when you need more than one 
extension phone. 

So everyone can hear everyone else smile. 

Extensioprphones come in modem styles 
like the Trimline* and Princess* phones, and 
in colors that help brighten up the kitchen. 



the bedroom, the den, or wherever they go. 

Which is wherever you want. 

Just call your local C&P Telephone 
Business Office. 

It's so good to hear you smile. 

@C&P1elephone 




«a 



THE 



BGjLD ONES 




weekdays 11 PM 



^^mtmmm 



mm 



mgmm 



Reli gion 



P»ge B-4-The Sun-Wednesday, May 1, 1974 



Anti-abortion move expands 



NEW YORK— The Roman Catholic campaign to 
overturn the Su{H-eme Court decision legalizit^ 
abortions has taken a new tack, and it is being 
joined by spdcesmen for some Protestant and 
Jewish groups. 

The notion that Catholics stand virtually alone in 
opposition to the termination of unwanted 
pregnancies has faded as more and more people 
outside that faith have stood up to be counted amoi% 
the anti-abortionists. 

Moreover, the campaign has been expanded to 
include the equal "right to life" of the aged and 
infirm, the crippled and maimed, the retarded and 

IN OTHER WORKS. q>position to abortion has 
become part of a general program fighting 
euthanasia, "genetic engineering" and in some 
cases birth control. 

Some groups, principally Catholics, are assuming 
a positive stance by conducting programs to help 
expectant mothers in distress through their preg- 
nancies. Abortion is never mentioned on way or ano- 
ther by organizations such as Birthrif^t, which 
provide homes, financial aid, medical care and 
postnatal counseling. 

The principal activity in (^position to abortion is 
fiQumiin the several attemi^ afoot to push passage 
of a constitutional amendment declaring the fetus to 



be a person under the law and having a right to life. 
Another proposed amendment would simidv return 
jurisdiction to the states, whore anti-abortionists 
would hope to regain passage of the old limitii^ 
legtelation. 

THESE EFFORTS are a direct result of the 
^preme Court's January 1873, decision legalizing 
a wcnnan's right to have an abortion anywhere in 
the United States if she wants one. Thousands have 
been performed since— exactly how many no one 
knows, but the figure is generally believed to be 
high. 

So far as the Roman Catholic hierarchy in the 
UnitedStates is concerned, the ruling must go. Four 
cardinals recently testified befwe a Senate 
subcommittee that the C(mstilution should be 
amended to prohibit abortion, nullifying the court's 
action. 

"The prohibition against the direct and 
intentional taking of innocent luman life should be 
universal and without exception," declared 
Humberto Cardinal Medeiros of Boston. 

JOHN CARDINAL KROL of Philadelphia 
asserted that every week since the Supreme Court 
ruled there have been as many "deaths" from 
abortion as there were at Nagasaki as the result of 
the atomic bomb. Responding to those who urge 



abortions at least for the victims of rape, he said: 
"The victim of rape survives. The victim of 

abiHlion does tuA." 
OUier cardinals concurring generally with Krd 

and Medeiros were Timothy Cardinal Manning of 

Los Alleles and Jdm Cardinal Cody of Chicago^ 



JOINING WITH the Catholics is the Lutheran 
Church-Missouri Synod, which has Issued a 
statement reemphasizing its stand against 
ab(»-tion. The synod's Commission on Theology and 
Clnirch Relations stated: 

"Without a doubt one of the most crucial issues 
[H-esently facing almost every citizen of our country 
is the attitude toward human life, not only the life of 
the child yet unborn, but also the life of the aged and 
the terminally ill, and of all those who may seem to 
be a burden to family and society." 

The debate over abortion is by no means one- 
sided. There is still a highly vocal body of those who 
favor legalized termination of pregnancies. The 
pro-abortion forces, which include officials of the 
United Church of Christ, the United Presbyterian 
Church in the U.S.A^ and the Baptist Joint 
Committee, among others, hold that the denial of 
legal abortions would result in increased deaths of 
the mothers and child abuse and abandonment, and 
larger welfare case loads. 



il 



1 

w 







CEDA^ WOOD 
PINEWOOD GARDENS 
GATEWOOD PARK 
GREAT NECK VILLAGE 
REGENCY APTS. 
BELLAMY MANOR 
WOODHURST 

THALIA GARDEN 

APTS. 



NEWSPAPER 

CARRIER BOYS 
AND GIRLS 

MUST BE 12 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER 
^^ If you would like to earn extra 
money and live in any of the 
areas listed below, call 
486-3430, Monday thru Friday 

THESE ARE THE AREAS 
WHERE CARRIERS 
ARE NEEDED 

72nd ST. AREA 
(OCEANFRONT) 

CARDINAL ESTATES 
59th STREET AREA 
WASHINGTON SQUARE 

ARROWHEAD 
CAROLANNE f ARMS 
AVALON HILLS 
CHANTICLEAR APTS. 

KINGS ARMS APTS. 
GREAT NECK MANOR 



CaH today and start earning that extra moneyrlght nowl 
486-3430 circulation 



Religion Page Sponsors 



Estate gift added 
to seminary chair 



A gift of $78,000 from the 
estate of F.S. Royster Jr. of 
Virginia Beach has been added 
to the F.S. Royster Chair of 
Christian Missions at Union 
Theological Seminary, 
Richmond. 

The university chair was 
established by F.S. Royster Sr. 
of Norfolk in 1916. Mr. Royster 



was a trustee of Union 
Seminary. His widow and their 
children have added additional 
gifts to Uie chair through the 
years. 

The junior Mr. Royster 
stipulated through his will that 
the latest gift be added to the 
chair endowment created by his 
father. 



Peale speaks at Scope 



Dr. Norman Vincent Peale, 
noted author, theologian and 
speaker, will speak at a public 
dinner May 8 at 7 p. m. at Scope. 



Reservations for the dinner 
and additional information may 
be obtained from Jan Schindler, 
428-3333 or 428-2530. 




PRICE'S 

INCORPORATED 

BRAND NAME 

AppUaneeM 

rv Stereo 




ASPHALT 

ROADS 

& 

MATERIALS 

Phone - 497-3591 



PRINCESS ANNE 
EQUIPMENT CORP. 
S04 S. Military Hwy. 

Virginia Raach, Va. 
Phona 420 -1840 

Jolm Deere iqulpment 



CONTRACTORS 
PAVING CO. INC. 

3779 Bonnlfy Road' 
Phone - 340-1161 




Sunrise gathering 



The sun peeked through the clouds 
Easter Sunday as Beach residents 
and friends gathered for sunrise 



services at the foot of tjieCape 
Henry Memorial Cross on Ft. Sk^^ 
(Sun photo by Rod Mann) 



CHURCH NOTES 



A YOUTH REVIVAL was held 
last weekend at Trinity Baptist 
Church, Norfolk, including a 
special Sunday morning 



service. The revival was led by 
the Baptist Student Uiuon d Old 
Dominion University and the 
young people cf the church. 



Need help? Phone-in TV 

TOO CLUB 

featuring 

Pat Robertson 

8PM weeknight 





9 STRONq 

chuRchES 




MAkE STRONq 



• • 



COIVIIVIUNITIES 



AN ANTHEM celebrating tlw 
annual church-wide mission 
study at Virginia Beach United 
Methodist Church was 
premiered at the church 
Sunday. The anthem, "Reach 
Far, Reach Near," was 
composed by Doug Thompson, 
president cf the church's youth 
fellowship, wiUi words by Doris 
Wolfe, chairman of flie church's 
work area on missions. 



OFFICERS of the Norfolk 
Disb'ict of the United Methodist 
Church, representing 52 area 
United Methodist Churches, 
were recently elected. They: 
president, the Rev. David F. 
Jarvis; vice-in'esictent, the Rev. 
Charles L. Winfree, and 
secretary; treasurer, William C. 
Logaa 



THE ANNUAL Arts and 
Flowers Show of the Unitarian 
Church of Norfolk will be 
Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
and Sunday from 12:30 to 4:30 
p.m. at the church on the 
Hague, 729 Yarmouth St. For 
sale will be all types of plants 
and flowers, paintings, crafts 
and baked goods. 



iS# 



BANK' ^_ 

OF VIRGINIA BEJ^H ^/^ 

Offices Throughout Virginia Beach 

425-5077 
FIrsf \r% Free Checking 
First in Saturday Banking 



THERE IS A 
DIFFERENCE 

TRY 

Beach Ford 



KEMPSVILLE 
PHARMACY 

5266 PRINCESS ANNE RD. 
VIRGINIA BEACH, VIR61NIA 
497-3516 



A THOUGHT 

TODAY ^ 
MAY 1, 1974 ' 



Rev. CharlM H. Jonei 
Mnitter, Kemptvyic Bqttitt 
dutcli 



The "Hai^iip" pnUHn is 
Rally • "Hook-up" pioMraii. 
To hook-up Witt Oiiitt «W 
end yoiu hang-up. 



BAYUKE UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 

4300 i%oie Drive 
Va.leadi - 444-2423 

Byron S. Hallstead - 
Minister 

^NDAY SERVICES 

Ckuch School 9:30 AJL 
llacn^Wa^# llsMlLM. 
VISTORS MiE WEKOME. 



UEL TABERNACLE 
lURCH-lJPC 
1S7 Monnon Ave. 
(1 Mock off S. Lynnhavm iU.) 
Rev. Harold Hiilion-Putm 
Fhone: 340-7333 
Aiflday School • 10:00 AJ4. 
FMSching - 7:30 P.M. 
Wedaeid^ 7:30 P.M. 

BiMe StBdy 
"^veiyoiie Wtteome, Omiw. Jw 
Wofri^t WMi Ui" 



KEMPSVILLE 
BAPTIST CHURCH 
S204PiiBccafAMieRoMl 
Rev. Chuie* H. lones 
PMtor 

teiidwS<diooi-9:4SAJN. 

Wonh^-ll:00AJ4. 

TMi^Uaion-6:lSP.M. 

^reiiiag Wof*9 - 7:30 P.M. 

Wedaeiday Evubii • 7: IS PJI. 

fayn Meeti^ nd BlUe Study 



TIDEWATER CENTRAL 
CHURCH OF THE 
NAZARENE 

Rev. Itevtd HoMein, hotor 

S514 Payment Ph. 497-8703 
SmdKf SdM»l Hi. • 9:45 A.M. 
How of Tiiamph 10: SO A.M. 
Jvnior, Youdi, lb Adult 
hOoarrii^ - «:00 P.M. 
Hour of iaq>bmtfoa - 7:00 P.M. 
WadMad^ Md-week 
l^»4ft 7:30 P.M. 



ROCK CHURCH 

640KempsvUleRd. Ph. 499-3727 
Vu^nit Beadi 



m 



f^*^2L 



Sunday 

Swiaay School V:4S A.M. 

Mornina \Wor>lilp 11:00 A.M. 

EvmMia WortHIp >:J0 P.M. 

TttcMlay 

Mornina Werthip IO:M A.M. 

Evraina Worikip 7:30 P.M. 

Tliuriday 

Mornina WorHlIp l«:M A.M. 

E««nin« Worriiip 7:N P.M. 

Nurwry A»»ll»at« 
PASTORS 

Rov.JohnOiffltnoi Rov ABnOlmenoi 



FIRSTCHURGH 
OF CHRIST 
SCIENTIST 
Vir«lnia Beach 
1341 Laskin Rd. 
Sunday 
Church Service ii:«« AM 
Sunday Scheel 11:0« AM 
Wednesday 

Testimony Meeting 1:04 
PM 

Christian Scientist 

Reading Room 

(same address as above) ■ 

Moirfay thru Saturday - 

n;eeamto3:MPM 

Also Open Tuesday Evening 

7:00 PM to 9:00 PM 

Everyone Is welcome to 
Study, Borrow, ar Buy 
Authorlied Christian 
Scientist Literature and the 
King James Version of the 
Bihle. 



AsatttMy of ( 

(Cornel Va. Beach Blvd. 
Oceana Bhrd.) ~ 
S.Bd«,Paatar 

428-5297 



ChrlsMan Scientist 
is also avallaM*. 



Monitor 



EMMANUEL BAPTIST 

CHURCH 
4750 Baxter Rd.-Va. Beach 
PMot: W. F. Gtandataff 
Phone: 497-4208 

&nday School: 9:45 AJiL 

(AUAfM) 
hMchl^Savice: 11:00 AJL 
Evci^ PnaeMiv: 7:00 PJI. 
Wedaeai^ 7:30 PJI. 

VmM Yoafli ActMtiea 



WELCCME TO WORSHff 

ANDwriKEfflwrni 

ST. MARK A.M.E. 
CHURCH 

J. Alton Butte, Mintatcr 
1740 Pottos Rd. VbgbiiB 
Beach, Va. 

StiKiy Pbone 428*1330 
CSiiDch Sciiool • 9:^ A.M." 
OMiM Wmi^ - li:Oe AlLg 
Wsdimday. 7:00 P.M. 
Hie Teadih^ Ifintatty 
Wedneaday - 8:30 P.M. 
I "ne Chwrdi at Pn^ 



Cfi^U and 




TkilltitFa 



itaWaOiilKm' 



3teSfc 



'im. 



If you have just moved, 
It's time to <aill your 
Welcome Wagon host^s. 

Phone 340-2131 

If you ar* IntarattM in getting 
Information about batng a 
WMcoma Wagon Hostau, fill 
out tht following coupon 

NafnO: M..H....H..»....t.H..H»... 

Addr^: .._.«._-„«..• — 

Phono No,: ._ .»...».n...„ 

Mkll to: WolcoiTM Wagon 
370S KIngi- Bt. CIrcIa 
Va. Ben., Va. 234S2 



4 : 



^^■■■^■■a 



Gardenin g 



Ibt Siin-^VwImMliy. May 1. 1974-N9B BS 



Hanfy dahlms beautify any gaiden 



The dahlia is an ideal flower for the Imne garden. It 
grows vigorously and i»Y)duces aii abundance of beautiful 
flowers. Best of all, dahlias are rdatively free of disease 
and insect pests, except for Japanese beetles. Itie bloons 
are excellent for arrangements and for exhibition 
purposes! 

Dahlias are now available in many small and large 
types. You should try some of die new and attractive 
forms which have a wide range of colws. Get catalog 
from seeds people who handle this plant, or check with 
your local florist or garden center to be sure ttic^hiave 
some of the new and improved varieties. 

THE SINGLE dahlias look lUce large daisies with eight 
white or colored petals. The collarette varieties are 
similar to the singles, but have an extra row of short 
petaloids around the center disc of the flower. Orchid- 
flowered dahlias have very graceful form with eight 
petals curled into attractive pmnted tubes. 

New col(H9 and forms are also available in the double 
varieties. The large decorative types have flowers which 
are eight to 12 inches across. Ball dahlias have compact, 
round flowers fmm four to sue inches in diameter. 
Pompom types are like small balls, two inches or less in 

diameter. 

The cactus varieties are very atti'active and are 
particularly useful in flower arrangements. The florets oi 



Control of 
bagworms 

Q. How and when can I caitrol 
bagw(»rms on evergreens? 

A. For best control of bagworms treat 
in mid-May to early June when the larvae 
are young and the bags are small. Older 
larvae are resistant to insecticides. 
Tliree chemicals are recommended for 
bagworm control: carbaryl (Sevin), 
diazinon and malathion. 

Q. What causes the webbing down 
inside my fruit trees? 

A. This insect is toit caterpillar and it 
is a major pest problem on fruit trees. 
Spray trees as soon as possible with 
carbaryl (Sevin). 




(^stjons & answers abotiit lawns & gardcHis 

Q. What causes rose leaves to bronze on 
the tq)? 

A. Sounds as if the problem is on the 
undersides of the leaves. Check for very 
small crawling insects; if you look 
closely you should see spider mit^. 
Chemical control can be obtained by 
spraying with Acarben, Kelthane or 
Tedion. Spray at two to three week 
intervals, alternating miticides once or 
twice during the seasmi. 

Q. When should I plant mums? 

A. Mums should be planted anytime 
now. Remember they grow all summer 
and i»Dduce flowers in the fall. 

Hotiine mM be «<ad to arawa your quathm about fawm and 
^rdem. Send your quatima to HoOkie, Vlrgbiia Beach Sun, 
138 Rotermmt Road. VirgMa Beach. Va. 23451 




FRUIT 
TREES 



FLOWERING 
TREES 



SmOE TREES 



^^ Black Pine 10 hr '18 

Azaleas from •! •• 



BEDDING PLANTS 

i_iui j> t II ■! mn i~iii~ii~ 

Tomatoes •Peppers • Strawberries 



A^VWWW^MAAnMM* 



BSIP^ 



from 
$3.50 

Furpit Wistffria - Nydrmigfos 
Houst Plonfs • IkiiigiiHi Basktts 

CEMETERY WREATHS 




L ««»Pi«»MteiM Rd. I»hoii»<»-2«» 
Mmtey-SMwday » A.M.Mi P.M. 




eXTENSIOM DNISIOM 



the inflorescence of the semi-cactus type are curled down 
at the edges near the tip for one-fourth to one-half thdr 
length. The florets cl the straight cactus brpe are curled 
down for more than half their length, into a pointed 
tubular fonn. 



Maiv excellent dahlias should be profMgated by 
divisions of the chimp of roots because they do not come 
true to name from seeds. A piece of stem must be a ttached 
to each root when the chister is divided. New stems wiU 
develop only from buds which are present on the <dd 
stems, and not from the root. The dd root Is needed as a 
soujve of food until the new plant bec(»nes estaUished. 




DAHLIAS GROW best in a deep, fertile, wdl-draimd 
sdl in a sunny kicatian. The planto are easl^ damaged by 
cold. The chuiter of roots may be i^;»rated and {dinted at 
about the time of Oie Wit killing ft^t 

Dahlia {riants dMuld be spaced three or four feet apart if 
large exhiMtioii fkwen are desired. For smaU f kiwers in 
beds <a for cutting, the pianti may be aboit two feet 
apart. Root divisions should be idantad on the side about 
five inches deep. Cover witii about two inches of soil, and 
gradual^ fill the remainder of the hole as Um shoots 
develop. 

Adequate moisture must be provided to promote 
vigorous growth and flower production. A mirich of peat 
moss or sawdust will he4> conserve soil moisture during 
(fry periods. Eliminate all weeds which would compete 
with the (dants. FerttUit at planting time witti one-half 
cup per plant of a S-l(^ fertilizer dug into the soil around 
the dahlia. Faded flowers should be removed to encourage 
continous blooming. 

FOR LARGE blooms alkw only one stalk per root to 
develop. Ronove all small weak sprouts. When the shoot 
is about six inches tall, pinch back to about the third set of 
leaves to promote branching. Not more than four main 
branches dioukl be allowed to develop on large flowering 
varieties. As the stems grow they shoukl be tied to a stake 
to prevent breakage. 

Disbudding may be practiced to secure large blooms for 
exhibition purposes. 



Garden dub 
news and n€rtes 



AWARDS in the senior 
division went to five Virginia 
Beach garden clubs at the 
recent spring meeting of the 
Tidewater District, Virginia 
Federation of Garden Clubs at 
the Admiralty Motel, Norfolk. 
Senior division awards went to 
the Princess Anne Plaza, 
Brittany Points, Aragona, 
Windsor Woods and Birdneck 
Point clubs. Junior division 
awards were given to members 
of the Aragona and Lake Smith 
Terrace juniw clubs. Sixty 
garden clubs participated. 

"ROSES" was die topic of a 
Ulk given by Robert 
CrutehfieW, garden expert for 
the Virginia Beach Department 
of Parks and Recreation, at the 
April meeting of the Great Neck 
Garden Club. The club recenUy 



sponsored Brownie Troop 245 
for its part in cleaning up Great 
Neck Estates for Clean Sweep 
Week. 

MAY BASKETS made by 
members of the Lake Smith 
Terrace Garden Club will be 
judged today when club 
members disfday baskete on 
their front porches. A panel of 
judges will award ribbom for 
the bad(ets. 

LAWN CARE was the subject 
of a slide presentation by Dr. 
Charles Elstrodt, extension 
specialist with the VPI 
extension service, at the April 
meeting of the May Farm 
Garden Club of Kingston. The 
meeting marked the sixth 
anniversary of the dub. 



Cabbage cnps up 

Early cabbage is already up in neatly planted 
rows tended by a gardener on Princess Anne 
Road near Indian River Road. (Sun photo by 
Rod Mann) 



mm 



GARDEN PLOTS 
FOR RENT 

Hilltop Area 
(next to Zay res) 

Plots 20'x50' priiMd $20.00 til J«n. 1st. 

CALL 486-6546 




COLEMAN NURSERY 

GARDENTOWN 

"THE HOME OF CHRISTMAS WONDERLAND" 

4934 HIGH ST.(RT.17) PORTSMOUTH, VA. 

SINCE 1942 484-3426 




-»M 



Loaded wirtrBucIs 
& Many with Blooms 



WE GUARANTEE OUR PIANTS TO LIVE! 



Plant Now & En|oy 

Rose Blooms All Summor 

Priced From 

$349 TO $495 



Garden goes 
to the birds 

The rose gartten at the General Hospital of 
Virginia Beach has a new addition, thanin to the 
Virginia Beach chapter of the National AiKlubon 
Society. 

Chapter members donated a birdbath and rose 
plants to the garden. Club member Col. Joseph 
W. Viner was in charge of the birdbath project. 

The chapter apprqiriated $25 for the birdbath 
and rose plants. 




'^OiiiNr 



OSTNO-SNO 

Lawn 
Food 




Turns Your Lmn 
into Lusb, firaM 
Turf 

Thli yot hovt on* of tfw 
nicait lowni en y^uf 
bleck. Ortho-Ore town 
Feod'i eleon, oderltii 
poMiti provide feif octien 
of nvtrltnfi to turn four 
town into e Ivili, green 
tvrf. 

MMfllMMl^lf. 



BEDDINC PUNTS 



• leaanioi 

• Cmnm 

• RffipailVfB ,, 

• Portuloca • VifiM 

• ZbiniM 



$119 



per tray 




^ ■ppsr k 





niANKivWMHtl 

AnoihiiiiirilfwillKTUNIASl 
IviMioflastirawliHlllMIMS 



FOU ALL tHIIUM, fLOWlW. THUS 

IMI diy MMMntr uMd M eirMtad, ilHSSJS 



siam 



ffifcOlQlt^tote 




LAWN 
CART 

$23^ 




Bei^t by Test jor over 100 years 




IVVW 



mmmi 



B^ 



mm 



mmmmimitf^ 



-The Sun Wednesday, May 1, 1974 



I 




CandittatBs report 



^04^ campaignsxpenso 



Military 
awards 
to cadets 

The Navy Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps 
iNJROTC) unit from Frank W. Cox High School, 
directed by Cmdr. Raymond C. Newman, USN 
tliet.), has received the 1974 "Captain C.E. Caton 
Award for Excellence." The award is presented 
annually to the NJROTC unit which demonstrates 
the highest degree of proficiency in Field Day 
competition among units from each of the six high 
schools in the city. 

There was a total of 32 individual and unit awards 
presented during the competition. The Bayside High 
School NJKOTC unit, directed by Cmdr. R.T. 
Weatherly. received the drill team award. Robert 
Richards, a member of the Bayside unit received 
the "MOWW (Military Order of the World Wars) 
Cadet of 1974" award 

Some 400 NJROTC cadets, including 74 girls, 

' from the various schools took part in the Field Day. 

(iirls were members of the Cox High School team, 

and an all-girl drill team from Floyd E. Kellara 

High School gave an exhibition of drill maneuvers. 

THK CATON AWARD was established in honor of 
Capt. C.E. Caton, USN (Ret.), who initiated the 
NJROTC Naval Science program in the Virginia 
Beach school system. He formed the city's first unit 
at Princess Anne High School in 1967. 

The U.S. Navy furnishes all Naval Science text- 
books and special equipment for the course at no 
expense to students. The course is an accredited 
elective subject, offering training in subjects 
required in naval service. Th<»e who complete 
three years of training are eligible to enter service 
in the third enlisted pay grade, as well as being 
eligible for appointment to the U.S. Naval Academy 
or Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTO 
program in various colleges. Completion of the 
program does not obligate any cadet to naval 
SGrviCfi 

To be eligible for the NJROTC program, a 
student must be at least 14 years of age, enrolled in 
one of the six high schools, meet certain moral and 
idiysical requirements and pass screening tests 
administered by the Naval Science Instructor. This 
is the second year girls have been accepted into th§ 
program. Girls use the same equipment as boys 
when engaged in the training. 



Nearly $50,000 has been 
reported spent so far by 
candidates in the race for the 
Virginia Beach City Council. At- 
large candidate Patrick 
Standing led all other 
candidates reporting Tuesday 
with campaign expendituses 
totalling $9,828. 

Mr. Standing listed mwe than 
$11,000 inavailaUe revenue, but 
only two contributions of more 
than $100 from persons other 
than himself. He shows two 
campaign loans totalling $7,000. 

All candidate are required to 
file a statement of campaign 
contributions arid expenditures 
with the city Electorial Board 
no earlier than 14 days and no 
later than seven days prior to 
the election. 

Candidates who had not filed 
as of 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, the last 
filing day, . included Dr. 
Clarence Holland, Councilman 
Floyd Waterfield, Robert 



Sparrow, Drewry Little and 
Sandy Bolin. Statements 
postmarked no later than 
Tuesday will be accepted, 
according to Catherine Ninm of 
the Electorial Board. 

Both candidates in the 
Lynnhaven Borough contest 
reported q)en<ttng in excess of 
$8,000. Incumbent Vice-mayor 
Reid Ervin reported 
expenditures of $532, but 
campaign (tebts totaUii^ $8,539 
have yet to be paid. His 
opponent, John Griffin, Usted 
expenditures of $4,013 and UUs 
unpaid of $4,300, bringing his 
campaign expenses to $8,313. 

Mr, Griffin listed seven 
contributions d. more than $100 
totaling $2,450. Mr. Ervln's 
statement showed oidy three 
contributi(His (rf more tiian $100 
totalling $500. 

Dr. Henry McCoy, 
challet^ing incumbent Garland 
Isdell for the Kempsville 



Vandal damage 
2 local schools 



Floyd E. Kellam High School 
on Holland Road was 
vandalized over the wediend. 
Police estimate damage 
amounting to several hundred 
dollars. 

Investigators said the 
building was entered by 
breaking a window. The 
gymnasium supply room and 
coach's office was broken into. 
Six windows in the school were 
also reportedly broken. It 
appears nothing was taken from 
the school during the break-in. 

Authorities also are 



investigating a break-in at 
Linkhorn Park Elementary 
Schod on Laskin Road. The 
building apparently was 
entered by removing a window 
in the teacher's lounge. 

According to police, at least 
ten rooms of the school were 
ramsacked as well as a number 
of teacher's desks. 

As in the Kellam high school 
incident, it appetjrs nothing was 
taken from the school. 

Police continue their search 
for suspects in both incidents. 



School 
Board 



IN ADDITION TO classroom instruction and 
military drill training, the curriculum also includes 
sports programs other than those offered by the 
individual schools, with competition among the 
units, field trips to military installations and 
aboard Navy ships. Cadets also participate in naval 
midshipmen and ROTC cadet annual amphibious 
assault training at Camp Pendleton. 

Cmdr. Weatherly points out the program is not 
designed primarily towards enticing any young man 
or woman towards a military career. He says, 
"What we're striving to do is to make them all- 
around citizens to take on responsibility at their 
age. One of the big things about the program is it 
gives these young people something to participate 
in if they might not qualify for something else in 
the school, like sports." 

Cmdr. Weatherly added, "The Navy hopes to 
gain from this, but that is not the prc^am's 
p-imary objective." He pointed out Navy recruiters 
do not visit the units, and that a number of 
graduates of the program h^e found their training 
useful after enlistment in the Army or Air Force. 



to meet 
Thursday 



The Virginia Beach School 
Board will have a special 
meeting Thursday night at 7:30 
to discuss a proposed 
administrative reorganization 
and to hear a preliminary 
report on solutions to school 
-overcrowding. 

The meeting will be in the 
board room of the school 
administration building at the 
Municipal Center off Princess 
Anne Road. 

The meeting is qpen to the 
public. 



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HARRIS 
TIRE SERVICE 



1469 N. Military Highway 
Norfolk, Virginia 23502 
'Tfce men who know tires best 

855-6021 



Solution to puzzle on page A-4 



CISTOLA HONORED 

Thomas M. Cistola of Virginia 
Beach has been placed on the 
Dean's List at the^ Georgia 
Institute of Technology. 

Mr. Cistola, the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Horace A. Cistola, Little 
Neck Point, was recognized for 
his outstanding scholastic 
acliievement during the sec(xid 
quarter of his freshman year. 



great *>^i 
addresMS 



WORLD'S 




Jf§rp\ons 



M 



Gonv*ni«nlly loe*Md in 
Virginia Beach near Norfolk 

i froat-lree, two door 

refrigerators 
I * Mit-cleaning pvent 
diitiwaiher-dfsposal 
wall-to-waM carpeting 
air conditioning 
oversized closets 
: swimming pool 
1 tennis courts 

Rntils frM Mil 
1, 2, 3, 4, Bedroom 
Garden Apartments 
3 Bedroom Townhouses 

HAMrrONB MAYFAM 

«I7-00M' 



Borou^ sttt, reported a total 
of 17,736 spent. Mr. IsdeU 
repMied spending $1,025. 

In the Bayside Borou^ race, 
Gaynette Winter reported 
spending $1,343 on her 
campaign- to unseat Dr. 
Hdtand. 

At-large candidates reported 
the following expenditure: 
Peter Joy, $50; Edward Lynk, 
$79; Philip MuMez, |96; IMm 
McClanan, $710; Joel SmiQi, 
$1,107; Meyera Oberndorf, 
$2,163; Cecily Macdonald. 
$2,568; and Mayor Robert 
Cromwell and Councilman 
Murray Malbon a combined 
total d $4,700. 

All candidates must file a 
second statement listing 
campaign contributions and 
expenditures with the Electoral 
Board within 30 days after the 
election. 



§9 91: 



Ci.. 
stolen 



Four men have been arrested 
in connection with ,the reported 
theft (rf some $16,000 worth of 
coppv tubing from ttie city 
compound at 14th Street and 
Parle Avenue. 

Police identified the men as 
Gewge Sears, 24, 18th Street, 
John T. Dozier, 22, Pacific 
Avenue; Clement Piatt. 23, 19th 
Street and Major White, 30, 
Carver Avenue. All are 
awaiting court proceedings on 
grand larceny charges. 

Investigators said the tut>ing 
was stolen over a two month 
period and that approximately 
1,940 pounds of the stolen 
material was recovered from a 
salvage yard in the city (rf 
Chesapeijce. 

Officials said their 
investigation is continuing and 
that other arrests are expected. 



STUDENT HONORED 



Ann Louise Tarkenton, a 
Longwood College sophomore 
from Virginia Beach, has been 
initiated in the Beta Beta Beta 
Biological Society. Ms. 
Tarkenton is a biology major 
w^ing towards the bachelor of 
science degree. 

The society emphasizes a 
three-fold program of 
stimulation of scholarship, 
dissemination of scientific 
knowledge and promotim of 
biological research. 



Li04LS 



NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 

The Virginia Beach 
Planning Commission will 
hold a Public Hearing on 
Tuesday, May 14, 1974, at 
1:00 P./Vt. in the Council 
Chambers of the 

Administration Building, 
Princess Anne Courthouse, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia. 
The following applications 
will appear on the agenda: 
SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 

1. Variance to Section 
4.4 (d) fo the Subdivision 
Regulations, located West of 
0verlar>d Road. 
DEFERRED 40 DAYS BY 
PLANNING COMMISSION 
ON MARCH 12, 1974: 

2. Petition of Ocean 
island Inn, Inc., for a Change 
of Zoning District 
Classification from B-4 
Resort Commercial District 
to H-2 Resort Hotel District 
on certain property located 
at the Northeast corner of 
Jade Street and Page 
Avenue,runningadistanceof 
422.43 feet along the North 
side of Page Avenue, running 
a distance of 600 feet more or 
less along the Eastern 
property line, running a 
distance of 548 feet more or 
less along the Northern 
property nne i®»esapeake 
Bay) and running i distance 
of 533 feet more or less along 
the Western property line. 
Said parcel contains «.378 
acres (Lynnhaven Shores 
Area). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 



6 DIGIT MINI EliCTRONIC 
CALCULATOR 



• AM>S 

• »IITtACT$ 

• MVLTmiiS 

• MV»ES..INSTANTm 



24 



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l^jk^tmf^, cmnpact . . . S"x2" and km 
ftraii M" ff«kJ(. Slips into shirt pocket, 
^tionol AC pdapter for houichold cur- 
rent. Battery ind. . . . Take anywhere. 
F«% gtMranteed. 



twn 



LECTRONICS 



9 DigK MocM ... Only $29.9S 
was $39.9S 

STOIf HOURS: 10 - 9 Ddif 
Soturdoy 10 - S 

3 Soutram i h o pp i f 9§ wMiltf 
Phom SS3-26S1 



NEW 

ADVERTISING RATES 

CLASSIFIED & RETAIL DISPLAY 

$2.52 

per column inch 

NO CONTIIACrMfCfSSAffr 

"It pays to odvortlso 
in The Sun" 

CAU 4M-3430 TODAY I 
ASK FCTI ADVERTISINO, 



3. Petition of W.W.D. 
Associates by AAarsh and 
Basgier, Inc., for a Chan^ of 
Zoning District Clantflcatlon 
from R-3 Residential District 

, to B-2 Community Busineu 
District on certain property 
located on tbe Soutti side of 
Sliore Drive, beglming at a 
point 7S5 feet more or less 
West of Independence 
Boulevard, running a 
distance of 1472 feet along the 
Northern property lint of 
whidt 71S feet is the Soutti 
side of Shore Drive, running 

) a distance of 404 feet along 
the Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 1700 
feet along the Southern 
property line and running a 
distance of 750 feet along the 
Western property line. Said 
parcel contains 13.31 acres. 
Plats with nKM-e detailed 
information are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
(Lake Shores-Little Creek 
Amphibious Base Areas). 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

4. Petition of WW. O. 
Associates by Marsh and 
Basgier, Inc., for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
from B-2 Community 
Business District to H-1 Hotel 
District on certain property 
beginning at a point 585 feet 
more or less West of 
Independence Boulevard and 
267.34 feet South of Shore 
Drive running a distance of 
141 feet along the Western 
property line, running a 
distance of 341 feet along the 
Southern property line and 
running a distance of 137 feet 
along the Eastern property 
line and running a distance of 
336 feet along the Northern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 0.78 acres. Plats 
with more detailed in- 
formation are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
(Lake Shores-Little Creek 
Amphibious Base Areas). 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

5. Petition of W.W.D. 
Associates by Marsh and 
Basgier, Inc., for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
from R-3 Residential District 
to H-1 Hotel District on 
certain property beginning at 
a point 585 feet more or less 
West of Independence 
Boulevard, and 320 feet more 
or less South of Shore Drive, 
running a distance of 40 feet 
along the Western property 
line, running a distance of 341 
feet along the Southern 
property line, running a 
distance of 40 feet atong the 
Eastern property «>line and 
running a distance of 341 feet 
along the Northern property 
line. Said parcel contains 0.31 
acres more or less. Plats 
with more detailed in- 
forniation are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
(Lake Shores-Little Creek 
Amphibious Base Areas). 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
DEFERRED 30 DAYS BY 
PLANNING COMMISSION 
ON APRIL 9, 1974: 

6. Petition Of R.L. Upton 
8i Margaret I. Upton for a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from R-6 
Residential District to 0-1 
Office District on certain 
property located on the 
Southeast' corner of South 
Palm Avenue and Bonney 
Road and 200 feet West of 
South Fir Avenue, running a 
distance of 227.55 feet along 
the Northern property line of 
which 177.55 feet is the Sooth 
side of Bonney Road, running 
a distance of 394.1 feet alomj 
the Ea^ side of South Palm 
Avenue, running a distance 
of 187.9 feet along the 
Southern property line, and 
running a distance of 513.35 
feet along the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 1.9 acres. (Thalia 
Village-Southern Firs 
Areas). KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

REGULAR AGENDA 
Change of Zoning District 
Classifications: 

7. Petition of Oscar 
Lewis, Claudis hiolley and 

^ , James E. Jefferson, Trustees 
of Washington Lodge, 139, for 
a Change of Zoning District 
Classification from R-6 
Residential District to 0-1 
Office District on certain 
property beginning at a point ** 
584.4 feet North of Weldon 
Street (formerly Grace 
Street) between Frost Road 
and Eagleton Lane, running 
a distance of 82.2 feet along 
the East side of Eagleton 
Lane, running a distance of 
280 feet along the Northern 
property line, running a 
distance of 82.2 feet along 
the West side of Frost Road, 
and running a distance of 
280 feet along the Southern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 0.54 acres more or 
less. (Gracetown- 
Fentresstown Areas). 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

8. Petition by resolution 
of the Council of the City of 
Virginia Beach for a Change 
of Zoning District 
Classification from II Light 
Industrial District to AG-1 
Agricultural District on 
certain property beginning at 
a point 1333 feet more or less 
South of Adventure Trail and 
915 feet more or less West of 
London Bridge Road, run- 
ning a distance of 390 feet 
more or less along the 
Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 257.88 
feet along the Northern 
property line, running a 
distance of 371.80 feet along 
the Western property line 
and running a distance of 310 
feet nwre or less atong the 
Southern property line. Said 
parcel is known as Parcel Y, 
Resubdivision of Lot 12 and 
Subdivision of Lot 13, London 
Bridge Gardens and contains 

.-iX5 acres more or less. 

^*^(^iirgham Estates Area). 

LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

9. Petition of Kings Row, 
A Partnership, by Stanley A. 
Phillips, Attorney, for a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classificatioh from A-1 
Apartment District to 0-1 
OHIce District on certain 
pn^MTty beginning at a point 
146.60 feet North of. Virginia 



Beach Boulevard, running a 
distance of 276.60 feet along 
the East side rt LiHIe Meek 
Ro«l, running a distance of 
430 fatt akmg the Northern 
property line, running a 
distance of 382 feet along the 
Eastern property line and 
running a distance of 443 feet 
along the Southern prop«rty 
line. Said parcel contains 
3,247 acres. (Southern 
Terrace Bellehaven Area ) 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
10. Petition of Ruby 
Barco for a Change of Zoning 
District Classification from 
R-7 Residential Dishrict to H- 
2 Resort Hotel District on 
certain property located on 
the Southeast corner of High 
Point Avenue and Arctic 
Avenue, running a distance 
of 109.7 feet along the Sooth 
side of High Point Avenue, 
running a distance of 100.07 
feet along the East side of 
Arctic Avenue, running a 
distance of 196.71 feet along 
the Southern property line 
and running a distance of 100 
feet more or less along the 
Eastern property line (Lake 
Holly). Said parcel is known 
as Lots 2, 4, 6, 7, and 8, Block 
10, Map of Shore Acres and 
contains 0.29 acre more or 
less. (Shadowlawn Heights- 
Shore Acres Areas). 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

11, Petition Of Ruby C. 
Barco for a Change of Zoning 
District Classification from 
R.7 Residential District to H- 
2 Resort Hotel District on 
certain property beginning at 
a point 1050.07 feet East of 
Arctic Avenue, running a 
distance of 105.18 feet along 
the North side of Winston 
Salem Avenue, running a 
distance of 193.29 feet along 
the Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 10.15 
feet along the Northern 
property line and running a 
distance of 100 feet along the 
Western property line. Said 
parcel in known as Lots 1, 3, 
and 5, Block 11, Map of Shore 
Acres and contains 0.163 
acre. (Shadowlawn Heights- 
Shore Acres Areas). Vir- 
ginia beach borough. 

19. p^titionof Rodney Louis 
Mills for a Change of Zoning 
Disfricf Classification from 
R.7 Residential District to A- 
4 Apartment District on 
certain property beginning at 
a point 270 feet East of Baltic 
Avenue, running a distance 
of 90 feet along the South side 
of 9th Street, running a 
distance of 100 feet along the 
Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 90 feet 
along the Southern property 
line and running a distance of 
100 feet along the Western 
property line. Said parcel is 
known as Lots 12, 14, and 16, 
Block 16, Plat of Shadowlawn 
Heights and contains 9,000 
square feet. (Shadowlawn 
Heights Area). VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

13. Petition Of J. Walter 
Brothers for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
from R-7 Residential District 
to A-4 Apartment District on 
certain property beginning at 
a point 90 feet East of Baltic 
Avenue and running a 
distance of 240 feet along the 
Northern property line of 
which 180 feet is the South 
side of 9th Street, running a 
distance of 200 feet along the 
Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 240 feet 
along the North side of 
Maryland Avenue and 
running a distance of 200 feet 
along the Western property 
line. Said parcel is known as 
Lots 15, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 
23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, and 29, 
Block 16, Plat Of Shadowlawn 
Heights and contains 42,00 
square feet. (Shadowlawh 
Heights Area). VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

14. Petition of Julia, 
Harriet and Katrine de Witt 
for a Change of Zoning 
District Classification from 
B-4 Resort Commercial 
District to H-2 Resort Hotel 
District on certain property 
located on the East side of 
Pacific Avenue extending 
between 12th Street and 13th 
Street, running a distance of 
330 feet along the East side of 
Pacific Avenue, running a 
distance of 200 feet along the 
South side of I3th Street, 
running a distance of 330 feet 
along the Eastern property 
line, running a distance of 200 
feet along the Southern 
property line of which 100 
feet is the North side of 12th 
Street. Said parcel contains 
1.14 acres. VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

15. Petition of Virginia 
Gateway, Inc., for a Change 
of Zoning District 
Classification from A-1 
Apartment District to A-4 
Apartment District on 
certain property located at 
the Southeast corner of 18th 
Street and Parks Avenue, 
running a distance of 300 feet 
along the South side of 18th 
Street, runnlna a distance of 
ISOfeetalongthe East side of 
Parks Avenue, running a 
distance of 300 feet along the 
Southern property line and 
running a distance of 150 feet 
along the Eastern property 
line. Said parcel contains 1 
acre moreor less. VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

16. Petition of Trent 
Berkshire Development 
Co«p.,foraChangeof Zoning 
District Classification from 
R-1 Residential District to R- 
3 Residential District on 
certain property located at 
the Northwest corner of Five 
Points Road and Inlynnview 
Road, running a distance of 
1235 feet more or less along 
the North side of inlynnview 
Road, running a distance Of 
1220 feet more or less along 
the Eastern property line of 
which 610 feet is the West 
side of Five Points Road, 

- running a distance of 1260 
feet more or Iws along the 
Northern property line and 
running a distance of 1045 
feet along the Western 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 22 acres niore or 
less. (Southern Polnts- 




Tranhfwod Shores Arew). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
17. Petition of L-OJ 
Associates, . A Genaral 
Partnership, for a Change of 
Zoning District Classificatkm 
from A-1 Apartment District 
to B-2 Community Business 
District on certain property 
beginning at a point 800 feet 
more or less West of Hotton 
Lane, and 170 feet more or 
less North of Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, running a 
distance of 24S.I feet along 
the Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 212J 
feet along the Northern 
property line and running a 
distance of 314 feet atong the 
Western property line and 
running a distance of 200 feet 
along the Southern propvVf 
line. Said parcel contains 1.2 
acres more or less, (Eureka 
Park-London Bridge Arms). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
18. Petition of Century 
Developers for a Change of 
Zoning District Classificatton 
from R-5 Residential District 
to A-2 Apartment District on 
certain property located on 
the Southwest corner of Old 
Harris Lane and Pleasure 
House Road, running a 
distance of 400 feet along the 
South side of Old Harris 
Lane, running a distance of 
175.98 feet along the Eastern 
property line of which 82.30 
feet Is the West side of 
Pleasure House Road, 
running a distance of 417 feet 
more or less along the 
Southern property line, and 
running a distance of 158 feet 
along the Western property 
line. Said parcel contains 
1.457 acres. (Bradford 
Terrace Area). BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

19. Petitionof A.T.Taylor 
Estate for a Change of 
zoning District Classification 
from 1-2 Heavy Industrial 
District to AG- 1 Agricultural 
District on certain property 
beginning at a point 2065 feet 
more or less Northeast of 
London Bridge Road, run- 
ning a distance of 818 feet 
more or less along the West 
side of Harpers Road, run- 
ning a distance of 951 feet 
along the Northern property 
llne(U.S. Naval Air Station), 
running a distance of 1445 
feet more or less along the 
Eastern property line. Said 
parcel contains 11 acres 
more or less. (Oceana Naval 
Air Station Area). PRIN- 
CESS ANNE BOROUGH. 
Conditional Use Permits: 

20. Application of Paul N. 
Howard Co., for a Con- 
ditional Use Permit to 
operate a contractors' 
storage yard for a period of 
two years on certain 
property located on the South 
side of Bow Creek Boulevard 
behween Carriage Hill Road 
and South Lynnhaven Road, 
running a distance of 200 feet 
along the West side of South 
Lynnhaven Road, running a 
distance of 200 feet along the 
Southern property line and 
running a distance of 200 feet 
along the East side of 
Carriage Hill Road. Said 
parcel contains 0.92 acre. 
(Princess Anne Plaza-Magic 
Hollow Areas). PRINCESS 

ANNE BOROUGH. . „, 

21. Applicatton of HOT 
Associates for a Conditional 
Use Permit to construct two 
two-family detached 
dwellings (duplexes) on 
certain property located on 
the South side of 26th Street 
beginning at a point 70 feet 
Northeast of Cypress 
Avenue, running a distance 
of 120 feet- along the South 
side of 26th Street, running a 
distance of 140 feet along the 
Eastern property line and 
running a distance of 120 feet 
along the Southern property 
line and running a distance of 
140 feet along the Western 
property line. One duplex Is 
requested on Lots 26 and 28 
and One duple on Lots 22 and 
24, Block 128, AAap No. 6, Plat 
Of Virginia Beach 
Development Co. and con- 
tains a total of 0.38 acres. 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

22. Application of William 
D. Porter and Kathleen J. 
Hall for a Conditional Use 
Perm it to operate a bicycle 
rental in conjunction with the 
Sheraton Beach Inn on 
certain property located on 
the East side of Atlantic 
Avenue on the North side of 
36th Street at Oceanfront. 
Said parcel is known as a 
part of Lot 1, Block 85, and 
contains KH square feet. 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

23. Application at W.W. 
McClanan, Jr., for a Con- 
ditional Use Permit for a 
lodge for fraternal 
organization on certain 
property beginning at a point 
100 feet more or less along 
Prosperity Road East of 
General Booth Boulevard, 
and running in a Northerly 
direction a distance of 1075 
feet nfU>re or less, beginning 
on the East side of Prosperity 
Road, running a distance of 
280 feet along the Western 
property line of which 200 
feet is the East side of 
Prosperity Road, running a 
distance of 742 feet along the 
Northern property line, 
running a distance of 280 feet 

.^1? along the Eastern property 
line and running a distance of 
745 feet along the Southern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 4.1 acres. (KOA 
Campgrounds Area). 
PR INCCSS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 
Street Closure: 

24. ApplicatkmoftheClty 
of Virginia Beach, Depart- 
ment of ComnHinlty Ser- 
vices, for the discontinuance, 
closure and at>andonment of 
a1!)oft4on of Providence Road 
begliNiirtg at a point 220 feet 
more or less East of the in- 
tersection of Indian River 
Road and Providence Road 
known as Parcels 4, 5 and 6 
as shown on a plat entitled 
"Plat Showing Street Closure 
on Prm^idence Road and 
Property Dedication on 
Indian River Road" dated 2- 
22-74, Engineering Diviskm, 
Departmwit of Community 
Services, City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, excluding 
the 3S-foot permanent 
utilities easement as 
designated on the subject 
plat. More detailed in- 
formation is available in the 
Office of the Planning 
Department. (Barretts 
Corner Area). KEMP- 
SVILLE BOROUGH. 

Plats with more detailed 
informatkm on the above 
applicathins are avallaCAe In 
the Department of PiamifHi. 

All intarcst^ pansra we 
invited to atterKl. 

Charles C. CarrMiglon 
Director of Planning 

Mayl,8st 



V 






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N0TIC6 

Virginia; 

Tte regular meeting ot the 
Councit 01 Itie City of Virginia 
Beach wHI be held in the 
Council .Chaml)ers of the 
Administration Building, 
City Hall, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, on AAonday, May 13, 
1W4, at 2:00 P.M. at which 
time the following ap- 
plications will be heard: 
Change of Zoning District 
Classifications: 
PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH 

DEFERRED BY CITY 
COUNCIL SOR A PERIOD 
OF 90 DAYS ON 
FEBRUARY 12, 1W4: 

1. Petition Of Com 
monwealth Financial Corp., 
by Owen B. Pickett, Attor 
ney, for a Change of Zoning 
District Classification from 
R-8 Residential District to A- 
1 Apartment District on 
certain property beginning at 
a point 440 feet more or less 
South of South Birdneck 
Road, running a distance of 
1664 feet more or less along 
the West side of General 
Booth Boulevard, running a 
distance of 325 feet nKX'e or 
less along the Southern 
property line, running a 
distance of 1365.34 feet along 
the Western property line 
and running a distance of 
159.31 feet along the ftorthern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 8.5 acres more or 

less. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

2. Petition of Com 
monwealth Financial Corp., 
by Owen B. Pickett, Attor- 
ney, for a Change of Zoning 
District Classification from 
R-8 Residential District to A- 
1 Apartment District on 
certain property beginning at 
a point 470 feet more or less 
South of South Birdneck 
Road, running a distance of 
2100 feet along the Western 
property line of which 1642 
feet', is ' the East side of 
Gen,6ral Booth Boulevard, 
runhing a distance of 860.78 
feet along the Southern 
property line, running a 
distance of 2492.11 feet along 
the Eastern property line and 
running a distance of 1234.23 
feet along the Northern 
property line of which 200 
feet is ^he South side of South 
Birdneck Road. Said parcel 
contains 41.2 acres and ex- 
cludes a parcel containing 2.3 
acres proposed for B-1 
Commercial Residential 
Zoning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

3. Petition of Com- 
m6?»Wealth (financial Corp., 
by Owen B. Pickett, Attor- 
ney, for a Change of Zoning 
District Classification from 
R-8 Residential District to B- 
1 Commercial Residential 
District on certain property 
beginning at a point 1460 feet 
more or less South of South 
Birdneck Road and 115 feet 
more or less East of General 
Booth Boulevard, running a 
distance of ITS feet more or 
less along the Western 
property line, running a 
diste<hte oi'U* fWt rfVoYe or 
less alonS the Northern 
property line and running a . 
distance of 344 feet more or 
less along the Eastern 
projierty line and running a 
distance of 342 feet more or 
less along the Southern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 2.3 acres more or 
less. PRINCESS ANNE 

BOROUGH 

LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH 

4. Petition of Eleanor H. 
and Neill McRae, Jr., for a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from R-8 
Residential Distrlcf to 0-1 
Office District on certain 
property located on the 
Southwest corner of South 
Lynnhaven Road and Ansol 
Lane, running a distance of 
100 feet along the West side of 
South Lynnhaven Road, 
running a distance of 150 feet 
along the South side of Ansol 
Lane, running a distance of 
100 feet along the Western 
property line and running a 
distance of 150 feet along the 
Southern property line. Said 
parcel is known as Lots 1 and 
2, Block 7. Plat of Lynnhaven 
Village and contains 15,000 
square feet. (Lynnhaven 
Village Area). LYN- 
NHAVEN BOROUGH. 

5. Petition of Judy 
Andrassy by Peter K. 
Babalas, Attorney, for a 
Chmge of Z<ming District 
Classification from R-5 
Residential District to A-4 
Apartment District on 
certain property beginning at 
a point 723.7 feet East of 
Birdneck Road, running a 
distance of 541.75 feet along 
the Southern property line of 
which 218.52 feet is the North 
side of Chinquapin Trail, 
running a distance of 219.78 
feet along the Eastern 
property line (186.02 feet 
South of Laskin Road), 
running a distance rt 561.83 
feet along the Northern 
property line and running a 
distance of 309 feet along the 
Western property line. SaW 
parcel contains 2.822 acres. 
Planning Commission 
recommends B-2 Community 
Business District. (Birdneck 
Village Area). LYNN- 
HAVfeN BOROUGH. 

6. Petition of Clyde 
Atsalom and Bonnie Be-Lo 
Markets, Inc., by Grover C. 
Wrft^t, Jr., Attorney, for a 
Chmge of Zoning District 
Classification from R-8 
Residential District to «-2 
Community Business 
District on certain property 
beginning at thepoNit 150 feet 
South Of Shore Drive, run- 
ning a distance of 170.6 feet 
along the West side of Red 
Tide Road, running a 
distance of 300.W feet along 
the North side of Cape Herry 
Drive, running a distance of 
193.76 feet atong the East sWe 
of Sea Shell Road, and 
running a distance of 300 feet 
along the Northern property 
line. Said parcel is known as 
Lots 7 thnx^h 14, Stock M, 
Plat of Lynnliaven B^iA. 
(Lywihaven 0>tony Area). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

7. Petition of The 
Southland Employees Trust 
fw a Change of toning 
District Ctasslflcatton from 
a. 9 Residential Townhouse 
District to B 2 Community 
Busmen District on «w^«ln 
proptr^ «»•»**»*»«•♦• Pow 
SBO f«t nf»r» w less South of 
Slllna Drive, running a 
dlstwce of 217 fe«t more or 
less along the West shie « 
South Lynnhaven Rom, 
running a distance rt 4M.3S 
feet along the southarn 
orooertv line, running a 



distMice of 181.52 feet along 
ttie Western jxroperty line, 
and running a distance of 
341 M taet akxig the Northern 
propciiy line. Said parc^ 
contaim 1.96 acres more or 
less. (Princess Anne Plaza 
Area). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

8. Petition of Ella L. 
Jolmson for | Change of 
Zoning District classificatkHi 
from R-8 Residential District 
to 1-1 Light Industrial 
District on certain property 
beginning at a point 558 feet 
East of North Oceana 
Boulevard, running a 
distance of 279 feet along the 
North side of Southern 
Boulevard, running a 
distance of 780.7 feet along 
the Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 279 feet 
along the Northern pro|>erty 
lineand running a distanceof 
780.7 feet along the Western 
property line. Said parcel is 
known as Lot 45, Plat of 
Oceana Gardens and con- 
tains 5 acres. (Oceana 
Gardens Area). LYN- 
NHAVEN BOROUGH. 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH 

9. Petition of A.L. Wood 
by Grover C. Wright, Jr., 
Attorney, for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
from R 8 Residential District 
(formerly R-2) to A-4 
Apartment District (for- 
merly R-3) on certain 
property located at the 
Northwest corner of Baltic 
Avenue and 25th Street, 
running a distance of 140 feet 
along the West side of Baltic 
Avenue, running a distance 
of 100 feet along the North 
side of 25th Street, running a 
distance of 140 feet along the 
Western property line and 
running a distance of 100 feet 
along the Northern property 
line. Said parcel is known as 
Lots 1, 3, and 5, Block 127, 
Virginia Beach Dvelopment 
Company, May No. 6, and 
contains 14,000 square feet. 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

PUNGO BOROUGH 

10. Petition of Seneca 
CampsitPS, Inc., for a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from AG-1 
Agricultural District to A-1 
Apartment District on 
certain property located on 
the West side of Princess 
Anne Road beginning at a 
point 4600 feet more or less 
South of Public Landing 
Road, running a distance of 
772 feet along the Eastern 
property line of which 320 
feet is the West side of 
Princess Anne Road, running 
a distance of 1524.54 feet 
along the Southern property 
line, running a distance of 
1302 feet along the Northern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 26.16 acres. 
(Munden Area). PUNGO 
BOROUGH. ' 
Conditional Use Permit 

11. Application of Seneca 
Campsites, Inc., for a Con- 
ditional Use Permit to 
operate a mobile home park 
certain property located on 
the West side of Princess 
Anpe Road beginning at a 
point 4600 feet more or less 
South of Public Landing 
Road, running a distance of 
772 feet along the Eastern 
property line of which 320 
feet is the West side of 
Princess Anne Road, running 
a distance of 1524.54 feet 
along the Southern property 
line, running a distance of 
1149 feet along the Western 
property line and running a 
distanceof 1302 feet along the 
Northern property line. Said 
parcel contains 26.16 acres. 
(Munden Area). PUNGO 
BOROUGH. 

Richard J. Webbon 
City Clerk 
\ /Way1,B,2T 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE FOR 
THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR 
THE CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH ON THE 29TH DAY 
OF APRIL 1974. 

CITY OF VIRGINIA 
b6ACH, VIRGINIA, 
a Municipal Corporation, 
Complainant, 
vs. 

ELEANOR M. FRY, 
Roanoke, Virginia, 
And the consort of this 
defendant whose name is 
also unknowwi, and if the 
defendant be dead, t»er 
surviving consort. If any 
there be, the defendant's 
children, if any there be, her 
heirs at law, next of kin, 
devisees, legatees, personal 
representatives, Men 
creditors and lien creditors 
of any heirs or devisees, and 
any other person or cor- 
porations, having any in- 
terest in the subject matter 
of this suit; all of whose post 
office addressed are com- 
pletely unknown; and that all 
of said parties are hereby 
made parties defendant to 
this proceeding by the 
general description of 
"PARTIES UNKNOWN", 
Defendants. 

IN CHANCERY DOCKET 
NO. C74-555C 

The object of this suit is for 
the said Complainant to 
enforce its lien for taxes and 
to sell for the paym ent _of 
cerllilnUellnqoent taxafc*B 
following-described real 
estate in the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, to-wit; 

ALL THOSE certain pieces 
or parcels of land situated in 
the City of Virginia Beach 
(formerly Princess Anne 
County), State of Vinilnia 
and designated as Lots Nos. 
15 and 16 in Block A on the 
Plat of Pri^jerty of the 
Rosemont Corporation of 
City of Norfolk, Virginia, 
which said Plat is duly 
recorded in the OHIce of the 
Clerk of the Circuit Court of 
the City rt Virginia Beach In 
AAap Book 2, at Pa<» 51. The 
said tela fronting hwenty-flve 
(25) feet ea* on the Eastern 
si«te of CheitTOJf Street, and 
running back between 
parallel lines one hwidred 
forty (140) feet, mwe or less. 
Is the center of saW Wock. 
IT BEiNG a part of the 
same fwtjperty of which a 
wiel^lt (»^) undlvWwl hi- 
t«^t In said tots was «"■ 
>«^ by C. C. Tall^HTO and 
wife to the Drtencrtnt h«^n 
in Deed W»k W, at ^ft W 
and by Deed « PsTfltlOB 
dated July i, 1W*. «*•* «^ 
duly rrnxm^a fn Deed Book 
119 at Page 485 In t1» a«*'s 
Office of the Virginia Bea«^ 
Circuit Court frwn Tuley J. 
Mifchel conveying h* un- 
divided aneJMH (V%) Mitwmt 
m LM U and Mk M«^ A. 
Raaenwid, t» Wm iWndwtt 



herein. 

SAID PROPERTY is 
Shown on the City Assessor's 
Map as No. F-S 3 (2). 

And an Affidavit having 
been made and filed that tl«e 
Defendant Is unknown as to 
wrtMrealiouls, acMren and 
location, aitlHMigti due 
diligence has been used by 
and on tehalf of the Cont- 
plalnant, its Agents, 
Employees, and Attorneys, 
to ascertain the County of 
Corporatton in which the said 
Defendant is resWing, but 
without effect, ttw last known 
post office adch-ess of the said 
Defendant being ELEANOR 
M. FRY, RMhoke, Virginia; 
It Is 

ORDERED that she does 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interests In this suit '" 
A COPY— TESTE: 

,/■ 
Larry Wise p.q. 
By Sandra Hargrove 
Deputy Clerk 
P.O. Box 15142 
Chesapeake; Virginia 23320 
Teleplwfie: 
547-4095 
547-3264 

S-1. S2t 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

In the Clerk's OHice of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on the 23rd 
day of April, 1974. 
Robert L. Dowdy 
Plaintiff 
against 

Audrey Gehrmann Dowdy, 
DeferKlant. 

The object of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of two vear seoaratlon. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that due 
diligence has been used by or 
on behalf of the Complainant 
to ascertain in which county 
of corporation the defendant 
resides, without effect, the 
last known post office ad- 
dress being: 2967 Talon 
Court, Va. Beach, VA 23456 it 
is ordered that she do appear 
here within ten (10) days 
after due publicatton hereof, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect f»r 
interest in this suit. 
A copy-Test: 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 
CLERK 

BY Sandra Hargrove D, 
Clerk, 

Barrow 8i Lowe 
3104 Arctic Ave. 
Virginia Beach, VA 

5-1, 8, 15, 22, 4T 



ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA 

In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
-Virginia Beach on the 2a'd 
day of April, 1974. 
Barbara J. McClure, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

AAarvIn L. McClure, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A AAensa Et 
Thoro to be later merged into 
a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrlmonnl at the proper 
time from the said defen- 
dant, upon the grounds of 
desertion on January 11, 
1974. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post oHlce address 
U.S.S. Coral- Sea CVS 21, 
F.P.O. San Francisco, 
California it Is ordered that 
he do appear here within ten 
(10) days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary .to 
protect his Interest in this 
suit. 

A copy -Test: 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 
CLERK 

BY: Sandra Hargrove D. 
Clerk 

Decker, Zoby, Colliai 8i 
Christie 
900 Plaza One 
Norfolk, VA 

5-1,8, 15, 22 4T 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 

CLERK'S OFFICE FOR 

THE CIRCUIT COURT OF 

THE CITY OF VIRGINIA 

BEACH ON THE 29th DAY 

OF APRIL 1974. 

CITY OF - VIRGINIA 

BEACH, VIRGINIA, 

a Municipal Corporation, 

Complainant, 

vs. 

JOHN R. RIDDICK, 

address completely unknown 

and unavailable, 

and the consort of this 

Defendant, whose name is 

also unknown, and if the 

defendant be dead, his 

surviving consort, if any 

•fNre be, the defendant's 

children. If any there be, his 

heirs at taw, next of kiW-' 

devisees, legatees, personal 

representatives, lien 

creditors wd lien creditors 

of any heirs or ttevlsees, and 

any ottier person or a>r- 

porations having any Interest 

in the subject matter of this 

suit, all of whose post office 

addresses are completely 

unknown; and that all of said 

parties are hereby made 

parties defendant to this 

>.*»oceedlng by the general 

"description of <«PARTIES 

UNKNOWN", Defendants. 

IN CHANCERY 

DOCKET NO. 

C74-SSSB 

The object of this suit Is for 
the said Complainant to 
enforce its lien for taxes and 
to sell for the payment of 
certain delinquent taxes tt»e 
followlng-dascribed real 
estate in tt» City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, to-wit: 

ALL THOSE certain thirty- 
five (35) tots situate In the 
City of Virginia Beach 
(formerly County of Princess 
Anne), Virginia, mni num- 
bered and (teslgnatad as Lots 
4, 6, 7. 8, 9, 21, 2S, M, tl, 8, 29, 
30, 31 , 32, 33, 34, », 43, Lots 46 
through 61 (Inchisive), «»d 
Lot K, Vto0k 14<m the Plat of 
"Oakwood" made 
by Cotonwm & FItdiett; Civil 
Enghwers, in Mar<*« 1914; 
saw toft 4, «, 7, a, 9, 21, 1&, % 
V, », », », it, M, », 34 and 
S fronting on Ruby Avanua, 
Mid lots 43 46 through 41 
(inclMSlver and Lot iS 
fronrmgoB Pe art Awroww 
^wwn on tt»e atoi eineiilloftad 
Plat duly re^rded fc» tfw 
Clerk's OHlce of the said City 
of VirghiM B a aeh m Mi^ 
Book 5, at M«a V. SAID 
PROPERTY te lite »hww en 



ttw City Assessor's iMap as B- 
4-1(2) (plus specific Lot 
Nun^ier ). 

And an AHMavit having 
been made and filed that Hw 
Defendant to unknown as to 
«Mwr«Mouts, addr^ and 
location, although dua 
dlligance has baan usad by 
and on behalf of the Cdnt- 
plainant, Its Agaitts, 
Emptoyees, and Attorneys, 
to ascertain the County of 
Corporatten in which the said 
Defendant Is now resMhig, 
but without effect, the last 
totown post office addnm of 
the said Defendant being 
completely unknown and 
unavailable,- It Is 

ORDERED that She does 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due pubUcatkm 
hweof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest m this suit. 
A COPYTESTE: 
Larry Wise, p.q. 
By Sandra Hargrove Deputy 
Clerk 

P.O. Box 15142 
Chesapeake, Virginia 23330 
Telephone: 
547-4095 
547-3264. 

*-1,i-JT 



ORPRROF 
PUBLICATION 

VIRGINIA.: IN THE 

CLERK'S OFFICE OF THE 

CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 

CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH 

ON THE 29th DAY OF 

APRIL, 1974. 

CITY OP VIRGINIA 

BEACH, VIRGINIA 

a Municipal Corporation, 

Complainant, 

vs. 

HERBERT LAND and LISA 

LAND, also known as LIZA 

LAND, Husband and Wife, 

Princess Anne County, 

Virginia, 

and the consorts of these 
defendants, whose names are 
also unknown, and If the 
defendants be dead, ttiair 
surviving consorts if any 
there be, the defendants' 
children, if any there be, 
their heirs at law, next of kin, 
devisees, legatees, personal 
representatives. Hen 
creditors and lien creditors 
of any heirs devisees, and 
any other person or cor- 
porations having any Interest 
in the subject matter of this 
suit, all of whose post office 
addresses are completely 
unknown; and that all of said 
parties are hereby made 
parties defendant to tt»is 
proceeding by the general 
description of "PARTIES 
UNKNOWN", Defendants. 
IN CHANCERY 
DOCKET NO. 
C74-5SSA 
The object of this suit is for 
the said Complainant to 
enforce Its lien for taxes and 
to sell for the payment of 
certain delinquent taxes the 
following-described real 
estate in the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, to-wIt: 

ALL THAT certain lot, 
piece or parcel of land, lying 
and being in Kempsvllle 
Borough of the City of 
Virginia Beach (formerly 
Kempsvllle Magisterial 
District of Princess Anne 
County), State of Virglniflk 
described as follows! 
BEGlNNINGatapolntintfte 
Western line of Rufus Parks, 
marked by a pipe, the 
Northeast corner of the land 
hereby conveyed and the 
land this day conveyed by 
said Grantors to Pronws 
Williams and Beatrice 
Williams; and running 
thence South along the West 
line of said Rufus Parks, 213 
feet and 8 inches to the 
Northern line of James 
Cornick, marked by a pipe; 
thence West 145 feet 10 inches 
to a point marked by an oak 
tree; the Southwest corner of 
the property hereby con- 
veyed and the said James 
Cornick and Thomas Mason, 
thence North along the 
Eastern line of Thomas 
AAason 234 feet 4 Inches to a 
point marked by an iron post, 
the corner of the said 
Williams and Wife and said 
Thomas AAason; thence East 
along the Southern line of the 
land conveyed to said 
Williams and Wife 152 feet to 
a point in the Western line of 
the said Rufus Parks marked 
by a pipe, the point of 
beginning. 

IT BEING EXACTLY the 
same property conveyed to 
the Defendant herein by 
Deed from C.C. Frlziell and 
his wife, on January 10, 1949, 
which said deed Is duly 
recorded In the Office of the 
Clerk of the Circuit Court of 
Virginia Beach In-Deed Book 
261, at Page 339. SAID 
PROPERTY Is shown on the 
City Assessor's AAap as E5-2- 
(2)-18. 

And an AHWavlt having 
bean made and filed ttiat the 
Defendants are unknown as 
to whereabouts, address and 
location, alttiough due 
diligence has been used by 
and on behalf of the C«n- 
plalnant. Its Agents, 
Emptoyees and Attorneys, to 
ascertain the County of 
CorporatiM) in^(*hiGh the laW 
Defendants are resMing, but 
without effect, the last known 
post crffi<» adcft-eMes of ttw 
said Defendants being 
Princess Anne County. 
Virginia; It is 

ORDERED that they do 
a^war here withto ten (10) 
days after Aie publication 
hereof, «id do what may be 
necessary to protect tttelr 
Interests ih this suit. 
A COPYTESTE: 
Larry Wise p.q. 
By Sawfra Hargrove Deputy 
Clerk 

P.O. Box 15142 

Chesapeake, Virginia 233» 

TelcphofW: 

S47-409S 

547-3M4. 

5-1.8— IT 



ORDER 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH, ON THE 
2»th DAY OF APRIL, 1974. 
In re: Moptton of OavM 
Wayne Manter an Mairt 
oncter the age rt fow^an 
years to be nanwd Davto 
Wayne Tripp 

By: ^Mn EsttM- Simons 
Tripp and Robert Lloyd 
Tripp PefHionars 
To: William ftorman Mantar 
WrtWwm, ManadMSifts 

Thto day ortia Joan Es«w 
SinwB Tripp Mid RoMrl 
Ltoyd Tripp, P^lttonart, and 
re p r w w >» rtWiat Wiaob N?t^ 
tills piuctadlng W te affact 
tlie adoption of tl»e wjove 
named MMnt (s), DavW 
Wayne Mantar, by Joan 
EsflMT tkmm Tim and 



and wife, and affidavit 
having been made and filed 
that Joan Esther Slnwns 
Tripp, a nahiral parent of 
said Chlld(ren), is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Vlrgkiia, the tost kQpwn post 
office address being : 
waltham, AAassachusatfs. 
It Is therefore Ord«^ Ittat 
the said William Norman 
AAanter appsar before this 
Court within fen (10) days 
after publication of this 
Order and indicate his-her 
attltode toward the proposed 
adoptton, or oltiarwisa do 
what is necessary to protect 
his Interest In this matter. 
A copy teste: 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit D.C. 
Penekipc D. CoHman 
4999 Cievelancl Sh-eet 
Va. Beach, va. 

^^^ORDBRO^^^^ 
PUtLICATION 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA. 

in the Clerk's OHlce of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 29th 
day of April, 1974. 
Mary Hughes Webb, 
PlalntlH, 
against 

Don Hughey Webb, Oafen- 
dant. 

The object of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
AAatrimonll from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of desertton continuous for 
two years without in- 
terruption. 

And an affMavIt having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: c-o Modlne Rollins, 
Rutherfordton, Nortti 
Carolina. 

It Is ordered that he do 
appear t«ere within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do wtiat may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest In this suit. 
A copy -Teste: John V. 
Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk 

Kelsey S, Kelsey 
1408 AAaritime Tower 
Nortolk, Virginia 

»-1,8,IS,»»— «T 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF 
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH, ON THE 11th DAY 
OF April, 1974. 

In Chancery 

No. C-74-280 
In re: Adoption of John 
Douglas LIpps 
By: Michael D. Miller and 
Margaret K. Miller, 
Petlttoners 
To: John D. LIpps 
120 Sterling Street 
Norfolk, Virginia 

ORDER 

This day came Michael 
D. Miller and Margaret K. 
Miller, Petitioners, and 
represented that the object 
of this proceeding is to 
effect the adoption of the 
above named Infant, John 
Douglas LIpps, by Michael 
D. Miller and Margaret K. 
Miller, husband and wife, 
and affadvalt having been 
made and filed that John D. 
LIpps, a natural parent of 
said child. Is a non-resident 
of the State of Virginia, to 
ascertain his whereabouts, 
to no effect: the last known 
post office address being: 
120 Sterling Street, Nortolk 
Virginia. 

-It Is therefore Ordered 
that the said John D. Lipps 
appear before this Court 
within ten (10) days after 
publication of this Order 
and Indicate his attitude 
toward tlie proposed 
adoption, or otherwise do 
what is necessary to protect 
his interest In this matter. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit D.C. 

Peter G. Decker, Jr. 
900 Plaza One 
Nortolk, Virginia 

4-24,5-1,8,15-4t 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
in the Clerk's Office of 
the CIrciut Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
17th day of April, 1974. 
Marjorle Jane Hollmann 
Fletcher,, Plaintiff, 
against 

Tully Mack Fletcher, Jr., 
Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Theobjectof thissuit Isto 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
of separation uninterrupted 
for more than tMO years. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant Is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
418 North Driver Court, 
Durham, North Carolina. 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

s 
John V. Fentress, Clark 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk 

Smith, Pww. •« Owens 
412 Maritime Tower 
Norfolk, Virginia 

424,5 1.8.15 4t 



VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH ON 
THE 17th DAY OF APRIL, 
1974 

IN THE MATTER OF 
ESTATE OF VICTOR B. 
TATE. DECEASED 
CP NO. 1965 

SHOW CAUSE ORDER 

It appearing that a report 
of the accounts of United 
Virginia Bank Seaboard 
National, Administrator 
d.b.n.c.t.a. of the Estate of 
Victw' B. Tate, decoMOd, 
and of the debts and 
demands against his estato 
has been filed in the Clerk's 
Office of the aforesaid 
Court, and that six months 
have elapsed since the 
Wiallflcatton; on motion of 
said Administrator, 

IT ISORDERED that the 
creditors, andrsall others 
Mitwasted In saH estato, do 
Maw^aMa, II any may can, 
on Mie iTfh day of AAay, 1974, 
at 9.30 a.m. o'clock before 
the Judge of this Court In 
his Citombers In the Courts 
BuiWtag, PrtoceM Anne, 



Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
against the payment and 
delivery of the Estate M 
Victor B. Tate, deceased, to 
the legatees wtltled thereto 
without requiring refunding 
bonds. 

IT IS FURTHER 
ORDERED that the 
foregoing portion of tnls 
order be published once a 
weak for two successive 
weeks in the VIRGINIA 
BEACH SUN, a newspaper 
published and having 
general circulation in the 
City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By J. Curtis Fruit 

Thomas F. McPhaul 
Hofhelmer, Nusbaum k 
McPhaul, p.q. 
1010 Plaza One 
Nortolk, Virginia 23510 

4-24,51,2t 

VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH ON 
THE 17th DAY OF APRIL, 
1974 

IN THE MATTER OF 
ESTATE yOF MARION R. 
TATE, CjBGfeASED 
CP NO. 1964 

SHOW CAUSE ORDER 

It appearing that a report 
of the accounts of Unltod 
Virginia Bank-Seaboard 
National, Administrator 
c.t.a. ot me csiaTe ot 
Marlon R. Tate, deceased, 
and of the debts and 
demands against her estate 
has been filed In the Clerk's 
Office of the aforesaid 
Court, and that six months 
have elapsed since the 
qualification; on, motion of 
said Administrator. 

IT IS ORDER ED that the 
creditors, and all others 
interested In said estate; do 
show cvuse, If any they can, 
on the 17lb day of May , 1974, 
at 9:30 a.m. o'clock before 
the Judge of this Court in 
his Chambers in the Courts 
Building, Princess Anne, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
against the payment and 
delivery of the' Estate of 
Marion R. Tate, deceases, 
to the legatees entitled 
thereto without requiring 
refunding bonds. 

IT IS FURTHER 
ORDERED that the 
foregoing portion of this 
order be published once a 
week for two successive 
weeks in the VIRGINIA 
BEACH SUN, a newspaper 
published and having 
general circulation in the 
City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By J. Curtis Fruit D.C. 

Thomas F. McPhaul 
Hofhelmer, Nusbaum & 
McPhaul, p.q. 
1010 Plaza One 
Nortolk, Virginia 23510 

424,51,2-t 

Commonwealth of. Virginia, 
in the Clerk's Oil Ice of the 
Circuit Court of the City ot 
Virginia Beach, on the 22nd 
day ol April, 1974. 
Wanda Faye Blessing Lynch, 
PlalntlH, 
against 

Paul Lynch, Defendant, 
ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 



The object of this suit Is to 
obtain an absolute divorce 
from the said defendant upon 
the grounds of two year 
separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that due 
diligence has been used by or 
in behalf of the complainant 
to ascertain in which county 
or corporation the defendant 
is, without effect, the last 
known post office address 
being: 3306 Bailehtlne 
Boulevard, Norfolk, 
Virginia, 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days alter due publication 
hereol, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 
A copy Teste: John V, 
Fentress, Clerk 
By J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 

Tidewater Legal Aid Society 
700 Duke Street 
Norfolk, Virginia 

4-24 — 5-1, 8,15- 4T 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
9th day of April, 1974, 
Jacqueline A. Greene. 

Plaintiff; against 
Charles R. Greene, III, 
Defendant 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Theobjectof thissuit is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendaht, upon the 
grounds of willful desertion 
and abandonment. 

And an affidavit having 
been made IMd filed that 
me defendant Is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
506 North Pine Street, 
SMford. Delaware. 

It Is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
Intaresf in this suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS; 

CLERK 

BY: Sandra Hargrove D. 

Clerk 

Wlllcox, Savage, Lawrence, 

als 

Virginia National Bank 

BIdg. 

Norfolk, VA 

4.17,24,5-1,5-8-41 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
9fh day of April, 1974. 
Theodore R. Sfohr, 
Plaintiff, 
agsfRst 

Linda Ann Sfohr, 
Detondant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Theobject of this suit Is to 
obtain a dh^ce a mensa et 
thoro from the said 
defendant to b^ later 
merged Into a divorce a 
vinculo maff'Imonll from 
the said defendant upon the 
grounds Of desertions 

And an affidavit having 
baw mwM and filed that 
due dillgMKa has been used 



The Siin 
by or In behalf of the 
complainanf to ascertain In 
which county or 

corporation the defendant ' 
is without effect, the last 
known pott office address 
being: 3033 Ashlawn 
Terrace, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 

11 is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest In this suit. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: Sandra Hargrove, 
Deputy Clerk 

Clark. Stolnhllber & 
Hofhelmer 

287 Pembroke Office Park 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
4-17,24.5 I.ML 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
15th day of April, 1974, 
Ronald Winifred Martin, 
Plaintiff, 
against 
Anna K. Martin, Defendant. 

ORDBROF 
PUBLICATION 

Theobjectofthlssult Is to 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
thoro to be later merged 
Into a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
ol desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant Is a non 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: c 
Charles Anderson Route 
1, Belvldere. Tennessee 
37306. 

It Is ordered tl«st the do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days, after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
Interest In this suit, 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By; J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk 

Otie H. Gay, Jr. 
2871 River Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
4.i7,24,51,8-4t 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 
CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH ON THE IJth DAY 
OF APRIL, 1974. 
ELIZABETH T. 
OVERCASH 

Sole Surviving Executrix of 
the Estate of Robert Easton 
Townsend, deceased. 
Complainant, 

MARY L. CHILDRESS 
Address Unknown 
and the heirs of law, next of 
kin , devisees, legatees, 
creditors and Hen creditors 
of any heirs or devisees of 
Mary L. Childress, all of 
whose names are unknown 
and whose pott office 
addresses are unknown, all 
of whom are made parties 
to the proceeding of the 
general description of 
Parties Unknown, 
Respondents, 

inchancerV 

,N0-C.74.474 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Theobjectofthlssult Is to 
quiet title to property which 
Is more particularly 
described as followi; ttiat 
certain lot, piece or parcel 
of land situated In the City 
of Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
known and numbered as 
Lot 2, Block 40 at shown on 
that certain plat of Euclid 
Place which Is duly of 
record in the Clerk 't Office 
of the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, In Map Book 4 at 
pages 62 and 63. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that on 
Information and belief 
Mary L. Childress is not 
living. 

And an affidavit having 
been filed stating that there 
are or may be other persons 
interested in the subject 
matter to be disposed of In 
this suit whose names are 
unknown and whose last 
post office addresses are 
unknown, to-wit: The heirs 
at law, next of kin, 
devisees, legatees, 
creditors and lien creditors 
of any heirs or devisees of 
Mary L. Childress, all of 
whose names are unknown 
and whose post office 
addresses are unknown, all 
of whom are made parties 
to the proceeding by the 
general description of 
Parties Unknown; It It 
ORDERED that the above 
named pertont appear 
within ten (10) dayt after 
due publication of thit 
Order and do what It 
necessary to protect tttelr 
Interests; and it Is 

FURTHER ORDERED 
that the foregoing portion of 
this Order be published 
once a week for four (4J 
successive weeks In The 
Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper printed In the 
City of Virginia Beach, and 
having circulation in the 
City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, 

John V. Fentress, Clark 
By Sandra Hargrove 

Peter A. Agelasto, ill 
13W9ctt<*ited Virginia Bank 
Bldg; 
Noftolk.^A 

417,24,5-1,84t 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, an the 
12th day of April, 1974. 
Glenn Dwight 
Blankenbaker, Plaintiff, 
against 

Jewell Haddock 
Blankenbaker, Defendant. 

ORDBROF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
of desertion on February 23, 
1973. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant Is rwf a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, tt»e last known 
post office address being: 
2313 Yancy Street, Ralaigh, 
Nwth Carolina. 

It Is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
here^, and do what may be 
nec^iary to aretect her 
totwatt to this iult. 



■Wedaesday, May 1. 1974-Plwe B-7 

JOHN V FENTRESS: 

CLERK 

BY: Sandra Hargrove D. 

Clerk 

Decker, Zoby, Colllat. al 
900 Plaza One 
Nortolk, VA 

4 17,24,5 1,8 4t 

ORDBROF 
PUBLICATION 

COMMONWEALTH 
OFVIROINIA 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF 
THE JUVENILE AND 
DOMESTIC RELATIONS 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH. ON 
THE 8th DAY OF April. 
1974. 
In re Baby Girl Hogan 

The object of this 
proceeding Is to separate 
the atx>ve named Infant, 
child of Ramone Castro 
Jimenez IV and Mary Jean 
Hogan, permanently from 
1st parents and to commit 
said Infant to the care and 
custody of the Virginia 
Beach Department of 
Social Services with, the 
right of said agency to 
consent to the infant's 
adoption. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
Ramone Castro Jimenez IV ~ 
Is a proper party to this 
proceeding; but due 
diligence has been used to 
ascertain In what county or 
corporation he Is, without 
effect, it is ORDERED that 
Ramone Castro Jimenez IV 
do appear here within ton 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
Interest In this suit. 
A COPY TESTE: Gerald F, 
Williams, Clerk, 

Nancy Farley, 

Department of » Social 

Services 

(Petitioner) 

Elizabeth E. Henley Clerk 

4 17, 24, 5-1,8, 4f 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth ol Virginia, 
m the Clerk's Office ol the 
Circuit Court of the Clly ot 
Virginia Beach, on the 5th 
clay of April, 1974. 
Joseph Kent Hough, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Conda Lynn Hough, 
Defendant. 

The object ol this suH Is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
(if rteserllon as of December 
15, 1972 and lasting for a 
period ol more than one year. 
And an altldavli having been 
made and filed thai due 
diligence has been used by or 
<n behall of the complainant 
to ascertain in which county 
or corporation the defendant 
Is, withoui effect, the last 
known post office address 
being: Apl. 203, 1351 Pine 
Cone Circle, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. It It ordered that 
the do appear here within 
ten (10) dayt after due 
publication hereof, and do 
whay may be necessary to 
proteet her IntarMt In this 
tult. 

A copy— Tetite; John V. 
Fentress, Clerk 
By: Sandra Hargrove, 
Deputy Clerk. 
Boyce & Spanoulls 
105 N. Plara Trail 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

4-10,iy,M,I;14T 

ORDBROF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth ot Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the Clly of 
Virginia Beach, on the 5lh 
day of April, 1974. 
Doris June Lovegrove, ska. 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Jackson Earl Pugh, 
Deiendant. 

Theobject ol this sun Is to 
obtain an annulment from 
the said defendant, ujaon the 
grounds of defendant was not 
Iree to marry^ And an at- 
tidavll having been made 
and filed thai due diligence 
has been used by or on behalf 
of the Complainant to 
ascertain in what county or 
corporation the defendani is, 
without effect, the last known 
post office address being; c o 
Woodrow Pugh, 3200 
Tidewater Drive, Norfolk, 
Va. It Is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
flays alter due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest m this suit. 
A copy-Tesle: JOHN V. 
FENTRESS: CLERK 
BY; Sandra Hargrove D. 
Clerk, 

Smilh, Power 8, Owens 
1412 AAaritime Tower 
Norfolk, VA p.q. 

Apr. tO,17,24-May 1, 4t 

ORDER 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 

CLERK'S OFFICE OF 

THE CIRCUIT COURT OF 

THE CITY OF VIRGINIA 

BEACH, ON THE 4th DAY 

OF APRIL, 1974. 

In re; 

CHANGE OF NAME OF 

LANCE WAYNE 

SCHLAMEUS 

By: ROSEMARY 

CARLISLE 

Petitioners 

To: Mr. Kermit R. 

Schlameus 

CO Albert Einstein Medical 

Center (Soolhslde) 

Old York & Taylor Roads 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

In Chancery No. C-73,1463 

This day came 

ROSEMARY CARLISLE, 
Petlttoner, and represented 
that the object of this 
proceeding is to effect the 
Change of Name of the 
above named infant, 
LANCE WAYNE 
SCHLAMEUS, by 
ROSEMARY CARLISLE, 
and aHWavlt having been 
made and filed that 
KERMIT R. SCHLAMEUS, 
a natural parent of said 
child, is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia, the 
last known post office 
address being: co Al^rt 
Einstein Medical Center 
(Southslde) Old York 8, 
Taylor Roads, Phila 
(teli^ia, Penmylvwtia. 

It is therefore Ordered 
that me said KERMIT R 
SCHLAMEUS appear 
before this Court within ten 
(10) days antr publication 
of this Order and indicate 
his attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessara to protoct his 
Interest )h this maffer ' 



m 



Clossifiecl 



Page B-8-The Sun-Wednesday, May 1, 1974 



486-S4SO 



m 



UGALS 



A copy tesfe: 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fr^jit DC. 
WILLIAM H. COLONA, JRr 

p.q. 

281 Independence Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 2346? 
Apr. 10,17,24— May 1,4i 

ORDER 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 

CLERK'S OFFICE OF 

THE CIRCUIT COURT 0.F 

THE CITY OF VIRGINIA 

BEACH, ON THE 4th DAY 

OF APRIL, 1974. 

In re: Adoption of Emma 

Diane Bridges & Teresa 

Ann Bridges 

By Clarence Raymond 

Kinney & Carolyn Millner 

Kinney 

Petitioners 

In Chancery No. C74 431 

To: Donald 0. Bridges 

Route No. 1, Box 540 . 

Summerville, South 

CfcoHna 

'This day came Clarence 
Raymond Kenney and 
Carolyn Millner Kinney, 
Petitioners, and 
represented that the object 
of this proceeding is to 
effect the adoption of the 
above named infant (s), 
Emma Diane Bridges & 
Teresa Ann Bridges, by 
Clarence Raymond Kinney 
and Carolyn Millner 
Kinney, husband and wife, 
and affidavit having been 
rnade and filed that Donald 
6. Bridges, a natural 
parent of said child (ren),is 
a non resident of the State 
of Virginia, the last known 
post office address being 
Route No. 1, Box 540, 
Summerville, South 
Carolina. 

It is therefore Ordered 
that the said Donald 0. 
Bridges appear before this 
Court within ten (10) days 
after publication of this 
Order and indicate his-her 
attitude toward the 
■proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this matter. 
A copy teste: 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: Sandra Hargrove D.C. 
Robert L. Bohannon p.q. 
402 Plaza One 

t Norfolk, VA 23510 

I 4 10,17,24,5 1,4 1 



Stormont, wtio are not 
listed in the List of Heirs for 
D Stormont In Will Boek 7 
at page 83 of the Cterk's 
Office of the Circuit Cogrt 
of the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia (if any 
there be); 

It is^ORDERED that the 
defendants Franklin Lee 
Pennington and Henrietta 
Garrett Pennington who 
are not residents of the 
State of Virginia and the 
persons made defendants 
by the general description 
of "Parties Unknown" do 
appear here within ten day; 
after due publication of this 
Order and do what is 
necessary to protect their 
interest. 

It is further ORDERED 
that theforegoing portion of 
this Order be published 
once a week for four 
successive weeks in the 
Virginia Beach Sun. 

Jolin V. Fentress, Clerk 
By Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In ihe Clerk's Ottice o( thf 
Circuit Court of the City of 
' Virginia Beach, on the 2nd 
day of April, 1974. 
Lawrence Val DeSpain, 
Plaintiff, 

.against 
Linda Kaye DeSpain, 
Defendant. 

OROEROF 
PUBLICATtON 
Theobjectof thissuit is to 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
thoro, to be later merged 
into a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 

■ defendant: upon the 
, grounds of willful desertion. 
' And an affidavit having 
, been made and filed thai 
' dUe ditigence has been used 

by or in behalf of the 

conr»p1ainant to ascertain in 

' which county or 

■ cor()or'atirfh the defendant 
' is without effect, the last 

known post office address 
being: 5745 University 
Place, Apt. 102, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, it is 
ordered that he do apear 
here within ten (10) days 
after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect .his 
interest in this suit. 
A copy— Teste: John V. 
Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk. 

Branch H. Daniels 
281 Independence 
Boulevard 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 
Apr. 10,17,24— May 1,4t 

VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH ON 
THE 3rd DAY OF APRIL, 
1974. 

In Chancery 
No. C 74 412 
TERRAPIN HILL 

INVESTMENT 
CORPORATION, a Virginia 
corporation. Complainant 
vs 

FRANKLIN LEE 

PENNINGTON 
and 

HENRIETTA GARRETT 
PENNINGTON 
and 
1 The surviving spouse and 
or spouses of the defendants 
Franklin Lee Pennington 
and Henrietta Garrett 
Pennington, if they are 

* deceased, and the heirs, 
. devisees and successors in 

* title of said defendants and 
! all of the heirs, devisees 
J and successors in title of D. 

* Stormont, if any there be, 
' who have not conveyed 
, their interest in the 

property mentioned in this 
suit, all of whom are made 
parties defendant by the 
general description of 
"Parties Unknown" 
Defendants 






ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Theobjectof thissuit is to 
quiet title to real property 
located in the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
which the complainant has 
purchased from the heirs of 
D. Stormont. 

And an Affidavit having 
been made that the 
defendants. Franklin Lee 
Pennington and Henrietta 
Garrett Pennington (if 
living) are not residents of 
'the State of Virginia and 
their last known address is 
Franklin lee Pennington 
and Henrietta Garrett 
Pennington Silver 
Springs, Maryland and 
said affidavit further 
setting forth that there are 
or may be "Parties 
Unlinown" and that such 
have been foined in the Bill 
of Complaint and that said 
'"P arties Unknown", if any, 
consist of the heirs, 
devisees and Successors in 
title of Franklin Lee 
Pennington and Henrietta 
Garrett Penninofon (If one 
or both are deceased) and 
N»« fi«)r»«(HI deviSMt and 
SucQHSors in title of 



I ASK FOR THIS: 

Frank E. Butler, 

Attorney for 

Complainant 

4336 Va. Beach Blvd. 



Va. Beacht Va. 

4 10,17,24,5-1 4t 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF 
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH, ON THE 8th DAY 
OF APRIL, 1974. 

In Chancery ' 
NoC-74 425 
In re: Adoption of Tracy 
Lee Evans 

By: Trussie Dellette 
Rogers, Jr. and Suzanne 
Rebecca Jones Evans 
Rogers, Petitioners 
To: Lucian Telle Evans 
2717 Bywood Avenue 
Chesapeake, Virginia 

ORDER 

This day came Trussie 
Dellette Rogers, Jr. and 
Suzanne Rebecca Jones 
Evans Rogers, Petitioners, 
and represented that the 
object of this proceeding is 
to effect the adoption of the 
above named infant, Tracy 
Lee Evans, by Trussie 
Dellette Rogers, Jr. and 
III, Suzanne Rebecca Jones 
the Evans Rogers, husband and 
wife, and affidavit tiaving 
been made and filed that 








DlAL-486- 3430 



QUICK CHECK 
CLASSIFIED INDEX 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



] I 



Sun<hln«Ads 1 

PWMnd NotlcM 2 

SPKlM Sirvitti 3 

Transportation 4 

Loit It Found 5 

CorOof Thonkt t 

In Mtmorlom 7 

MonumcntiBurlal Lots i 



REAL ESTATE FOR RENT 



Apartmonts-Furnlstud 71 

Apartments, Unfurnlshad 74 

Oaragtslor Rant 7S 

Farms and Land for Rent it 

MoverS'Storaga 7M 

Houses for Rent 77 

Furnished Houses 77A 



AUTOMOTIVE 



Automobiles for Sale II 

Truflis, Trailers. Jeeps 13 

Wanted Automotive IJA 

Autos, Trucks for hire 13 

Auto Parts, Repairs 14 

Auto Access. Palnllns 14A 

Utility Trailers 15 

•uses ISA 

Wanted Trailers ISB 

Motorcycles, Scooters It 

Aircraft for sale, parts 17 



I RECREATIONAL \ 

Campers, Trailers , . , , W 

Rec. Vehicles for hire liA 

Camp, Sportt Equip !♦ 

Beach Suppnes JO 

Boats, Marine Supplies 11 

BoatsforHIre J1A 



I EMPLOYMENT | 

Help wanted 34 

Resumes, Listings 35 

Jobs Wanted 3« 



Business Opportunities 38 

Wanted to Buy Business 3tA 

Stocks and Bonds le 

Loans AAortgages 40 

Wanted to Borrow 41 



f^STRUCnCW I 

Correspondence Course 41 

Local instruction Classes 43 

General instructions 43A 

Music Dance Dramatics 44 

Private Instructions 45 

instructions Wanted 4a T. 



|pets-uvestock| 

Oo9s, Cats, other PeH 47 

Pet Stud Service 47A 

Horses, Cattle, Etc 4| 

Poultry t Supplies «9 

Wanted Livestock 4tA 



DIRECTORIES 



NOMI H«VICK4iePAIR 6UIDC 
Under Real Estate 



MERCHANDISE J 

Articles tor Sate ,51 

Antiques SIA 

Household Goads'. , . 5» 

Garagt-Rummaga 5JA 

Wanted to Buy 53 

Swap-Trade 53A 

Musical Merchandise .54 

TVRadlo-Starao S 

Electronic Equipment UA 

Coins and Stamps M 

Jewelry t Watches 57 

Wearing Apparel S7A 

Good Things to Eat 51,. 

Farm and Dairy Products J» 

Firewood .-.Jl 

LawnandSarden M 

Saeds-Planls-Flowers IDA 

Feed and Fartlllier ...41 

Farm Impletnents SlA 

AAachlnery and Tools 4il 

Building Materials O 

Buslnass Eauipment 44 



I MOBILE HOMES | 

Mobile Homes for Sale *5 

Mobile Homas for Rent UA 

Mobile Hoftia Movers «SB 

Mobile Home Sites M 

Mablle Homes WanlM I«A 



I ROOMS-HOTELS | 

Roofns with Board U ■ 

Rooms without Board H 

Rooms for Hou iefc eaplnB tf 

i^Hrts-Holcl* 79 

Restaurants 71 

Wanted Rooms or Board 71 

Resort Properly tarReiM 7t 

SiAurbanforRaM>.. TIA 

Out of Town tor Rent TIB 

WantedtoRetit n 

For Rent or Sale n 

Ground Leeses ma 

Business Places for Rent ii 

Offices and Desk Space 11A 

Industrial lor Rent iib 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALEj] 

Industrial for Sale lie 

Businan Proparfy-Sale M 

Invattntent Preparty — I2A 

Apartments for Sale I3B 

Farms-Land-Tlmber 13 

Real EstattNotliM 14 

Fgr Sale Norfolk is 

For Sale VIrgltila Baach 14 

For Salt Chetweak* 17 

Far Sale PorHmooth « 

Condominiums - , - MA 

Suburban for Sale W 

Resort Property for Sale fl 

Out of Town for Sale 97 

Lots for Sale f3 

Exchange Real Estate U 

For Salt or Exchange »S 

Wanlad-Real Estate M 

New Hemes for Sale fj 



PLACE A "PERSON TO PERSON" AD 

IN ANY OF THE ABOVE CLASSIFICSATIONS 

CALL 416-3430 



Lucian Tello Evans, a 
natural parent of said child, 
is a nonresident of the 
State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: 2717 Bywood 
Avenue, Chesapeake, 
Virginia. 

It is therefore Ordered 
that the said Lucian Tello 
Evans appear before this 
Court within ten (10> days 
after publication of this 
Order and Indicate his-her 
attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this matter. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: Sandra Hargrove D.C. 

Bashara & Hubbard 
Board of Trade Bidg. 
Norfolk, VA 

4 10,17,24,5-1-41 



3SpecU Semces 



ISCimpen, 



^35* 



AUTO JUNK 

TowedAway Free 
CaUtS5-4372 



AFGHANS — "Come see 

my pretty crocheted 

afghans", all colors. $35, 
486-6627. 



AIRSTREAM TRAILER - 
1969 31 ft. Solyient, 
excellent condition. Slightly 
used by 1st owner. S7,000 or 
best offer. 340 7704. 



21 Boalt, Marine Supplies 



34IWpWj«toJ 



^41^ 



Waaled 



TELEPHONE SOLICITOR 
- CailbehweenSand 10 a.m., 
3404162. 



MALE OR FEMALE 
Supervisor, 3 hours per day, 
3 to 5 evenings per week. 
Phone 464-4971. 



ALTERATIONS — Ladies, 
Mens, Childrens, 18 years 
experience. Near Hilltop. 
Pick up and delivery in 
Laskin Rd. & Beach area. 
Reasonable. 428-2283. 



RATES: "Person to 
Person" ads for Individuals 
buying, selling, renting, or 
offering a service. Up to 12 
words, only SI per issue, 
add 50 cents for each 
additional 4 words. 

Classified display $2.52 
per column inch, with a 
minimum charge of $5.04 
except on contract basis. 

Business Rates: 25 cents 
per line, minimum charge 
of $2.00. I 

DEADLINE for classified 
display is Noon Monday 
prior to Wednesday 
publication. In column 
classifieds accepted until 5 
p.m. Monday prior to 
Wednesday, publication. 

Place ads at the SUN 
office 138 S. Rosemont Rd,, 
Va. Beach, Va. 23452, or 
mail to Classified Desk, or 
phone 486 3430. Classifieds 
are priced on cash basis; 
payment is due upon 
receipt of statement. 



BLOOO DONORS 
NEEDED 
Earn immediate cash. $40 to 
S60 a month. Blood plasma 
urgently needed. 

NORFOLK 
PLASMA CORP. 

733 Granby St. 623-3173 



BOAT — 1973 Siberg, 255 h.p.- 
Micro-cruiser command 
bridge, fully equipped in- 
cluding CB-VHF radio's and 
m9ny extras. Call Miss Ruth, 
(804) 460-1166. 

SHOUP — 18 ft. mahogany 
boat, needs bottom repaired. 
Boat free, minimum cost for 
trailer and homelite 4 cycle 
engine. 428-5137. 

AUTHORIZED 

T-CRAFT DEALER 
JACK THORNTON 

MOBILE HOMES 



OPENINGS FOR 
3 PEOPLE 

Work part or full time. Good 
Steady income in your area, 
no experience necessary. For 
appointment, call 623 4641. 

START YOUR OWN 

in a fast growing business. 
Unlimited prestige in 
expanding market. Sales 
experience or training 
helpful. For appt. call 497- 
2236. 



CANDY THE CLOWN PH: 855-2510 

Birthdays, Promotionals, 

Grand Openings. 587-3697. ^^^'"''"'^■■1 

DRESSMAKING — And ^f ^M 

Alterations. 10 yrs. ■eMPLOYMENTI 

experience. 497 0982. ■ ■ 

FURNITURE .^^^ ^^^ 

UPHOLSTERED — in my ^^^^^^^^^^^ 

home. Very reasonable ^^^^^^ 

rates. Call Mrs. Smith, 464- ■ w^^^^^^^^mmm^im 

4S79. 34 Help Wanted 



REDUCE SAFE & FAST 
with GoBese Tablets 8< E- 
Vap "water pills", Barr's 
Drug. 



I SUNSHINE ADS 



ETHEL — You get your 
clothes on! 

JOE — Wish weekends came 
everyday so I could be with 
you. Yea, I Do! ! Fuzzy. 

BOOG — I'm glad you 
caught the biggest fish in the 
world. Literally. 

DARLING — Happy 
Anniversary! I Love You! 
Miss You! Number II 



SONDRA 



Steve. 



You ow me ■ 
, and — 



DIANE — Love is a splendid 
thing. It makes a streaking 
bear streak. Tom. 



REDUCE Safe 8. Fast with 
GOBESE Tablets 8< E-Vap 
"water pills", MURDEN 
DRUGS. 

WE HAUL 

OLD CARS AWAY 

623-9194. 



e 



1 1 Automobiles For Sale 

CAPRI — 1973,' 6 cylinder, 
automatic, radio, heater. 425- 
7804. 

CHEVROL%T-1963, 
Convertible. Inspected. 
S150. 486 8623. 



TIM — I made you a 
believer. Get them big Blues, 
boy, Tom. 

EDDIE STEVENS, JR. 
Happy Birthday May 6th, to 
my first born. Love you very, 
very much. (You too, 
daughter) Mom, Tim and 
Chris. See you May 24th! 

J.M. Keep it up, she's still 
smiling! O.M, 

DAD — Forgot to mail that 
card again this year. Sorry 
about that. Patsy. 



CHRYSLER — New 
Yorker, mO. 4 dr. hardtop. 
Excel, cond- $1495. Davis 
Corner Motors, 497-8100. 



CONTlNiflTAL 
Lincoln, ^0. 464 



1967 



3693. 



FIREBIRD 


- 1973, 


V8, 


Automatic. 


Just assume 


balance. Call after 6 — 


427- 


1451. 







FORD — 1973 Pinto Squire 
Station Wagon, air 
conditioned. 420-1152. 



KAT — Keep on trying, you'll 
get him sooner or later! Irma 

DEAR STREAKING BEAR 
— You get your clothes off! 
Shameless Hussy 

AAark — Sorry you're sick; 
hope I can help make it all 
better. Irma 

TOM — When the Bluefish 
are there they'll bite; but 
when they're not there, they 
just won't bit! Timmy. 



FORD — 1970 Station Wagon, 
good condition, $700. or will 
trade. 464-3189. 

FORD — 1973 F-lOO Pickup 
truck, 8 ft. bed with camper 
shell, 302 engine, straight 
stick. $2,850. 588-2540. 

JAGUAR - 1971, V 12, 2 plus 
2, everything. $6500. 588 7435. 

JAGUAR — 1972 V-12, 2 plus 
2, loaded. $6,000. Excellent 
condition. 857 5792. 



T 



STAN — Congratulations, 
but take heed! You'll only be 
No. 1 for one week. Super-T, 

TOM AND TIMMY — Next 
week-end I'll catch one for 
sure! Diane. 

GEORGE 8. MILDRED — 
The hospitality was so great 
I'm coming back! See you 
May 2Sth. (Besides I'm 
Broke!) Get ready for a 
party. Joe 

Belated Happy Birthday to 
Winnie from her friends at 
the Sun. You're not getting 
older, you're getting better. 

ALEXANDER — Look out, 
I'm jusf around the corner! 
Priscilla 

ROD McKUEN — Thanks so 
much for the record - it is 
absolutely fantastic. Jeanne 

r^ 

Announcements 

3 Special Services 



JAGUAR - 1968, XKE, 
coupe, yellow, 4.2 liter 
engine, Michelin tires. $2,100. 
499-6473. 

NOVA — 1966, new tirbs, 
mechanically perfect, $650. 
Days 423 5116, nights 547- 
5666. 



OLDSMOBILE — 1972, '98, 
Excellent condition. Like 
new. $2800. 424 1175. 

OPEL - 1968, good running 
condition. $700. 499 1308. 

PLYMOUTH — 1973 
Duster, 6 cylinder 
automatic, air cond., power 
steering, very clean, $2595, 
427 3498. 

PLYMOUTH — 1963, 4 door, 
new tires, new battery, $350. 
588-254(). 

PONTIAC - 1973 Firebird, 
VB, automatic. Vinyl top. 
Make offer. 427 1451, after 6. 



PONTh 



PONTIAC — 1972 Grand 
Prix, all power, air con- 
ditioned, 427 3325 



.> 


AUTO JUNK 




TOWED 




AWAY FREE 




ANYTIME 




8557488 



RENAULT 

The nation's largest selection of 
used Renaults Irom the nation's 
largest Renault dealer All 
models, colors and prices Most 
arex one owner cars with, our 
famous one year warranty. 

EASTERN AUTO 

933 E LITTLE CREEK RD S88 
1334 



SISTER TINA 
Rcwler and Advuor 

On ail ptoblemi <rf Life such 
^ muriige, biiiineH, love af- 
fain, courtship, tfcohcrf, cw if 
jrou're sick o? in need of 
help, come aee Siitn Tina. 
All leadiiy private and con- 
fidential. CaO foi appoint- 
ment 

340-2774 

2236 VIRGINIA 

BEACH BLVD. 

CORNER GREAT 

NECK RD. Ntxt 

to Hardee's, London Brid^. 

PRIVATE HOME-teUi« 

UNITED HME ^bqal 
CROUP RBAOINCS 
WiLY$l. peRPER^N4 



RAMBLER — 1959: 6 
cylinder automatic; gobd 
cofxJition; $250 or best offer; 
4256572 



THUNDERBIRD — 1959 
Classic. Excellent condition. 
Driven daily. UOO. 587-2075. 

VEGA - 1972 Hatchback, 
automatic, AM FM radio, 
tape player 486-3327 

VOLKSWAGEN BEETLE — 
1968; good coqditlon, $995. 
340-5137, 

VOLKSWAGEN — 1973 
Beetle; built-in tape deck; 
low mileage; ^90. 340 5137, 

VOLKSWAGEN - '67. 
Perfect condition. Special 
$895. Davis Corner Motors, 

4978100 



lilMmcyiMfScotMm 



ENERGY OPPORTUNITY 
Crisis lor some brings op- 
portunities for others. Local 
business man with sky 
rocketing growth looking for 
mature married person to 
assist with management 
responsibilities. Work in on a 
part-time basis. Mid-teen 
potential lor first year. By 
appointment only, call 547 
3907, 

BABYSITTER — In my 
home, 70th. St., Virginia 
Beach. Call 428-3428. 

, $2.75 PER HOUR 
Part or full time, ideal for 
civilian or military. We need 
10 people to work in sales and 
service dept. No experience 
necessary., Call Mrs. Black, 
499 1269, 



TELEPHONE 

SOLICITORS 

TW PAY 

PLUS COMMISSION 

TUES. & THURS. 
FROM 

5:30 to 8:30 P.M. 

excellent 
Working Conditions 

EXPERIENCED WILY 
NEED APPLY 

CaU 486-3430 

Between 9 5 
Monday thru Friday 



TELEPHONE 
SALES WORK 
(Part-Time) 

From Our Olf ice 

Hours 9: 30 1:30 

and 5-9 pm 

Hourly Wage 

Plus Bonus 

All Invited 

To Apply 

Handicapped Welcome 

Call Mr. Barnette 

4867026 



LADIES 

BRANCH MANAGER 
TRAINEES 

Local progressive 
company will train 3 ladies 
for Branch Manager 
positions. Must have neat 
appearance. 

$610 month to start 
Pius bonuses and benefits 

Call 499-2763 



ALARM INSTALLATION 
Ii SALES 

MEN 
NEEDED 

NOW 
$150 a week Salary 
Call Mr. Nelson z\ 857-5442 



HAIRDRESSER 8. 
VIVIAN WOODARD 
BEAUTY 
CONSULTANTS. 
Immediate openings, full 
or part-time. Call Mrs. 
Vesely, 340-3230, 420-6808. 



MALE OR FEMALE — Part 
time, day or evenings. Good 
Summer work. For 
Appointment call 499 2715. 



MEN - WOMEN 

WITH AUTOMOBILES 
Earn Extra Money 
In Your Spare Time 
Good opportunity for 
shift workers, housewives, 
etc.Ifyouhave3 to 4 
days available and can 
spend 4 to 5 daylight 
hours on pleasant out- 
door work, sign up to de- 
liver new telephone direc 
tories in Virginia Beach 
and surrounding rural 
areas. 

APPLY DAILY 

Starting WED., MAY I 

9 \M. to 4 P.M. 

AT 
FOUNDRY UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 
2801 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Vi^nia Beach, Va. 

NO PHONE CALLS 
ACCEPTED 
REUBEN H. 
DONNELLEY CORP. 

An Equal 
Opportunity Employer 



S2A Horses, Cattle, Etc. 



124 COWS & HEIFERS 

Lane Gwaltney, Windsor, Va. 

A-U-C-T-l-O-N 

MAY 3rd-FRI.-10:30 a.m. 
MILKING HERD • 100 COWS 

DHI Avg. 13,906m 476f 
24 BRED HEIFERS 

(To Begin Freshening in August) 101,770 lbs. VA. MILK BASE 
ALSO SELLING • MILKING EQUIPMENT 
2-600 Gal. Mojonnier Bulk Tanks 
and Cieamety Package 
DeLaval Pipeline, 6 Milking Unite and DeLaval Vacuum Pump 



AUCTIONS, 
REALTY...°c ^ 



1301 HCKMITAGE ROAD \ ■04.39.-.4.3 

RlCHMONoX VIRGINtA 23220 



38 Busineu Opportunities 



YAMAHA — 1973, 350 CC. 
$795. Call after 6 p.m. 425 
7Mg 

4 



SA. 



SPARE TIME BUSINESS 

Ownyour own profitable vending business. $200 to $600 month- 
ly earnings possible in your spare time (day or eve.). NO 
SELLING. If selected, you will be servicing company esublished 
locations. 

OUR COMPANY IS A SUPPLIER 
OF NABISCO SNACK ITEMS. 

REQUIREMENTS: $1,000 to $5,000 CASH INVESTMENT, 
(secured by machines and merchandise) 

good character, dependable auto, and 6 
to 9 spare hours weekly. Income starts 
immediately! We supply product, machines, 
locations, expansion financing, buy back 
Option, and professional guidance. If you 
are sincerely interested in applying for this 
geauine opportunity toward financial 
success, please call or write (include 
phone number) for personal interview in 
your area to: ^^ robert l. Anderson 

WORLD INDUSTRIES INC. 
Executiw Suite 303 
1919 East 52nd Street 
Indianapolis, Indiana 462% 
Telephone 131 7)257-5767 



INSURANCE Secretary — 
Insurance agency has 
career opportunity for 
individual interested in 
becoming an insurance 
secretary. Call 42S-7220. 



WANTED 
IMMEDIATELY! 

6 men and women to start 
in good paying |ob. 

Excellent working 
conditions. Bonuses and 
other company benefits 
provided. 

No experience necessary. 
Wewlll train you. 

Call 499-27(3 



36 Jobs Wanted 



BABYSITTING in my 
home. Infant to 3 years. 428- 
4058. 

BABYSITTING - In my 
home or yours. Available 
anytime. Call 490-2292 

LITTLE FRIEND to play 
with, my mommy will take 
care of you while yours 
works. Windsor Woods. 340- 
6765. 



NEED CHALLENGE 

Creative vouna man, 
impatient with bureaucracy, 
places restless finger in the 
wind, lor opportunity to 
fully utilize talents. Experi- 
ence in law and 
administration, able 
organizer, coordinator and 
troubleshooter, excellent 
writer, individualistic in 
style and interest, yet can 
motivate others with 
diplomacy and right touch 
of humor. Will consider 
travel or relocation, 
partnership or 
employment, any form of 
challenge! Write Box C250, 
Virginia Beach Sun, 138 S. 
Rosemont Rd., Virginia 
Beach, Va. 23452. 

38 ButineM Opportunities 

A CHANCE TO 

SUCCEED— develop your 
own business. Call 340-1317 
after 5 PM. 



43A General Instructions 

VOICE LESSONS — 
Beginners, advanced. James 
Morrisson, 428-0587. 



44 Mode 



GRIMES 

MUSIC SCHOOL 

Private Music Lessons in 
Pembroke Area 

5 String Banjo-Tenor Bsnio- 
Uuitar-Electrlc Bass-Hawa- 
llan Guitar-Mandolin. 

CaU After 4 P.M. 499-1428 



45 Private Instnictions 



AIREDALE TERRIERS - 
AKC reg., shots, ready to go. 
$100. cash. 499 7713. 

KITTENS — 1 male and 1 
female, 7 weeks old. Free to 
good homes. 486-2800. 

PEKINGESE PUPS - AKC 
registered. Call 464 5331. 

PUPPIES 

(4) small adorable females. 
Free to good homes. 116 
London Bridge Rd. 486-8604. 



RABBITS — Adult' and 
Babies, Checkers 8> Dutch. 
486-6324. 

ST. BERNARD— Female, 11 
weeks, Male, 1 year, AKC 
registered 545 7483. 

51 ArticteiP<wSite 

CAMERA — BTonica 52A2-'4 
SLR, used only once, perfect 
condition, $390. 425 1991. 

INSULATION - y/i" full 
thick. 4.29 roll. Arco Hard- 
ware, 3365 Military hwy. 8S3- 
1379. . 

SlAAiitiquet 

OLD ROLL TOP desks for 
■;^le, 8 to choose Irom. 

DESKS, INC. 
3411 High SI. 399 0979 



$458.00 delivers 3 room 
outfit. Early American, 
Spanish or Modem. Isf 
small monthly payment 
starts 45 days after 
delivery. Household 
Furniture Corp., 1917 
Lafayette Blvd., near 
corner of Tidewater dr., in 
Norfolk, Phone 622-4165. 



S2ll«ilriialdGoo4* 



FURNITURE from Model 
homes. Bedroom or Living 
Room, $99.95; Dinette, 
Mattress set, Recllner, 
Bunk Beds, t68eaehi Maple 
Boston Rocker, $45. Easy 
terms. Call Mr. Kay at 623- 
4100, dealer. .^ 

STEREO FIREPLACE BAR 
— Stereo fireplace with 
liquor cabinet, AN\fm 
stereo • track and 
phonograph. ' Beautiful 
cabinet only 4 months old. 
Paid $350. Yours for $275. 425- 
1991. 

TWIN BEO - With box 
spring and mattress. 420- 
3fH6. 



52A Ganse-Rumm^ 



m 



GARAGE SALE - AAav 4t»i, 
9:30 to 5:30. Decorator Items, 
cost price. Assorted 
memorabilia. 2808 Pine 
Ridge Lane. Chesopeian 
Colony. 



53 WantMl to Buy 

ELECTRIC TRAIN 
COLLECTOR - Retired 
railroad man. Any kind, any 
condition, pay good price. 
5456242. 

ELECTRIC TRAINS — 
Lionel, American Flyer, 
Ives, others. Cash. 497-4213. 

WE NEED BADLY 
Cash paid for cameras, tape 
recorders, stereos, TV's, 
Band I nstruments, 
Typewriters, guns. 

LITTMAN'S 
201 City Hall av. 622-6989 

58 Good Things Too Eat 

WE SELL Live Crabs, by 
the dozen or by the bushel. 
Earl Smith Oyster Co., 947 
Hurds rd., 340-5171. 



63 Building Materials 

HOME Builders 8< Con- 
tractors • Let us help you 
with that new home, ad- 
ditions or repairs. We can 
furnish materials from 
basement to attic and aid you 
in financing. Phone 
KELLAM 8. EATON 427-3200. 
■■■^■I^IHBHIIBikHHB 

64 Bi^f inuf s tqulpmmt 

REN^O^BUY^TSTir 
used office furniture. Ex- 
rental desks $49 & up. New 
damaged files 139 8< up.rFree 
delivery. 

DESKS, INC. 
3411 High St. 397-7883 

73 ApartwwBtt-^urnltlwd 

TO SHARE — Small 
cottage near ocean. Woman 
only. 428 18(^4. 




VIRGINIA BEACH 

'AM». rMn. 1 room otncitncy; 
weokly and moniniy run: color TV, 
batic mating and coolilngulcrallt. all 

utiuiles. 

VIRGINIAN 

MOTOR APTS. 

310 24th f to 

428-5333 



76 A Mover»45tonige 

FURNITURE MOVING — 
iWashers, dryirs, 
refrigerators. Pianos, Etc. 24 
hours, 7 days a week and 
holidays no extra charge. 
053-93^. 

WILL MOVE ANYTHING, 
24 hours a day, 7 days a 
week! Don't delay. Call 
today! 588-4715. 



77 Houses for Rent 



PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA 
- 3300 Rainier Ct., 3 
bedroom Townhouse, 
fenced yard, $225 mo. All 
appliances including 
washer and dryer. 

78 Resort Property-Rant 

HOUSES 8. 
APARTMENTS 
Available on a yearly or 
short term iMSis. 

DUCKS REAL ESTATE 

323 Laskin rd. 

428-4882 



MOUNTAIN LODGE 

For the large family, 5 
bedrooms, 2 fireplaces, 
large screened porch, deluxe 
kitchen with modern ap- 
pliances, lake, boating, 
fishing, hiking, recreational 
facilities for all ages. West of 
Harrisonburg, Va. Write 
Dah Stickiey, .ttt Penin 
Laird, Va. 




86 For Sale Viifinia Beach 

FOX RUN - Spacious 3 
bedroom, 2 bath, family 
room; 1 year old. Mid 40's. 
No agents. 499 4835. 

WINDSOR WOODS— 

$29,950 
3 bedroom brick ranch with 
large family room; patio 
with privacy fence and 
many extras. Call Robert or 
Ronnie Fowler, 486 4041 or 
486 1369. We trade. HIggins 
Realty, Inc., REALTOR 

VIRGINIA BEACH 
(Borough) — 4 bedroom 
Colonial. Early p(»ession. 
Zoned AAulti-famlly. Call Roy 
Wilkes, 46-4041 or 486 1796. 
We trade. HlMins Realty, 
Inc. REALTOR 

96 Warned Red Estate 

CASH TALKS 

Webuyfcsell. Need Homes 
Call 464 6205. Crowgev 
Realty. ' 

4 



*lr 



Real Estate 



TlwSiiii WKlM «di>.llliy1,1«74-fi|iB< 



Financ^^uslness/Economy 



:ONSUMER| 

Families can 
form a food 
buyers' club 

By Peter Weaver 

Q. Are tliere any reBu-ica(»iB against forming a 
buyers' ciub-to purchase food at whdesale prices? 
What's the best way to form a club? - C.L.A., 
Woodland Hills, Calif. 

A. Unless smne obscure local ordinance prohibits 
buying and selling food in small lots, there are no 
restrictions agairet forming a cooperative buyers' 
club. It's best to start with 10 to 15 families. 

Vohmteers pick up the tirouo's order from 
wholesalers and pay cash for it Membov meet at 
someone's garage and pick up their ordera. CIUD 
members get their food products (or any oUior 
iroAiets you decide to buy) at wholesale cost phis a 
slight markup or monthly fee to keep the chib alive 
imimeograi^ costs, mailings and wlatnot). 

Buyers' clubs, according to the Cooperative League 
of the U.S.A., are easy to start but some don't last 
because the group has no goal and active volunteers 
tend to lire. 

I've made a deal with the Cooperative League to 
offer a kaflet on bow to start a co-op buying club. It 
gives step-by-step instruction plus some organizational 
and buyii« caveats. You can get a copy by soiding 10 
coits and a self-addressed, stamped envdope care of 
this newspaper. IMaric your request: Peter Weaver- 
Buyers' Chibs. 



I'feft 





realty seminar 



4th Pembroke effhe planned 



The Pembroke Four building, another offlce 
building in PembrdKe Office Park, is now 
und«r construction and is scheduled for 
completion in November. The 60,000- 
square-foot buiUing will house 55 tenants. 



Ihe five-story structure, ^ cost |2 mlUion, 
will be built near the intersection of 
Independence and Virginia Beach 
Boulevards. It is owned by the Terry Corp. 
of Vir^nia. 



Ite first annual real 
estate buUaeas seminar 
sponsored by the Old 
Dominion University 
Institute of Muagement 
win be Tuesday at the 
Americano Motor Hotel in 
\%ginta Beach. 

The seminar is draigned 
(or real estate executive, 
realty personnel and Aeir 
business sdviiers. The 
soninar hopea to provide 
up-to-date information, 
tactics and techdques in 
te real estate industry in 
the fMda of sales law, 
accounting for sales, tax 
shelters, Investment 
anaylysts, financing 
acquisitions and 
developments, feasibility 
studies, phis engineering 
and office building 
consideratioos. 

LECTURERS inchide R. 
Stuart BaMwin, executive 
vice-president of Baldwin 
k Gregg Ltd., Norfolk; R. 
Sydney Bradbury, chief 
iditnner, Baldwin k Gregg; 
Dr. Robert C. Burton, 
consulting economist and 



dean of the Frederick 
campus of Tidewater 
Community College; 
Morton Goldmeier of 
Goodman k Co., Norfolk; 
attorney Rldiard D. Guy of 
Owen. Guy, Rhodesft Bets, 
Virginia Beach: RuiseU S. 
Heath, assistant vice- 
president, United Virginia 
MortgagB Corp., Norfolk, 
and Michael Katslas, 
manager, office leairing, 
Pembroke Realty k 
Insurance Agency Inc., 
Virginia Beach. 

Also, Jolm W. Kerr Jr., 
a»A and attorney, 
Goodman k Co.; attorney 
Owen B. Pickett of Virginia 
Beach; A. Framris RItter 
Sr., CPA, Goodman It Ca, 



and Louis Searlonan, CPA 
and attwney and 
chainnan, department of 
accounting, Old 
Dominion Unlvorsity. 

THE PROGRAM begins 
Tuesday at 8:30 a.m. with 
coffee and dou^uts being 
served. Informational 
program begin at • a.m. 
The lectures conchide at 
5:30 p.m. with social hour 
conduding at 6:30 p.m. 

Fee for the seminar is 
|6S, which inchides cdlM 
breaks and luncheon. 

Addittonal InformatiQii 
and registration may be 
(Aitained by caUIng the 
Institute of Management at 
OUI Donjon Univsrsily, 
48»«NI0. axt. SSI or 317. 



Mind Your Money C&P to upgrstle seTvices 



Q. When I wrote you about my Magnavox stereo, I 
thou^t I was just letting off steam. I had no idea you 
could get siKh speedy action. The dealer did his best to 
fix the set but it was defective. In a few weeks, 
Magnavox replaced the stereo receiver with a new one. 
Thai's really fast service. — Mrs. E.S. (city withheld 
by request). 

A. If 8 taken several years to build, but we now have 
an effective method of dealing with product 
complainU. We can't promise speedy results every 
time, but we've got a fair batting average. It's all in 
getting the right person. Most major comparilies want 
to hear from unhaj^y customers but some have 
prcMems with their communication lines. When 
writing about product problems, be sure to include 
names, dates, addresses, order numbers (whenevM- 
possible) and other po'tinent data. 

Q, Wl9 do utilities in some states charge more than 

ttiose in oOm states? Is there apy way to get these 

rates t«dueed?-T.P., N.Y.. N.Y. 
A. UtiUty rates are based on the rate the utility pays 

for fuel (which is rising) plus a fair rate of return on 
investment Rates must be approved by state utility 
commissions. Gas and elecb-ic utilities alM come 
under Inderal Pow«: Commission regulation and 
telephone companies come under Federal 
Commuidcations Conmission regulation. 
' Rates differ because fuel and other costs diff a*. It is 
possible to dialteDge utility rates and even get some 
rednc^oiL But, it isn't easy. You can get a booklet, 
"H<w to Challenge Your Electric UtiBty," by sending 
one dollar to: Envinmttiental Action Foundation, 720 
Dupoat Circle &iiMii«. Washington, D.C. 30036. 

<t Is the additional cost of installing douUe-pane 
windovrs worth it? Wlmt kind of drapes are best to 
r«ttin or hdd out heat? - Mre. W.C.L.. Palo Alto, 

Oiiif. 

A. Over thrte or four yeare time, double-pane 
windows should xaatt than pay for themselves. They're 
expeci^ good at keeping heat inside during winter. 
Tli^'re less effective at keeping out heat from sun 
penetration in summer. Closed fabric drapes are best 
to retain heat 

0. rvebeardahiminwiwiriagcanbedangerous. Is 
this true? How <ain you tdl if a home has akiminim 
wiring? Mrs. T.C., Chicago, IIL ^ «„ 

A. If s not ttie aluminum wiring so much as Qie 
condDioatiao of aluminum wirii« witii capper wiring. 
Hie Cotmma Product Safety Cwoamiwioo is 
investigBting reports of fires catued by ahimimm 
wmnf hooted tq? with coiHper wiring Qmugh 
apdUances and other e^iipment 

Most homes, apartments, mobUe homes and even 
commercial buikUngs buUt since 1965, ot buildings 
wMch have lad additional wiring installed since U8S, 
probably have some ahiminun wiring. 

There are three warning signals that pidnt to 
possOite trouble witti ahiminum wiring: 1) If the face 
plate on your fuse box is warm to the touch when you're 

ushM s heavy appliance; 3) If you smeU a stnnge, 
cbmdcsl odor in the area of the fuse boK (innilation 

may be smoldering); 3) Perstatent or Intermittent 
flkkering of lights not traceable to «qr one appliance. 
If you notice any of these danger signs, have an 
dectrkdan die«± the fiae box. Adjustmeirts can be 
made. It duuldn't require rewiring. 

YOUR £NERGY MONEY: An automatfc wasfear 
onhr IMS around 100 kilowatt hours of energy a year 
but the dryer uses 10 tin^s that amount If you can nm 
dry your ^wah, so much tbe better. Otharwtoe, make 
sure die ^byer vatb dean, has no obstnictiom, and 
the ant filter B dean (it shouM be desMd after each 

ijbyh« fc*d): Da^t ovenfry clothes. They can be 
rvmoved sU^ay'iiioist fw \xmciat. 

Ktaig FntairM Syaiicate, Inc.. 1>74. 
fMK W»mw wtleoam qimtkm from wsdw» 
toe pamibh iminhk cohimn. F!mw «nd JMtwi 
to Mb fe <«» <rf y^vn*' S«* Sin, 138 Roit- 
too ot Rfd. Wrgteii Bwch, Va. 2MS2. 

!(feUJIIG-.REIITWIG-.Wtlll6^TRAWII6 

BISSEH REALH, INC 

"A Rejected Mme In R^ Eitete" 

TMia SNppnf CtRlir 
4316Wi|iiinaMehBN. 

rwpiia Btaek^Va. 23452 
SMiS 

Iflu Vanes. CttlS^TIM LonsUPowwa, 43^SMI 

RENTiaS 

CHUSM-Wi 

matm-mi 



The Chesapeake and 
Potomac Telephone 
Conpaqy of Virginia has 
earmarked some $166,000 
for improvements to its 
Virginia Beach operations. 

The mon^ will finance 
about three miles of 



underground cable from 
the C & P communications 
centei' at Indian River and 
Providence Roads to the 
Greenbrier Farms 
subdivision. This will 
enable the cmnpany to 
meet commitments for 



service to some 6,000 new 
residence buildings in 
Greeid>rier Farms. 

The project is a portion of 
nearly 123 million C ft P 
has allocated for 
improvements throughout 
the slate. 



Chamber studying 
bus tour proposal 

The Virginia Beach Chamber of 
Commerce Travel and Tourism 
Committee is considering a prc^xwal to 
offer bus tours from the Beach to 
Williamsburg and Tangier Island this 
summer as an attraction for those who 
Visit the resort city. 

The proposal was discussed during 
the committee's monthly meeting 
recently at the Chamber offKes on 
Pacifk Avenue. 

The bus tours, if arranged, wouU be 
operated privately at no expense to Ae 
city. Motel and hotel owners reportedly 
havf indicated they wouU support ttie 
program tiy displaying information 
concerning the tours in areas available 
to guests. The information would be 
furnished by the tour operator at no 
expense in the city. 



Amey named new 
assistant manager 



Loy Franklin Amey of 
Virginia Beach has been 
named assistant managa- 
(rf the Nwfolk general 
office of New York Life 
IrauranceCo. 

He was graduated from 
the UnivaBity of North 
Carolina to 1968 with a 
degree in business 
adtatinistntion. He joined 



the insurance company in 
December, 1971, as an 
agent in Virginia Beach. 
He is a m«nber of the 
company's honor chib for 
]m&m agento. 

Mr. Amey is a member 
of the National AsMdation 
of Life Uidorwriten and 
toe National Association of 
Security Deaters. 



HOW 
MUCH 
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UTILITIES 




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ALLUnUTIES 
INCLUDED! 
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Wimm It cMMiet irlcis 

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2-boClrooin Typo IV S238 tlorgor living room, boleony 

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3-bodroom S250 (IMImIM 

3-bodroom TownhouM S31S i1732M|.«t.bia, 2MbMtii, 

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Phone (804f499-98M 

loff wncMuck Rd. baivNan VtogNda aaidi SM. a tna a«( 




a— « J 



"Tiixury 
Garden ApartmenU 
And Town Houioi 

ro» HnrsMS RMi Off iiMsvti 
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Ideal Location 

HAVaOOD HMJLM H gw HW Wy H t lnHd 
ftorfalk, aMl Ma raaart ai«a vf VtogiNla ' 
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m mimary liNtaUallMii. TM M aysd dd 
dlatMiiNy aMraii from HAVOOOD HALLS, 
noad af driving fvr dally 



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JoaPigsMlaa 
Realtor 



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RMitor ru 
,USTOM 

llEALTY COtr. 

To BUY Of SELL 

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cui(to4) 425-3800 

1788 Vs. Beach Blvd. Vs. Baach, Va. 



HOME SERVICE — REPAIR GUIDE 




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497.1<n5 
24 hr. SERVICE 


Genenri Contractor 


BLACK 
BROTHERS 

Baildsn 

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niiMliMe ffldln 

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422i222i 



*27-0P44 



Tilt 



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VA. BEACH LAWN 
MOWER ft WELDING 
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n. 85S-5370 



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N9#ds Rsffiodslino? £^ 

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ort»-P» 

fw ITM MtimaM*. 




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ftw B-IO-TN Sun-«l4»Mtoy, Itay 1, 1»74 



I3iaiamigiigiigiigii2ii2iigiigirjisi 




PRC-"EN 



!!• 



RSES 



ir 







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1 








Sensible Growth 

Because no growth makes no sense at all. 











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c? 






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FESSIONAL 

REALTY CORP. 






^: 




V 






'W- 



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AREY 







AGOOI 

"liSTER? 

LET'S f 



TALI^ 
PROFrr 

eati 425^8000 NOW 

Rui Opyortuntty for ' 



48tii Year No. t9 Clr|uiatio^ 22,000 





VA STATF UBRARY 
RICH«Ofi|» VA 25219 



V)Mneiday,May8,1974 




Mkhf 



IlU>]|fBLEl 



03 4973524 



City of VirgiNi Baadi, Va. 



Q Copyright 1974 
BMC/) Publlthing Corp. 



15 Cents 




in sinpnse election 



f» ' 






Surmise was the word in th# Tu^iay Virginia 
f^>ach Cibv Council electioiii as inc^bents Reid 
Krvin. Murray Malbon and Garlancf IwleU were 
defeated in their bids for re-election. 

IHnofficial results tabulated from al| 34 precincts 
show Patrick Standing h^s beaten Mr. MalbQn to 
win an at-large seat by a vote of 7,551 jo 7,101 in the 
tightest race oS the election. Mr. Malfibn's running 
inatf^ Mayor Robert CromweU, led dbe voter total 
in tM^ at-iarge race with 10,031 votes to win his third 
<'0uncil term. ; 

' After a bitter contest and lieavily-financed 
' anipaign for the Lynnhaven / Borough seat, 
ihaiienger John Griffin narrowly defeated Vice- 
tnayor Reid Ervin by 870 votes^' 
' ■ f' 

Mr: Griffin pulled in 12,138 voles to 11,216 tot Mr. 
Erviij. f 

CfHmcilman Garland Isdeljf was ups^ in ttie 



SUNBEAMS 



"I cdttidar Tht Sun the Virginia 
Beachvnewipaper. Our city is roally first- 
cUn.''^P.S.. Lyniihaven 

* 

"The Sun cova^ all of Virginia Beach, 
not just the nrnfitmn like the Beacon." 
•^ C.K., l^peviUe 

"Your pap^ putt Virpnia Beach 
sports firft, an4 tfwt's the way it^ouM 
be." - T>^ L^nhaven 



For'homeielivery phone 486-3430 



4; . - :^*h 



K^ntpsville Borough race by 5>r. Henry McCoy. Dr. 
McCoy received 10,869 votes to Mr. Isdell's 9,858 
vote total. 

Gayn^te Winter's attempt to unseat Dr. 
Clarence Holland in the Bayside Borough race was 
unsuccessful. Dr. Holland received 12,280 votes to 
Ms. Winter's 9,168. 

Incumbent Councilman Floyd Waterfield, who 
was um^jposed in the Pungo Borough, received 
16,351 votes. 

Unctfficial totals for the remaining at-large 
candidates are as follows: Reba McClan^ 4,368; 
M^era Obemdorf 3,080; Cecily Macdonald 2,642; 
.loel Smith 2,3^; Sandy BoUn 2,106; Robert 
Sparrow 1,713; Edward Lynk 1,494; Peter J<^ 789; 
Drewry Little 662, and Philip Muldez 352. 

As was expected, voter turn-out was light with 
approximately 24,400 persons going to the polls out 
of 78.466 registered voters in the city. 

Transit service 



stalls for lack 
of city contract 



DoMg Meeics 
is ^ student 
WRh an idea 




-PageH 



Qoies speeds 

Irack crown 

to Bayside 



«• 



^Pagm6 



"KALEIDOSCOPE of Dance" Is the 
varied musical program oWrared by the 
Virginia Beach Qvic Ballet Saturday 
atS p.m. and Sunday at 3 p.m. at Plaza 
Junior Hi{^ Schod ....Page 9. 

CONTACT is a new crisis 
intervention and tdephone cotms^ng 
service ^wnsored by two Virginia 
BeiuA churcl^s. Volunteers trained in 
bwic cmfflse&ig techniquei help with 
pormnd proU&ns. The number to call 
Is 428-22ll....Page 11. 



CANDIDATES f#r King Neptune's 
CoufI will be preseAed to Oie piWic *^ 
the Neptune Fesftval Tea Tuesday 
torn 2-4 p.m. at the Hilton. Inn. The 
CouAdl of Garden Qubs gX Virginia 
B^fh sponsors tjie tea. Reservations 
and ^Qraiation may be obtained from 
Vicl^ Rodgers, 497-0985. 



Inside 

One section 16 pi«Ba 

Oaiaified ..,; •••••• ^J 

Comment • 2 

Featurei — ■ * 

f^Mwn .„ ■•• "•" ••• • 

Qfg^ttninf .......; « • •• » 

ufs Sftfles .»...•.••••»••••••"*.*«•••••"■■ "' "O • I 

fUMon,^.... " .-«-.. 11 




CoiHracts far a Beach tnis 
servk% continue to float back 
and forth in the mail between 
Virginia Beach city officials 
and Ncrfolk Oty Hall while 
conuMit«« wait 

The restoration of transit 
service in the Beach still awaits 
the i^ag tf an agraemeat for 
laervUiebet 

fibiab pn^iwH#»i 
the service and mailed it to 
NorfcA for ^proval AprU 18. 
Last week City Hanger Roger 
Scott received • counter 
proponl ftom Nwfolk City 
Manager G. Robert Hoose. 



The two cities, the Tidewater 
Transportation District 
Commission (TTD) and 
representativei of the Norfolk 
Tidewater Metro Transit Co. 
(TMT) have lieen negotiating 
plans for mn-e than a mon^ 
now to provide temporary bus 
service in the Beach until the 
TTD can establish regional 
sa^i<%. "Hie Virginia Beach 
aty Council had agreed to 
subsidize the service op to 
$150,000. 

THKRE ARE TWO major 
differences between the 
contracts which have been 
profosed. Viit{lnia Beach says 
"the daily revenues to be 
credited to (he Vu-glnia Beach 
servKe shall be calculated as 
the product of the number of 
panengers boarding or 
disembarking in each zone and 
die appropriate z«ie fare." The 
BMch contract caUs for TMT to 
make a daily count f& 
pasMngos usti^ die service 
during the first 30 days and a 
passenger dieck once a wedc 
thereaft«'. 

The Norfolk version of the 




Closed 
oourlcM 



Tkc VlrgiiUa Back<ity 
Coiactt n«f Mema»yt» IS 
tai elai«4 s^ion. 
to Mithcr the pabHc 
■Mr the fnn. The agenda 
Htt«4 "i^poinlneBU t« 
eoaaitoslMM" and a 
"1^1" mitter for 
MciiMlMi, la 17 neetb^t 
W^Miynr. UwCwBCiU 
has act far atat h««n aai 
W ailMaliii bdrini etai^ 



contract counts money instead 
of |)eople and eliminates the 
passenger counts. Norfolk 
proposes Oie daily revenues to 
be credited to Virginia Beach 
"be ttwi>actual fares collected 
and recwded by t|)e TMT 
cashier." 

Beach dty officifls say ttiqr 

.,dM^i'kBow^wMt -^- <^WP>% 

fetfween tlK^,t«d iWllippi.Hir' 

calculatii^ Qk revenuel <^ 
be, and wotft until th^ meet 
with NorfiK representlltivei, 

The Norfolk contract ilso 
diminates an "escape clause" 
which Virginia Beach city 
offkiab had priqwsed so if ibe 
revenue Iom of the service was 
toon than the $150,000, the city 
couki be released firom the 
contract. Morfdk stipulates the 
contract «d]l be bindhig for one 
year. 

BF.ACH CITY offidals hope 
to nmA with representatives of 
TTD, TMT and Norfolk city 
officials this week to wwk out 
dWereoces in the contracts. If 
aB ipes well, ttie Vfa-^nia Beedi 
City Council will review tiie 
contract Monday. 

ShouM die Beach Council 
agree with the proposals and 
sign the contract, it would then 
be sent to the Norfolk Council 
for approval. The Norfolk 
Council meets on Tuesday, but 
its iiacatain if Uiey waoM 
review die contract at that time 
or postpone tile matter again- 

Once both cities agree on tiie 
cmtracts it will be at least 
aiwUier 30 days before buses 
will be on tiie road. The service 
was origiially scheduled to 
begin May 1, according to a 
t«native timetable set up by 
Virginia Bead) city cffknals. 



«*<f^ 



THE WINNERS 






JOHjV GRIFFIN, 40, defeated 
incumbent Vice-mayor Rdd Ervin, 51, 
for the Lynnhaven Borough Council 
seat. In the hottest contest in the 1974 
Councilmanic election, Mr. Griffin 
charged Mr. Ervin witii voting on 
zoning matters with a conflict of 
interest, and using his council seat for 
personal pin for his contracting firm. 
Mr. Griffin sirtd since he is not a 
contractor, he can vote without conflict 
of interest. He campaigned as "a 
concerned citizen" promising to help 
Beach city services catch up witii 
public demand. 

A former newsman, Mr. Griffin is 
now a stockbroiter tor Legg, Mason and 
Co-. Inc. in Norfolk. 



ROBKRT CROMWELL. 41, 

incumbent mayor and at-large 
councilman, was elected to serve a 
third term on tiie City Council. He 
emerged a victor in the contest between 
13 candidates for two at-large seats. 
Mr. Cromwell and Incumbetit 
Councilman Murray Malbon ran on tiie 
same political ticket as "men of 
experience" in dealing with city 
problems. 

Mr. Cromwell was firat elected to ttie 
Council in 1966. He served as vice- 
mayor from 1970 to 1972 and was 
elected mayw by the other councilmen 
in 1972. He is a member of the law firm 
Cromwell, Culverhouse and Whitehurst 
and is active in local, state and national 
Bar Associations. 



DR. CLARENCE HOLLAND, 44, 

incumbent Bayside Councilman, won 
the right to return to Council for a 
second term over challenger Gaynette 
Winter, 33, in the Bayside Borough 
contest. Dr. Holland campaigned 
primarily on his knowledge and 
experience as a councilman, while Ms. . 
Winter claimed he was inaccessable to 
the people and did not have time to 
serve on the Council because of the time 
involved in his medical practice. 

Dr. Holland is a general practitioneer 
in the Bayside Borougli. He has served 
on the Beach Council since 1970 and 
represents the city on the executive 
board of 4he Southeastern Virginia^ 
Planning District Commissim. 




\i 



H 




PATRICK STANDING. 33. has won a 
victcxy in the ra(» for two at-large 
seats on ttie Beacli Council. Mr. 
Standi^, who has been one of the most 
vocal candidates, based much of his 
campaign on his background as an 
wban planner able to d«il With the city 
growth and developmrait problems. He 
advocated construction of a clinic for 
rape victims and the establishment <tf a 
housing auUwrity to develop more low- 
meda>ate mcome houshig In the city. 

A former dhrectw of tiw Vii^nia 
Beach Planning Department, Mr. 
Standing is now presidmt of Standing, 
Barrow and Stell, Inc., professional 
irianning cnlsultantB. 



FLOYD WATERFIELD. 36. 
unopposed in the Piingo Borou^, will 
lie serving his second term on the 
Council. Mr. Waterfield was first 
elected to Council in 1970. At ttut tlnw 
he ran on a pdiUcal ticket which was 
originally known at Uie "Nine for 
Progress" and included Dr. Clarence 
Holland. No such tidcet was formed 
during this election, and Mr. Waterfield 
did no r^l campaigning since he had m 
opposition for his re-elecUon t»d. 

Mr. Waterfield is Uie president of Uie 
Prinoen Anne Plaza branch of the 
Pint and Merchants Bank. He is also a 
volunteer with the Emergency 
Coronary Care Program and tlw Fire 
and RMcue Squad. 



DR. HKNRV McCOY. 41, was 

successful in unseating incumbent 
Councilman Garland Isdell, 49, for Uie 
Kemps ville Borough seat. Dr. McCoy's 
campaign for election urged more 
"quality education" in Virginia Beach. 
He proposes lo use the city's new 
bonding capacity and possibly 
revenue sharing funds to provide 
increased monies for education. 

Dr. McCoy is a dentist in the 
Kempsville Borough. He Is chah-man of 
the Board of Tidewater Community 
College and is a member of the Board ot 
Visitors and the Student Affairs 
Committee (A Old Dominion University. 
He is also chairman of the Chinese 
Corner branch (rf Pe<^te Bank. 



! 



DGG'S LIFE FOR CATS 



CouncS passes ordinance to confine pets 



Area kitties <m the loose will soon have to 
beware mi only t^ dop, JM^alio ihe dog 
catchers. c* «» 

The Virginia Beach City Council despite 
opposition from several cat own«^, paswd an 
animal ordinance Monday that calls for pet 
owners to Iteep cats, as well as d(^, ontfi^. 
The ordinance has caused much debate in the 
past few wed(s betwem cat fanciers and 
members of the SPCA. 

The SPCA originally sought passage <rf the 
wdmance lo strengthen the {H-e5«it city code 
and iwwvide greater latrtectiw frwn abuse for 
area animate, as well » safety for non-pet 
ownors. But cat fancwrs objected saying that 
it i%jmp(M»ilde to confine a cat. 

IIARKY DAVIS TaiJ* the Council that the 
onJirance was "impracti<al, ' "cruel," and 
•'ridiculcHis." besittes being un«iforceable. 
Mr. I^vis. like others who have (dea(M before 
the Council, sirid ^ts were necessary in the 
rural areas <rf the city to control the ro(^t 
pc^NiiatkNi. 

"The rats and mice will be iriaying ring 
aroiuKMIw rosy if the cats have to be caged." 
said Mr. I^vis. He told the Council the only 
way to ^tfine a cat w» to put it in a cage. 



because unlike dp^ cats eaftnot be cmitained 
in a yard by a fence. 

Mr. Davis sauyhat even if the ordinance 
were passed and a member of the animal 
control p^-sonnel were to try to pick up a 
.stray cat he's not going to be "able to catch 
him. If he can catch a <at, he can run faster 
than I think most Virpnia Beach patrolmen 
can." 

AMKNDMEN'ra TO the ordinance were 
presented lo the Council Monday and Mr. 
Itavis loW them he wouW be in favor of the 
am«id^ version whrch deleted cats frwn 
clau%s calling for their confinement. The 
amendments would, however, allow a cat to 
be pidced up if it were a twisance » 

A sp^esman for the SPCA said that the 
ordinance, in its n-iginal version was the only 
way Ihe city wmdd have the authority to pick 
op stray and sick animals, as well as those 
which were a ninsance or had wrratched or 
bitten a person. Tl^ spokesman told the 
liai^cil that the sacUwi ol the ordinance 
cm^rini! animal m^pce would not be the 
Mnsv^er. since if a pmon com^ained abcxit 
an animal < cat w dog ) it would litve to first be 
)u(j^ a nttsance by ll» cowt before the 
animal could be {Mcked i^i. 



Owners claiming a cat or dog impounded for 
running al-large will be charged a fee of $10. 
plus $1 for the .second day the animal is im- 
pounded and $6 for each additional day. Dogs 
or cats unclaimed after more than five days 
and not placed in a suitable home will bt^ 
euthanized by Ihe SPCA. Owners who can be 
identified by a tag worn by the animal will be 
notified of their pet's impoundment. 

Till-: COlNCil/voted 6-4 in favor of the 
ordinaiKe in its wiginal form. Those In favor 
of Ihe law were Charles Oardner. Keid Ervin. 
John Baum. Robert Callis. Robert Cromwell 
and Ployd Waterfield. Tlw^e who voted 
apiasi Ihe ordinince were George FerreU. 
Dr. Clarence Holland. Garland Isdell and 
Murray Malbon. < Councilman Curtis Payne 
« as absent I 

Thi» ('ouncil indicated, however, that tl» 
ordinance wmild. I&e many laws, be enfwcrt 
selectively in the city and would probably not 
effect rural dwellers who ctepend on the vaH to 
take can* »rf rodents. The cats, in those cases, 
wwld not be stray since they wmild be m l\w 
owner's propi<rty 

Tlwortinance also providtes for (k^ ^mm 
fc<^, vaccinations and other requiremeWs tn 
slretftthen the ciarrent city code. 



^^gmt^mami 



m^ 



■■■ 




>Jiii4.^^fc AiKaC - 



OMMENT 



Page 2-Th0 Sun-Wednrnday, May 8^ 1974 



An edftorlak 



'Don't worry, dear. Thoy can't spoil OUR notghborhood/ 



Plans for schools 



J- Some interesting school 
t^evelc^ments have come to light 
•since March, when the Virginia 
■Beach School Board adopted its 
•Imposed operatiig budget for 1974- 
•?5. 

'.- Vir^nia Beadi residents have 
:'seen the emergence of a previously 
; unknown and quiet group, the 
; Virginia Beach Ekiucation 
■Association (VBEA). 
-: The VBEA, under the leadership 
'.pi Executive Director Richard 
; Gordon, former president of the 
rVirginia Education Association, 
■emerged as a vocal, authoritarian 
; group representing most of the city's 
• 2,600, teachers. 

'* The teachers took their case to 
; the people in an emotional campaign 
*lo rally support to their cause after 
•Biey rejected the School Board's 
;t)roposed average 7.7 per cent 
•increase in pay. 

^ The high-visibility tactics of the 
^VBEA seemed to pay off when 
^i^hool Superintendent Dr. E.E. 
:&rickell asked the School Board to 
Ibse an unexpected $515,000 in state 
•revenue to raise proposed teacher 
^jvages even more, to about 9.5 per 
^cent over last ye£U''s salaries. 

:* THE VBtA SEEMED satisfied 
*with the move at first, but now the 



ICItyside 



ByUndaHUIer 



teacl^rs plan to plead their ^ ause 
before the City Council Mond^ at 
* the first public hearing'^^n Uie city's 
proposed $93.3 million budget. 

In the midst of all the hoopla over 
teacher pay, another int^esting 
school development appeared. 
Mushrooming Virginia Beach may 
not need all that new school 
construction after all. 

The number of public school 
students is still growing, but the 
rate of increase is not as rapid as 
before. Instead of building more and 
more schools, the School Board was 
asked last week to look at the school 
population situation, evaluate 
alternatives to constnMzticHi and 
think about the future when our 
schools may be less crowded. 

Thip may come as a shock to 
parents and students who have 
coped. with new attendance zones, 
year-round education and split 
shifts. 

As the School Board pauses to 
evaluate its position and the VBEA 
pay battle begins to fade from the 
public eye, it might be wise for us to 
pause, too, and reflect on what it's 
all about. 

Every child in Virginia Beach 
deserves a quality education, and 
this is the goal we must keep in 
sight. 











Youths get look 
at city hall work 

Nineteen junior high and senior high School 
students got a taste of the goings-on at the Virginia 
Beach City Hall Monday. It was "Youth in 
povernment Djay" for members of the Mayor's , 
Youth CounciJ. '■ 

For th(we 19 students the day meant hob-nobbing 
with the city officials in the department of their 
choice, meeting artd eating lunch with, Vit^inia 
Beach City Council members and attending the 
informal and regular session of the Council. 
Students chose city departments to visit including 
animal control, the city attorney's office, the city 
engineer's office and the city manager's 
office, as well as the community services, parks 
and recreation, planning, police and social services 

departments. 

The Youth Council members even got a formal 
introduction by Mayor Robert Cromwell at the 
Council's regular session. Among the visitors was 
Bayside Junior High student Roger Scott. There 
wasn't a head that didn't turn to see blondish 
headed Roger stand wh«i his name was called. 
There was no resemblance or relation, however, 
between Roger (who had the beginning of a 
moustache and beard and chin-length hair) and 
Virginia Beach City Manager Roger Scott. And, 
Roger did not choee to spend government day in 
Mr. Scott's office. Instead, he witnessed the action 
in the city attorney's office. 



« : - 






^>: 



OTHER STUDENTS participating in the day's 
activities were Mary Anne DeFir (Bayside Junior 
High), Ronald Simpson (Kellam Hi^), Marsha 
Chenman (First Colonial High), James EUer 
(Princess Anne High), Bill James (First Q>lonial 
High), Bob Barry (KempsvUle High), Beth Katz 
(Kempsville Junior Hi^), Candice Petti^rew 
(KemjKville Junior High), Kathleen Schwartz 
(Kellam High), Leslie Marshall (Virginia Beach 
Junkwr High), Felicia Boyd (Kempsville High), 
John Rogers (Virginia Beach Junior High), Lynn 
Ashbacher (Bayside High), Peter Simmons (First 
Colonial High), Kim Furbee (Princess Anne High), 
R^k Rowland (Cox High), Bill Garrison (Bayside 
■P^) artWSitzi Keys (Plaza Junior High). 
While the Youth Council no doubt picked up a Ipt 
••• of information about their city government, 
t- Monday wasn't really a n^mal Council session. 
. - Councilman John Baum told the groiq) that it was a 
•: "light" agenda day and Mayor Cromwell added 
I* that nothing very controversial comes before the 
;• Council on the day prior to a Council election. 



*» * » ***** 



i*. CITY MANAGER Roger Scott, George Tinnes 
W (assistant to the city manager) and their wives 
''*, were in Reston last week for the annual meeting of 
* the Vii^lnia section of the Intemati<MUd City 
', [ Manager's Association. 




An Ind^^tdent Nmmptper 



WIBROCAR 



STAN MARTIN 



NEAL BRITTON SIMS 



tOmmA L£A OLOAKER 



MMES C. BfiOWM 



MaM«^ *'•■** > 



•EACH nWUtHINa OMKWATKM 

ait 



CAPITOL HILL MAIL 



Senator has a shoulder to cry on 



ByCILESINEX 
Sun Washington Bureuu 

WASHINGTON — Have you 
ever heard of a heartache in an 
envelope? Caseworkers for Sen. 
William Lloyd Scott (R-Va.) 
have, and dualing with them is 
their job 

Of the 2,000 letters Sen. Scott 
receives each week, many are 
from people in trouble. 

Mrs. Dorothy Hope, one of 
Sen. Scott's six caseworkers, 
recalls a PrinccWiHiam County 
World War 1 veteran whose 
Medicare benefits ran out as 
he lay stricken with cancer in 
the county hospital. 

The veteran used his mother's 
surname during his military 
service, Mrs. Hope said, so h^ 
veterans' benefits came in that 
name. At a later time, however, 
he changed to his father's 
surname after his father 
admitted paternity so that his 
son would have inheritance 
rights, she said. 

AFTER THE name change, 
the man no longer received 
veterans' benefits. Mrs. Hope 
said she called a congressional 
liaison for the Veterans 
Administration. As a result, 
the VA recently sent an 
ambulance to transfer the 
veteran to a VA hospital in 
Martinsburg, W.Va. 

Last week he was to have 
been placed in a nursing home, 
as tus original doctor suggested, 
with the VA picking up the tab 
for sue montlis. 

Not all cases have such 
satisfactory conclusions, 
according to Mrs. Hope. She 
said she is currently frustrated 
by her as yet unsuccessful 
attempts to reunite a man. 



stationed with the U.S. Army in 
Germany, and his wife, 
Klationed with the Navy in 
Washington, D.C. 

rhe Navy will not assign the 
woman to a German post, Mrs. 
Hope said. She said she hopes 
the man can be reassigned to 
Washington. 



"THERE ARE more 
heartaches than anything else 
(in casework)," Mrs. Hope 
said. "I get involved, especially 
when r meet the persoa" Often 
people involved in a case drop 
by the office, as was tbe case 
with' the lonely husband 
stationed in Germany. 

Casework — or problem 
solving — is generated by only 
part of the mail a senator 
receives. The remainder of the 
communications are comments 
on legislation, proposed 
legislation or how well a senator 
is dmng his job. 

In Sen. Scott's office "re- 
cently, n&fault insurance was 
the top issue in letters, 
according to Don Ruby, the 
senator's administrative 
assistant 

Mr. Ruby said almost all the 
mail on tUs subject came from 
law firms, and almost all were 
opposed to jroposed legislation. 

SECRETARIES WERE using 
window envelopes f <»• replies to 
these letters, Mr. Ruby said. 
They use window envelopes, 
which do not require the 
separate typing of an address, 
only when pressed by an 
unusual mail load. Standard 
envelopes are nicer and more 
personal, Mr. Ruby said. 

No-fault insurance recently 
outdistanced the usual biggest 
mail-getter in Sen. Scott's office 
— Social Security benefits, Mr. 
Ruby said. He said the office 
consistently receives letters 



questioning the $2,400 animal 
income limit on a person to 
qualify for rhaximuin Social 
Security benefits. 

The Social Security system 
also generates a lot of catdeviark 
in terms of people needing help 
in securing benefits. 

MR. RUBY SAID the 

second-biggest standard mail- 
getter is regarding black lung 
benefits. 

"We get lots (rf mail from 
people who worked i» a mine 
one or two years and want to 
know if they are eligible for 
benefits," he said. 

Campaign spending 
legislation was a major mail- 
getter recently, according to 
Mr. Ruby, with about half of 
the letter-writers for and 
half against 

Mr. Ruby and Sen. Scott are 
receiving "a scattering'" of 
mail about impeachment, most 
(rf which consists <rf petitions 
supporting the President, from 
conservative organizations. 

Representatives of church 
groups and other nonprofit 
organizati(His write often to the 
senator to express their concern 
that their contributiwis might 
be taxed. 

MR. RUBY estimated that 
about 10 per cent cf the mail 
Sen. Scott receives is 
"generated mail," or letters 
written by people at the urging 
and guidance of an organization 
to which they bdong. Some 
generated mail is 

unmistakable, suc^ as form 
letters. , 

"It is taken mwe seriously if 
it's generated from a broad 
spectrum ct pec^Ie," Mr. Ruby 
said. He added that there is 
nothir^ wrong with generated 
mail. 



"Every person has the right 
to write," he said. 

It is generally understood cm 
Capitol Hill that letters 
obviously generated by a 
pressure group are not taken as 
seriously as other letters. 

Mr. Ruby said Sen. Scott 
receives between five and JO 
craiA letters a week. Such a 
letter might say, "I hope you 
lose in the next election" or 
otherwise berate the senator 
without raising an issue that the 
office can answer. 

I^ .CONTRAST TO the crank 

letters are the sincere requests 
for help. 

"It is a great satisfaction 
when you've been contacted by 
some poor, old people on 
welfare," Mr. Ruby said, "and 
you find out the Social Security 
Administration has made a 
mistake, and you can call those 
people and say $3,000 is coming 
to them in a lump sum" 

One person opens all the 
office mail and parcels it out to 
the sue caseworkers by tc^ic as 
follows: 

• Social Security, black lung, 
transportation, Virginia 
affairs; 

• Federal employment. 
Treasury, Commerce and 
Labor Departments and the 
Postal Service; 

• Dq;>artments d Health, 
Education and Welfare; 
Housing and Urban 
Development; and all 
independent agencies, such as 
Environmen^l Protection 
Agency; 

• Public Works, Senate 
Interior and Insular Affairs 
Committee; 

• Veterans, U.S. Arrtiy Corps 
of Engineers, Agriculture 
Department; 

• Departments of State and 
Justice, presidential affairs. 




By 

'NeaX 
Sims 

Sun Editor 



Read sind weep: 
the transcrlpis 

Some thoughts on the tapes. 

The White House Won't be able to accuse the 
press of "vicious reporting" and "irresponsible 
journalism" on this story. Several large and rto-so- 
large newspapers across the country are printing 
the full text of the transcripts released April 30 by 
President Nixon. If Ron Zeigler finds any un- 
founded attacks or accusations in their paged, it 
was his boss that made them, not the press. 



<^ *******A 



IN AN APRIL 14 morning meeting between the 
President, H.R. Haldeman and John Ehrlichnian, 
Mr. Nixon s'trangely showed a concern for 
the legality of tising a taped telepiione conversation 
for his own purposes. 

Mr. Nixon — Can you use the tape? 

Mr. Ehrlichmah - Well no. You can use Higby. 

Mr. Nixon — Why not? 

Mr. Ehrlichman — Well, it's illegal. 

Mr. Haldeman — No, it's not. It is not. 

Mr. Nixon — Dori't you have to tell somebody? 

Mr. Ehrlichman — Put a beeper. 

Mr. Haldeman — There is no beeper required 
Check the WasWngtoii law. 

Mr. Nixon — Yeah. 

Mr. Haldeman — District of Columbia is under 
federal law, and the federal law does not require 
disclosure to the other party of the recording of 
phone conversations. The (rfione call was made to 
Magruder's lawyer's office which is also in the 

District of Columbia, and there is no law requiring 
disclosure 

Mr. Nixon — Well, anyway. 

Mr. Haldeman — it cannbt be admissible, but it's 
legal. 

Mr. Nixon — That's interesting. That's a new one. 



ANYONE WHO COMMENTS that he's made a 



judgment after "first reading" of the transcripts is 
more than likely over-stating his case — or at least 
his reading capability. At a better-than-average 
reading rate of 400 words per minute, it would take 
more than eight non-stop hours of reading to 
complete the entire transcripts. ., 

THE TRANSCRIPTS might provide an en- 
terprising supermarket chain with the opportunity 
to entice new customers and provi^ a service for 
their shoppers. Instead of the usual plates, saucers 
and encyclopedias, supermarkets couia oner the 
entire 50-volume set of transcripts as presented by 
the President to Congress. 

With a purchase of only $5, the firat volume is 
yours for only 49 cents. Once you've started this 
eye-opening experience, you're hooked, so each 
subsequent volume costs $1,49. You'll own an entire 
set, purchased one a week, in less than a yeaf . 

Each volume is beautifully bound in black leather 
and bears the gold-embossed inscription: "Sub- 
mission of Recorded Presidential Conversations to 
the Committee of the Judiciary of the House of 
Representatives. By President Richard M. Nixon." 



THE MUDICIARY COMMITTEE is, of course, 
not satisfied with the transcripts and wants these 
tapes and more besides. The transcripts do not— as 
Mr. Nixon said they would — establish his in- 
nocence "once and for all." They say nothing of 
ITT and campaign contributions by milk producers. 

As a matter of opinion, the Nixon administration 
has fed us so much (expletive deleted), that if the 
full truth ever emerges. Confess would do well to 
throw the (characterization deleted) out. 



Forum 



liiias. 



■#f 




•nfing 



Letters from 
our readers 

Ifs, ends, and bumps 

Sir: 

If I coiiki be in chaife d aa d^'s r^Mls I 
wouM: 

1. Repaint tl» confusing pavement 
markings at London Bridge, at tte 
i^0MCti«i <rf Great Neck R«id and Firat 
CotoMal Road, and on w^tbowKl Sba% Drive 
near Atlantic Av«iue. 

2. Place yeiki s^is on all "unmaited" 
ii^nectioa. 



^^e, 3. Hang signs infornfing Pacific Avenue 
traffic that they have advance and delayed 
green at Laskin Road where the situation 
raists but is unlabeled (it is <mly labeled for 
the Laskin Road traffic). 

4. Issue to all new licensees a booklet that 
details Uie feeder road regulations and 
includes a map ^S^Wg all our main roads 
and their speed limits pha a list of hazardous 
[daces. Perhaps the license test coukl include 
questions on this matoial. 

5. Rebuild the bridge on Potter Rdad. In the 
meanwhile, put a huge green sign above it 
limiting it to one car at a time and five miles 
per hair. 

6. Where Potter Read and First Colonial 
Road meet, cut down the island and route 
traffic leaving Potter Road to Uie right d the 
reduced ami reshaped island. 

7. At the Grwit Ne<* Road brieve just north 
of Wolfsnare Road place sipis saying, 
"Dangerous Bump", "Watch for cars turning 
Mi" and, "Bridge speed: 10 mph." 

8. Eloi^te the Mi turn lane on souUibound 
First Cdonial Road just north of Laskin 
Road. 



f^^rUch refored to Douglas W. Talbot and his 
business dealings with city (^ficials. These 
articles identified Mr. Talbot as a member of 
Talbot Wermers & Associates, a local 
engineering firm. 

While I assume no particular mwal posture 
regarding Mr. Talbot's busines relationships, 
I would appreciate your setting the reco^ 
sb-aight with r^ard to the name of Mr. 
Talbot's firm. Effective Jan. 1, 1974 Uie name 
was changed to Talbot & Associated, Ltd., 
when I dissociated myself from all business 
affiliations with Mr. Talbot and established 
the firm of Consultant Engineering Services, 
Inc. 



Lyie G. Wermers 



'Supercilious' 



Hairy Jeavou 



Nama change 



Sk: 



I^oii^ UK put several weda there have 
bum wwEil artiete to yav UBWijapa- 



Sir: 

Virgioia Beich School ^perintendent Dr. 
E.E. Bridtell's recent (flselosure that Oie 
Virgima Beadi 8cho<4 system has no valid 
new {riant coatructhm reo^remait for 
proper uti&alion cf the funding establtehed 
l^ the vic^Msly coidncted rrferesidum 
can^gn cwivinces the astute observer ttiat 
tte attaniuBtrative staff of t!« sdiod system 
B eitho- woeMly ineffidait or willfully 

What to te l^al states of Dr. BridcdTt 
|dan to expend ftinds allocated to mw |tent 
coHtoucthn (not to include mrinmi^E peoii. 



gymnasiums, tennis courts, ete.) for not yet 
defined plant improvonent projects? Will the 
ranq>ant victors m the referendum war share 
the booty,,as in ttie old days of honest piracy, 
in the forin of staff salary increases, even 
more administrative staff feaUterbedding, 
and furtter eidiancem«it cf Qie recreational 
fadlifles? * 

What ha^iens when the same staff 
announces an<rther new plant requirement, 
and the allooated funds have dissolved and 
disappeared ftito vari(He frivolous projects? 
Do we have' dnotiier bitter, hoQy contested 
rderendum for a new boml issue— (»- perhaps 
t^ that time, our very efftoimit ami concerned 
(for Uiemselves) City Council will have 
arranged l« tbe total eliminaUtm (rf tite 
uBwieUy constraints of the referendum? The 
typical City Council seen^ to share with the 
very eiqiert and irirfessionBt educational 
staff as sap«%lUoin disregard lot taxpayos 
and parrals. 

Tl^ astute and "hopeful (4»erver would 
I»t)gnc6ticate a day of redconii^ in the offing 
ia this great two-headed albatron— the City 
Council atKi the educational minunistntton. 



H.E.McCall«in 



The Sun wekomet at ktttn /om tt* read-, 
en. Namef vM be wiMiM tm ropiest, but 
pieae ttebide your nanr^ti Meptmu mim-: 
hw wUk your ktttf. Ltttvt u* mbfeet tt> 
mUtmg to meet new^t^^o' $t^ md tpxe iv- 
^tirmimm. WMU: Fanm. Vt^Ot BemA Sun, 
138 Rgmtnimt M^ Vl^^^^mh Vm. 23451, 



l^^mg 



■HH 



H!lil.» »»»liPP™^»"li»l'ipi.-J»-^^'^W 



i\> 



sQ** 



«> 



HASSLES 




Lay-away is 
never forever 

Last week, I received a haH>y little notice in the 
maU from a department store which shall remain 
nameless. 

It started off cheerily: 

"Dear Ctstomer, May we hear from you about 
your lay-away purchase in order that we may know 
how best to serve you? Lay-away period will expire 
on May 1. Please call for the merchandise on or 
before that date." 

Since I received the notice on May 1, I called 
immediately and told them how they could best 
serve me, since they asked. The best way they 
could serve me, I told them, was to leave my lay- 
away iwrchase exactly where it was and quit 
bugging me about it. 

I'VE BEEN MAKING payments slowly but 
surely since winter on an air conditioner that I got 
for a mere pittance since I bought it on a 
night when it was 34 degrees. 

(I took the advice of a friend who sagely said one 
shmild buy air condition«:« in the winter because 
they always go up in price come sunmier. The 
friend also informed me I cotdd put it in lay-away, 
pay a little per montb, save any interest charges, 
and have the thing paid for by summer.) 

Ah, you ask. So what's the gripe? The gripe is that 
nobody told me I had to have the thing out by May 1. 
The salesperson neglected to point out this little 
ctetail. 

IN MY IGNORANC^. I assumed that all huge 
chain department stores, being in fierce 
competiti(m with each other, would have the same 
lay-away pdlicies. I was wrong. 

I based my false assumption on Qie policies of 
anottier department store where I once purchased, 
of all things, a diamraid. That department store 
told me I could keep my diamond in lay-away 
forever as long as I continued to make some kind of 
monthly payments. 

But back to the saga of the air coiKiitioner--and 
that's bad. 



I NAIVELY CALLED and asked for help. I spoke 
to a woman who was most courteous. She took my 
name and lay-away number, then asked me to hang 
on. 

So I hung on...and (Mi...and on.. .and on. I 
oitertained myself listening to ttie random clicks 
and buzzes on the phone line. And hung on some 
more. 

I started dinner while hanging on. (My phone has 

a cmivenient 15-foot cord, allowii^ me to ramble 

around in the kitchen vMLe hanging on.) I hung on 

some more. 

' I washed a few dishes, and hung on some more. 

At last, a voice came on the wire. "Hello, Mary?" 
it said, then clicked of f before I could shout "Help! " 
Then I was disconnected. 

I CALLED BACK, got the right department and 
another voice. "What was it in reference to?" th« 
voice asked sweetly. So I went throu^ the song and 
dance all over again— about the notice in the mail 
and the paymmts and ttie lay-away {dan and the 34- 
d^ree n^t when I visited the store and <» and on. 

But I don't fliink ttie voice on the other end 
understood because we had to pause between every 
othor soitence while the jets from Oceana- 
ttiundered overiiead. 

"I live in Virginia Beaeh and the Navy jets are 
flyiitf ," I informed the voice. 

"CAi," it said, sounding as if it thought I should 
be put away somewho-e. "WeU, hang on." 

I HUNG ON some more. And more...and more... 
and more... 

More clicks and buzzes on the phone Une. Dinner 
was finished by Ghenaiull was still bangmg on. , 

Anothra- voice came on the line. "Hello," what is 
this in reference to?" 

"You're kidding," I replied wittily. "Do I hav6 to 
go tivough the whole thing agaui?" 

I did. 

At the end, it was decided by the credit manager 
that the store would hold my air conditioner for two 
m(re we^s. Thea I m^ ^ttwr have 1e 09^ a 
charge aco)unt to charge % Jwlance, pay tl« 
balance in cash or tose gay air conditioner but get 
my namey back. 

I came up with some other Isolutions. Like sending 
them a bwnb in my lay-away i«yment aivel(^. Or 
inf^EnUng my air conditioner in thdr office uid 
fre^ng them all to death. 

I still dm't know vtliat I'm going to do. But I now 
itnilayiy^thnt lay-away is never forever. ^^ 



Th« Sun-Wednesday. May 8, 197 A-P^ 3 



face/ 



by Rod HonA 




The kitten may seem undecided how it feels 
about moving to a new home, but Louise 
Hoyt is sure her new furry friend will be hap- 
py. Ms. Hoy t's feline companion was adopted 



from the Virginia Beach SPCA, which has 
plenty of cats and dogs looking for good 
homes and friendly owners. 




^ COMER 

PVLE 



"<^ 






'!mm&$sssisms$mfm 



'UN-BARE-ABLE' 



I 



I 



Laughing streak struck 



The courtroom audience collapsed into laughter, 
ami two members of the audience, unable to 
restrain themselves, were cited for contempt of 
court when General District Court Judge C.A. 
Spanmilis presided over a "streaking" trial May 1. 

Two women and six men were convicted of in- 
decent exposuref The judge disagreed with the 
defense attorney's plea that the April Fool's Day 
incident was oiUy a prank. 

The eight were arrested about 11 p.m. April 1 
behind the Zodiac restuarant near 23rd Street and 
Atlantic Avenue. They pled not guilty through their 
attorney Stanley E. Sacks. 



OFFICER D.F. KERR testified that he saw the 
group strip behind the restaurant and run down 
23rd Street toward Atlantic Avenue, then turn 
around when they saw a police car. He was working 
in plain clothes on special assignment out of the 
Second Police Precinct. 

As the groiq) neared the offlco-, he began run- 
ning with them and apirehended Charles L. Lar- 
son, 2&, of 24th Street. 

The audience chudcled at the officer's statement 
that Mr. Larson was wearing only a scarf which did 
not conceal him. 

Mr. Sacks asked the officer whether he 
recognized anyone else in the group. Officer Kerr 
sent the audience into laughter when he replied he 
was unable to say who the 14 to 16 people in the 
group were because he was running with the grmip. 
He said several of them ran to a van parked behind 
the Zodiac. 

WHEN HE ARRIVED at the van with Mr. 



I.arson, Officer Kerr said he saw two women and 
four other men inside the van putting their clothes 
on. He said he also saw Williams W. Carr, 43, of 
Patton Lane, sitting in the front of the van wearing 
only a tee-shirt. 

The others were identified -as Deborah L. 
Garrison, 19. Prosperity Road, Linda A. Beasley, 
22, Whitman Lane, Robert D. Webber, 26, S. Jef- 
ferson Street, Tyrone A. Foy, 24, Pleasant Avenue, 
Norfolk, and Benjamin F. Herndon, 29, Martin 
Avenue. 

Courtroom spectators laughed at Mr. Larson's 
response to questions about how he was wearing the 
scarf. ^ 

"Were you covered?" his attorney asked. 

"Well, it's a big scarf," Mr. Larson replied, 
holding the scarf up for display. 

As the clerk called for order, two members of 
the audience were cited for contempt of court when 
they couldn't stop laughii^. 

JUDGE SPANOULIS fwjnd each of the defen- 
dants ^ilty, giving fines of $100 each and court 
costs plus 10 days' suspended jail sentences. The 
jail time was suspended on condition of payment of 
fines and costs within 30 days. 

The streakers raised $111 outside the courtroom 
by taking up a Collection among themselves. They 
gave the court the money as down payment on the 
total fines and court costs. 

As officer Kerr left the building, one of the 
streakers shodc his hand and said, "There's no 
hard feelings. That's just the way it goes. It's a 
universal thing." 



Budget batUe moves to Council 



Moiday is showdown time for 
the Virginia Beach Education 
Association (VBEA) in its 
battle for higher teacher 
salaries. 

On Monday, the VBEA wiU 
ask the City Council to increase 
the 1974-75 Schod Board budget 
by $920,151 to provide additional 
6inds for teacher raises. 

The City Council will hold a 
public hearing on the proposed 
city (grating budget for 1974-75 
Monday at 2 p.m. in City 
CouncQ diambers. The city 
budf^t must be approved by 
June 1. 

In a letter sent to the city 
manager and all city 
councihnen last week, VBEA 
President Wittiani P. Knq>p 
said that the VBEA Faculty 
Representative Assembly 
unanimously adopted a 
resdution at a special meetli^ 
i^ 19 askini for the salary 
increase. 






THE VBEA WILL a^ for a 10 

cent ao-oss the board 



increaseovertfaecurroit: scale, 
the letter states. A b^inning 
teacher would receive $8,140 
taida- the VBEA proposal. A 
freshman teacher would 
receive $7,850 in the school 
budget to be considered 
Monday. 

The Sdiod Board approved 
an across the board average 
raise of 7.7 per cent for te^iphers 
in the 1974-75 budget approved 
in March. The VBEA had 
originally requested raises 
averagiig 20 per cent and 
rejected the raise. 

The School Board then voted 
in early April to use an 
additional $515,000 in 
unexpect^ state revenies Co 
raise teacher salaries even 
npore, to an average dt 9.5 per 
cent 

However, the VBEA contends 
diat the percentage of increases 
are misleading since they 
include normal incremoit jpay 
raises most teachert^^eceive for 
Oich year's additional 
experience. 



THE VBEA's proposal to 
include the additional $920,151 
in the school budget would raise 
salaries 10 per cent excluding 
increment raises. 

The VBEA in early Ai»41 
indicated it would not adt the 
City Council to send the School 
Board's budget bacic to the 
board for further study. It 
decided instead to give the 
council a position statement on 
die salary dispute after the 9.S 
per cent raise was approved. 



"The entire issue of salary 
revolves round one thing — 
inflation," Mr. Krupp said in 
the letter. He said he had 
included information that 
"substantiates the impact of 
iitflation that Virginia Beach 
teachers have felt 

dramatically." 

The City Council can increne 
the schools' operating budget 
but does not have the legal 
authority to change specific 
items. 



Army asks women to 'take a break' 



The Artay Iteswve wanU 
young Vtargiria Be«;h women to 
"Take a Bredt" \iy «ltoting in 
the ResCTves. 

The Army Reserve has a 
special offer for female Wgh 
sdiool graduates, ages U to 34, 
caDed the "Take a Break" 
option. The (qition to designed to 
thiHrtfln the combative tiiM 
woimn are reijiired to sp«id 
away ftom home 00 active duty, 
said LL Cd. Otto Nauman, 
br^ade ^nuModo-. 

Cd. NMunan exfdained Oat 
women in the Army reserves 
prevto^ went (Brectly from 
basic tndning in Alabama to 
advanced training at some 
oOct Ar^ laatallBtioa. 

The *TAe a Break" oi$»im 
allowt y«ing women t© 

tevc ttaBe«ff balore starti^ the 
■ irfArmytrattH. 



woman who will graihiate from 
high sdiod or college this 
spri^ couM sign up with a local 
Army reserve unit after dte 
received her high school 
diptoma or college degree, CoL 
Nauman explaiMd. 

Aft»- graduation, she wouM 
go to Foi McCteOan, Ate., for 
sevoi werin of bask traiiring 
thto susuno'. 

Once basic training Is 
Miaqtl^ed, dw yooBi woman 
has np to OM 3raar to start her 
advaarad iadivttial tniiii«. 

In 0» iirterim, she could 
return to her bwoe and dvilian 
Uf^ g^ a dviUaa job or r^um 
to achooL SiB woold be reipita^ 
tofcttMd unit mee^m, omaQr 
OB iradienk, for IC toon per 
moDttiduftag tte period. 



mcmd) white they receive basic 
and advanced training, he said. 
In adifiUoQ. they may be paid up 
to $1,000 per year for tte 16 
hours per m<mth of traimng 
wltti a kical laiit 



Virginia Beach women 
interested in more information 
about the Army Rraerves are 
ariced to vtoit or call the Army 
Re^ve Center at Ft. Story 
(428-1111, ext. 2331). 




A YOUNG 1«r^* BmA are prii 



TOP SALESMAN 

APRIL 1974 

CLELLE QUINLIVAN IS ONE OF 
THE REAL PROS AT STOHL 
REALTY -SHE SPECIALIZES 
IN RESIOENTIAL PROPERH 
CAU HER TO SEU YOURS 

OFFICE 497-4861 HOME 497^48 

STOHL REALTY 



How tosnbscrllie 




4eOVii#iiil«iblM.«l 



Many of our raaiton prafar to gat 
thair panonal copiw of The Sun by 

"«*•• .^ 

If you with Tha Sun to ba maiM 
woMy to your honw or busine», mail 
us lh* Mupon and Mrvtoa will ba|^n 
knnMdiataly. 

Mail To: 

Virginia Beach Sun 

Circulation Dept. 

IStRMomontRd. 

Virginia BeKh. Va. 23452 



inaawMailThaSunTo: 




I 



I 



Name 



I Addraai 



I 



City Stata t^ 

1Yr.|§C) S»lofc$4.»t) 3Moa.«.a 



i)\ 



THE 



BOLD ONES 



i\ 




weekdays 11 PfA 



HPPI 



eatures 



Page 4-The Sun-Wedneiclay, May 8, 1d74 



Looking back at 
streaking in 2974 




streaking by now has been so thoroughly 
analyzed by sociologists, psychologists, 
journalists, academicians, politicians, ac- 
tivists, and just about everyQne witti 
something to gain from getting his-her name 
in print that one fears there is nothing left to 
say on the subject. However, we have yet to 
cmsider how the phenomenon of streaking 
will be viewed by posterityr 

The following scenario is this writer's idea 
of how two archeologists conducting a "dig" 
in New Yoi* Qty a thousand years from now 
might see the subject. They have just come 
across a pile of 1974 newpapers that have 
somehow been preserved intact by the air- 
tight covering of a plastic garbage bag. 

COBOL 39: Fortran, lookl A major find! In 
the eighth decade (rf the twentieth century 
homo sapiens suddenly discarded his highly 
formalized clothing and began running 
around stark naked. 

Fortran 94: No, Coby. If you read the text, 
you'll find that those are just photc^aphs of 
streakers. 

C : I'm afraid I can't decipher much. I never 
got around to taking Anciente Americaine. 

F: Streaking at that time was a primitive 
puberty rite young males were forced to 
undergo before they could be accepted into the 



adult male community aiMi tiws acquire jdbs 
and females. The ^Hing men had to run nfdied 
through a publte place Routing "streak, 
streak" while newspaper and television 
cameramen chased them. Those «^ couldn't 
run fast enough are the ones w^ose pictures 
you see. 

C: YUK, how barbaric. 

F: Take it easy, Coby. Remember, this 
was only 30 years afto* they dropped the 
bomb. 

C: But how can you be so sure about the 
reason for streaking? 

F: The famed anthn^wlogist, Dr. Martin 
Mean, in his brilliant book "Coming of Age in 
America," points out how streaking follows 
the typical pattern of all primitive rites. Note 
the unique ceremonial dress: in this case 
special footwear, headgear and peimants. 

C: But, Fort. How c<Hne women didn't 
streak? 

F: That has been a subject of some debate. 
Some scholars say female fashions have 
always been a form ot streaking. However, 
most authorities now link the male monthly 
on streaking to ttie emergence of the Women's 
Liberation movement. 

C: You mean wotanen made men streak? 

- F: NO, NO, Men made men streak because 



of Wmnen's Lib. You recall the work^ (rf I^. 
Sigmund Fraud — ym studied him In 20th 
Coitury Mytholi^ — well, he had th«i theory 
of genius envy. ... 

C: Genius? That meant male creative 
power in primitive Latin. 

F: lUght. Well, according to Fraud's 
theory aU women were neurotic because they 
weren't as intelligent or creative as men. ... 

(Cobol breaks into a flt of uncontrollable 
giggling.) 

F: Coby, get hold oi yourself. 

D: I know, I know. This was only SO years 
after women got the vote. 

F: WeU, as I was saying, the general 
consensus of scholarly, o^ion is that Dr. 
Fraud's followers introduced the rite of 
streaking in order to per{)etuate the myth of 
genius envy. If was a last ditch attenq^ to 
prove that men are siq;>erior to women. 

C: What hai^iened? 

F : Nothing. Men finally^put ^eir clothes on 
and accepted womoi as equals. 

C: Say, I've got to run (»■ I'll miss the 6:30 
rocket to Tokyq, My husband gets furious 
when he has to Iraep dinner waiting. 

F: Mine, too. And we've got dinner guests 
from the University of Venus. 

C: See you tomorrow. Fort. Don't forget, 
say hello to the little man for me. 



"iii»^i"iiiBi 



IIOROS 




for 

Mays 

to May 14 



i|IUE9: (March nt« April 
»— Ah> Ariw Aiwif ) - 
Itae your yrteUactaal Aarp- 
OBM to ttie MlMt degree. 
Aveld pracrMttaatiQa - do it 
now. Be e^wdaHy Und and 
ooBilderate d yov ante. 
Rise alMve petty aBoeyaacee 
is die relattouliip. 

TAURUS: (AfcflMleMijr 
» - Ako Itana ilaceBiBat) 
— Plu all career matters 
carrfully, siKh as con- 
flBTNicee, i^ppelatinento, etc. 
-dent iiy load lib. Thought- 
(kil preparatiea wlD pqr off. 
MEbclHiifaieae vitti pteaaure at 
eedalevNits. Raneir friand- 



GSMINI: (Magr n le Jaac 
II ~ Alee GooW AeccBdaat) 

- dear the dedti of eld iiro}- 
ecta. matters kft haagiag 
lire. Energy if hl^ 80 let (dd 
matters cleaaed iq> now. Use 
ymir imagtaiation to add 
originBlity to a previoiia con- 
cept. FViante help in devdop- 
ing new ideas. 

CANCER: (Jue n to Joljr 
a — Abo Caaeer AsecMlaBt) 

— Use this period to make 
plans Ik the futore. Accent 
kglral na^reia mettiods. Be 
introspective and the amwers 



wiDeometo jwL Viatts to i4d( 
friends a poaiiUity. Use care 
in aignfaig eootradi now. 

L£0: (Jily B to AWMt 12 
-Alee Leo A iiMdaan -yCfc- 
reer inattan do»doim to a 
nwre routine and steady pace. 
Good tinw to start a stif^po- 
proveoMBt sMjr propam. U 
a vacation la poadUa now is a 
^Md ttane to take it Moid 
torn relattanaMpe witti con- 
iideration. 

vmaO:(ABg.B to Septs 

- Aiao Viigo AeecadaM) - 
Don't be depreaeed.over a 
tenaporary finaaelal setbadi 

- it wID woit out aU right in 
the )aB% run. Ddays in vaca- 
tion plaiie couU work (nit for 
the best. Resiat com|daining, 
attttudea at work - accept re- 
qnnaibility. 

lJBtA:(8cptntoOel.B 

- Aiao Libra Aseeadaal) - 
Resist being indecisive - 
oomndt yoursdf , one way or 
MMttier or the dioioe oouM be 
wiOidrawn. try to use your 
kgic in emcrtiflnal matters. 
You are apt to ba ooitfuaed 
mentally, so concentrate 
whendriiing. 

SCORPIO: (Get B to Nov. 
n - Abo Seorpio Aseeadaat) 

- Try to deao up matters 
from the past - old brcriien 
friendsh^ tabe ideas, etc. 
Get profesiional advice re- 
ganUng tax and l^acy mat- 
ters involving partnershipB. 
C^ up to new phikaoiMes 
and ideas. 



SMiITrA»l»: KNet . B to 
pei^ll r- Abo SatfMfftiB As- 
oeadaM) -^ For bert remits 
tivn yov energies to hard 
woriE now. Itap kgk to the 
fwegnNBid ntfher tbaa «no- 
tional^ai^, Iteep reiatton- 
d^ ^ mate hannonious, 
iMMne affafrs ruradng smqottt- 
ly. FinuKee^proaper. 



■-^' 



CAPRICORN: (PM' » to 
jaiL II - Abb CapMoirs Ai- 
coidait) — Work on ideas 
Qiat «e moreeMdeot, pro- 
1^ service uid save time. 
Good time to hnpnve your 
dtills through addiUonal 
rtudy counes. Meditate on a 
bri^t Uba to cMne up with 
woriubbpbns. 



AQUARRS: (JSS. » to 
retkli-AboAaMriaeAs- 

eoidHt) - Now b the time 
to apply yoir creattve Idna — 
not just Uiiidc about then. An 
emotknd assodatleB oouU 
end now with a tenaporary 
feeling of loos. CMisider care- 
b^ before panting a favor 
to famQy mnnber. 



PISCES: (Feb. U to Mardi 
N - Abo Plocee Aa t ae d a nt ) 
— You could reach affree- 
mento now that would r^iair a 
broken rdatkHiriiip. Accent b 
on home and partners. B buy- 
ii« property look for Ihe Ifanr- 
uH>er ttiat you can r^uHArii. 
Romance b favored, too. 



leieibtr 



^ 






erbertHarre 



FLORIST 

l^ CALL 428-8732 

1041 LASKIN RD. 



Champion stands out in a crowd 





GIVE HER 
A 
TRULY UNIQUE 
GIFTI 

We can make a useful and 
decorative lamp out of her favorite 

'vase, figurine or trophy. 

The Perfect Gift for Mother's Day! 



VA. BEACH NORFOLK 

[4724 VA. BEACH BLVD. 3901 COLLEY AVE 

■croM from mw J.M. FMds 

MON.4AT. t:Se • %:M ■ CORNER 40III « COLUCY AVCl 

FRI.tNeP.M. MOH^AT. OiM-fcaO 



Some years ago veteran 
chess raconteur Irving Cho*- 
nev described a mob scene at 
a club when the guest at honor 
was the then reigning wwld 
champion, the flamboyant 
Jose Capablanca of Cuba — 
the chess world's contribution 
to the l^end of the 1920s. 

A youngster in the crowd 
who had never seoi the cham- 
pion asiced Cheniev to point 
him out vrtien he came into ttie 
room. 

"I won't have to." replied 
Chemev. "When Capablanca 
comes in. you'U Imow he's the 
chan^)." 

A chanqAon b » chanq>ion 
for good reason. Even in de- 
feat hiirtory's moat famous 
chess amateur, Napoleon 
Bonaparte, possened an in- 
timidating presence. In hb di- 
ary. "Takii^ Napoleon to St. 
Helena." John R. Glover, who 
accompanied Bonaparte, 
noted the Corsican's tedi- 
nique in a game against Gen. 
Monthdon. 

"He (Napdeon) appeared 
to play but badly, and certain- 
ly very much inferior to hb 
antagomst. who nevertheless 




GuttavStoUi 

(Sweden) 

FRENCH DEFENffi: 



with Joseph Brovim 



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was determined not to win the 
game from his ex-majesty." 
Perhaps because chess is 
cerebral, a champion is often ^ 
brilliant in discussing the 
game as well as playing it No 

one explained what chess is 
aU about better than ex- 
diampion Enumuel Lasko- 
when he wrote that, "On the 
diessboard lies and hypocrisy 
do not survive long. Tlie cre- 
ative conbination lays bare 
the presumption of a lie; the 
merdless fact, culminating in 
a dieckmate, contradicts the 
iypocrite." 

Nothing too is as electric as 
a cortflict ot wills between two 
chttnpions — espedally if of 
the opposite sex. At the 1970 
(Kympiad in Siegen, Ger- 
many, the big entertainment 
was guessing whose personal- 
ity would emerge triumphant 
in the dash between Bobby 
Fischer and the attrM:tive 
BrazUian women's champion, 
Ruth Cardoso. 

Twice they passed eadi oth- 
er in a corridor. Apparently 
aware of Fischer's allergy to 
strangers. Miss Cardoso 
pursed her lips, raised her 
nose and walked by him as if 
Bobby was swinuning in in- 
visible iidi. 

The third time it happoied, 
the startled Brazilian beauty 
was brought to a halt by 
Fischer's tall presence. "I 
like you!" he told her abrupt- 
ly. "You're a quiet povon!" 
— and hurried away before 
she could get her breaOi bade. 

A half century ago a good 
night's sleep was consiitered 
die best kuid of training for a 
champicn^p match. To ttiis 
tteory were grafted supple- 
mental ideas from dianwtri- 
cally opposite poles. One 
preached the Mcessity to re- 
ttan bimt-up mental energy 
widi vigorous physical exer- 
cise. (Fischer and Boris 
Spassky are today's dii|a- 
ples.) BA amtber groi^) be- 



NOTICE 

Tb« Azalea Festival anded lart week. Queen 
Tomrelli, her ettendaim and festival offlc- 
Ws rode in 20 of our new Oinrdera and 
n^nouths. Every one of these beautiful 
can we ikmv on sato at tremendous dis- 
oounts. Ths is a rare onwrtunity to save, 
while tiwy 1st. But hurry. Sevei^ of thwn 
time alrMdy been ^lokeif for. -^ 



DI\rfslon Ptoquoson Motors 




M.Ufc7see 



CHRYSLtK 



Plymoutfi 



POMOCO 



iMMIftW. 



mm «ti^ti 



EMERALDS 

THAT EVEN THE WORKING 

MAN CAN AFFORD! 
-The Gift of Love For Mother 
from 

Gem Specialties 

A very unusual jewelry store. We In^te 
you to come in and Me our unusual jew- 
elry and gemstone items. IF WE DON'T 
HAVE WHAT YOU WANT, WE'LL 
MAKE IT FOR YOU. 



V\te offer the followir^ at unheard of low 

prices: 

LAMES RINGS-GB^IUINE GOeTONE S4. up 

X^i/ NAIinULGQfSTONE BEADS STJS 
' CARVED (mVXlTEIBSl. up 



'6 



nam 
cu»n> 

MONDAYS 




3320 VA. BEM» BLVD. 



lieved that musde-stretching 
was less he^ful than seden- 
tary relaxatiwi. 



ITiese theories were teAecT 
in one Scandinavian chess 
championship. Finland's 
Gunnar Book walked 15 miles 
every day. His opponeirt was 
Gustav Stoltz of Sweden 
(whose game, below, against 
Rudolf Spielniann was a das- 
sic of sacrificial chess). 
Stoltz's favorite trainbig rou- 
tine was to sit with friendb in a 
hotd lobby drinking Khnapps 
until well after midnight Bod) 
men slept well, and tong. 



llie match ended in a draw. 

STOCKHOLM -1131 

Rudolf ^idmana 
(Gennany) 



1. 
2, 
3, 
4 
5 
6 
7. 
8 
9 

10, 
11, 
12. 
13. 
14. 
U 
16 
17 
18 
18 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27, 
28, 
29, 



P-K4 

P-Q4 
.N-Q2 

P4C5 

B4» 

P-QB3 

N-K2 

N-B3 

PxP 

K-Bl 

N-B4 

NxP(K6) 

B-KB4 

B-S7 

^xPdi 

BxQ 
.P-KN3 
.K-Nl 

B-B7 

B-KS 

PxN 

Q-N3 

B-B5 

QxPch 

QxR 

P-KR4 

K-Bl 

P-RSch 

Resips 



P-K3 

P^ 

KN-B3 

KN-Q2 

P-QB4 

N<^B3 

Q^ 

PxP 

B-NSch 

P-B3 

PxP 

P-K5 

PxN 

N-B3 

K-B2 

B-N5 

B-R6Gh 

KxN 

KR-Kl 

NxB 

RxP 

B^]B4 

BxB 

K-N3 

R-K7 

BxPdl 

frQ6 

K-N4 



ACROSS 



1. Timber trM 
4. Fact oft 
(•■■I 

1. Statfar* 
It. "Harden in 

the — 

Mwcw" 
IS. Spirit lamp 
U. Seaaairl* 
It. Sinn dvtUiiiK 
IT. Qvoto 
IS. CaDtRt daner 
19. Prti aar 
n. ViMmMliiihcd 
2S. Aitariik 
24. tfaminir 
a. Werk (toppaat 
». Corrod* 
Sn. SHuhtdfcm 
31. C4miptl( 
82. Gat— ,ha»« 



i. AU^firl 
affair: t wdi. 

4. Evil apirit 

5. l«dnr tntry 
•. Ma. Laadan 
7. Praadanof 

actioB 
a. Albon 
9. Ribamia 

10. Poker lUkt 

11. Lewd look 
16. Uke,titaof 

Porrjr rietorjr 
to. Appraiai 
tl. Eiitrtatjr 
2S. Uwmr'i ' 

trsBiactiMi 
U. Vm in eoaiaioi 
n. Gaardianof 

tbeaoek 



U. 



V. 

n. 

so. 

IS. 



S4. 

St. 

ST. 

ss. 
a*. 

40. 
4S. 
44. 

4t. 



Makea 

gricTou error 

in your ehaek- 

infaecooBt 

Tahtraa 

Raviiranant 

Worn out 

WhMi people 

•aagioap: 

twda. 

Ubrcttiat, 



Walhadilo»ly 
Narrownoteh 
Saa:Utia 
■crAapad 



Baaitaalad 
Waddbw vow: 
twda. 
Study 



M. RdWcaD r«ply 
SS. Actraaa iJinm 

ui r. it 1 il 

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Solution on page 12 




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StrlcUy 
Personal 



Mother fears 
bike accidents 



ByPATand ' 
MARILYN DAVIS ^ 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: \ 

The lack of gasoline is the cause of a big ar- 
gumentat outhouse. Wehavetwoteenagers^ndpne 
chilcUn grade school. They all ride tucycles aoid I'tn 
concerned for their safety. My husband^ says 
bicycles are as safe now as they ever were. I say 
that's not a fact. Can you settle our (fisagreement? 

Mrs. A.B. 

Dear Mrs. A.B.: 

According to The Travelers Insurance Com- 
panies, it is imperative that nunre be done in the 
field of bicycle safety. It reports bicycle deaths rose 
by one-third in 1972 over the preceding year. 

Bicycle accidents in 1972 caused 1,000 deatiis and 
more than 102,000 injuries, accmrdii^ to statistics 
released by Ttie Travelers Companies. It seems 
that the statistics are on your side. 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

I think teen-agers today are a disgraceful lot; and 
you, who are in a position where you could help, are 
constantly sticking iq} for the younger generaticHi. 

Let me tell you Wk it is for a change. I have two 
sons. One a senior in high school and one who ^as in 
college. My older sop dro[q)ed out of coll^. He 
said be hated the courses. What lame brain decision 
do you think he made? He is now working as an 
apprentice for a plumbmg company and is per- 
fectly happy coming home dirty and grimy. He is a 
bri^ boy and could haye had an interesting life as 
a professional man instead of working in filth. 

My other son doesn't have the greatest grides 
am) my only hope is ttiat he will go to a junior 
c<Aege. Ilus was not how I [danned their lives. Why 
can't they see the wisdom of my opinions? Why do 
you say that coU^e isn't for everybody? Don't you 
realize that people read your column and just may 
believe what you say? 

i;^d 

Dear Dad: 

I do ha^ peo{de read the coltonn. But I still say 
that coU^e isn't for everyorK. If your son finds a 
sense d achievement and fulfillment as a irimnbo', 
he ndll be cont«ited peifon. Would you take that 
from him? Y«[yp mi^ Into in mind that there Are 
^aity of mea in th« plunUHng bwinen «^o hwve 
excdlent in<»mes. What would we do witlKxit 
tiiem? 

Many Ugh school sbidoits are wise to select a 
juniw coUege, mai^ are exraUeit. AUow you- sons 
the pivil^es of maUng th^ own dedsicns. They 
nuy make some mistakes but you can't force ttem 
to luve your ch«ams and ambiticms. 

Dear Pat aad Marlon: 

Do you Uunk tint a marriage based on om- 
venience can be aaccessfol? I <to mrt bdieve that 
love, as most of tn thiirii of It, luts forevw. 

Inuit 

Dmt Irene: 

I'd have to durt off my cryrtal l»ll before I could 
answo- that. Hoireva-, no (me can [M-edict the 
oirtcon» of any marriage. Kb^ in mind that 
marrii^ is not fw everywie. Unnarrtod peo|te 
tave mo n w rt a of imhanrinMs aad tendinww BUT 
liieii to do nunrrfed peofde. 

M«ria^ is frdtmbfy one of tte mort t^^ortant 
de d rt a a you'Bevfa'inahesocqBrttettwiftiattop 
&ni^. D«i*t becone a itatlstk:. 



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Th« Sun-Wednesday, May 8, 1974-Page 5 



Beach sweeps district golf tourney 



Bfitt propels 
f=irst Colonial 
to easy victory 



ByJOHNBANNON 
Sports Editor 

The teams were the same duly the wder of finish 
was changed from last week's city ©)lf tournament. 

Thursday, the Eastern Di^tript ^M tournament 
was played at the Eagle Haven golf course. It was 
nothing more than a mere formality. For the fifth 
consecutive year, the Beach played among 
themselves, while the Norfolk members of the 
district were relegated to the lower echelon of the 
standings. ' 

- First Colonial rebounded from their fourth place 
finish in the city tournament to take top district 
honors. Kellam, the city titlist, slipp^ to fourth in 
the dfetrict tourney. KempsviUe awjI^Princess Anne 
repeated their second and third place finishes as 
the Chiefs narrowly edged the defending state 
champions for the second straight .week. 

iTfE FOUR BEACH clubs will tarry the district's 
banner into the Eastern (lejgional tournament 
Tjiursday. 

"The 36-hole tournament vps marred by cold, 
windy weather and occasif^nal rain. The poor 
playing conditions led to abnormally high scores as 
no player was able to match the par 70 figure. 

- First Colonial controlled, the tourney from the 
outset, taking a commanding 12 stroke lead mid- 
way through the competition. The Patriots 
withstood late charges from KempsviUe and 
Princess Anne to post a winning team total of 617. 
KempsviUe finished nine strokes back of the 
dRtrict champions at 626. Princess Anne was one 
strdce back in third place with a total of 627. 

The Patriot victory ended the Cavaliers two-year 
reign as district titlists. Princess Anne's earning of 
4 regioiial, qualifying ^ot does keep the Cavaliers' 
hdpe of i record third consecutive state cham- 
pionship alive. 

PARRELLING THE CITY tournament, the 
telling rounds were carded by players not normally 
in the spotlight. Kellam's number four player Artie 
Watkins had Jed, the Knights to their city tour- 
nament win v^th ^two-under par 70. 

Following Watkin's lead, First Colonial's number 
three and four men, Ricardo Britt and Bill Cole, 




$OGER SAVAGE rearranges some sand in 
tK<^ Irap with this sliot at the Eastern 
District tournament. The KempsviUe senior 
managed to par the hole, despite the detour 
in'the sandHrap. (Sun photo by Rod Mann) 




PRINCESS ANNE'S Richard Tucker plays 
a shot from the 17th fairway during Eastern 
District tournament Thursday at Eagle 
Haven. The individual defending state 

combined to forge the Patriots early lead. Number 
four man Cole fired the day's lowest round With a 
three over par 73. Cole had two Wrdies on his first 
tour around the course. Britt carded eight con- 
secutive pars on the back nine for a four over par 
74 to get the Patriots off to a quick start. 
t. -iCole blew up to an 81 on h^.scicoqd foWnd,'but 
Britt continued his fine play. In another steady 
performance, the junior fired a 38-37-75. Britt's 36 
hole total of 149 earned him medalist honors in the 
tournament by two strokes. 

Buyoued by Britt's and Cole's performances, the 
Patriots easily outdistanced the field. Reynolds 
Dawson added a 75 on the first 18 holes as the 
Patriots were 22 over par at the half-way point. The 
Patriots slipped to a 316 team total for the final 
round, but the early lead was too much for Kemp- 
sviUe and Princess Anne to overcome. 

UNLIKE FIRST Colonial's comfortable first 
place margin, the battle for the three remaining 
qualifying spots was much more spirited. Kemp- 
sviUe and Princess Anne staged their own jM-ivate 
battle for the runner-up spot. City champion 
K^Uam weathered challenges from city rival 
BaySide and Norfolk's Lake Taylor to capture the 
final qualifying position. 

The Kempsville-Princess Anne battle was not 
decided until the final hole of the tournament. The 
Chiefs and Cavaliers finisted in a dead heat dt the 
halfway point, posting identical scores of 314. Kory 
Demun led the Chiefs in the opening round, carding 
a five over par 75. Mike Flenick was the Cavalier 
low man for the first 18 holes with a 74. 

The margin between the two clubs remained 
cloM, through the final round. Princess Anne's 
number three man Rich Ramsey gave the 
Cavalier's a momentary lead when he came home 
with a 74. 

The lead dissapated on the final hole of the 
tourney. Defending ituUvidual state champion 
Richard Tudcer ran into trouble on the final hole as 
his drive strayed into the trees on the left hand side 
(rf ti»e fairway. Trying to recover. Tucker pushed 
his next shot 20 yards right of the green. Tucker got 



champion ran hito trouble bogeying the hole 
and finishing his round with a double bogey 
as KempsviUe slipped by Princess Anne for 
second place. (Sun photo by Rod Mann) 

down in three from that unfortunate position for a 
double bogey six. Kempsville's Roger Savage, 
playing with Tucker, holed a short par putt to give 
the Chiefs the runner-up slot. 

KELLAM HAD SOME unexiffigted {«:^>tem» i» 

atheiPbeHtle for a regional berth. The Kitightsdid not 

play up to their city championship form, while 

Bayside and Lake Taylor turned in some of their 

best golf of the season. 

The Knights struggled to a 327 total for the first 18 
holes. Billy Woolard was the only Knight to break 
80, clinching the fourth spot at the halfway point for 
Kellam with a 78. 

Lake Taylor and Bayside were tied in fifth 
position at the halfway mark one stroke behind 
Kellam. The Marlins were moved into the 
challenging position on the strength of Don 
Newhart's play. The freshman carded one of his 
best rounds of the season with a six over par 76. 

Bayside could not keep pace with Kellam over the 
final 18 holes, finishing with a team total of 670. 
Kellam's play imoroved over the final round as the 
Knights look fourth place honors with a team total 
of 645. Lake Taylor fell to Kellam's charge on the 
final round, placing fifth ten strokes back. 

JOHN DOZIER clinched the regional spot for the 
Knights when he carded a 75. Woolard backed 
Dozier's effort, improving to a 77 on his second 
round. 

There was a logjam behind Britt for runner-up 
spot in the tourney. Three players carded 36-hole 
totals of 151 to tie for second place honors. Savage 
and Demun gave KempsviUe a strong 
representation both carding rounds <rf 76-75. 
Princess Anne's Flenick completed the second 
place traffic jam with a 74-77. 

Cole, despite his second round 81, finished third in 
the field five strokes behind leader Britt with a 36- 
hole total of 154. 

Seven players not on the qualifying teams earned 
spots in the upcoming regional tournament. It 
took a 166 to earn an individual 
berth. The Bayside duo of John An(tersen and 
Newhart were the other city players to qualify. 



PREVIEW 



BASEBALL RACE CLOSE 




SIDEUNIS 

By 

Join 
Baimon 

tporti Idter 



Fans earn split 
in aipitaliet war 



The major league baseball season is now in full 
swing, but pro football is continuing to dominate the 
headlines. Court battles over the right to a 
player's services in 1976 overshadow Graig 
NetUes' 11 home runs in AprU. The WFL-NFL 
alphabet war seems to pale all other sports 
accomplishments. 

Last week saw the running of the 100th Kentucky 
Derby, the debut of team tennis, the first victory of 
an expansion club over an established NHL team in 
a Stanley Cup playoff series and Julius Erving 
scoring 47 points in an ABA playoff game. All these 
accomplishments took a backseat to the big story of 
the week— Bill Bergey's court tribulations with the 
Cinncinati Bengals. 

Pete Rozelle's wildcard scramble brought slide 
rules and the functions of square roots to Uie world 
of sport. Now Gary Davidson and his WFL cronies ' 
seem hell-bent on making a book on contract law a 
sports writer's faithful companion. 

THE SIGNING of Miami's version of Butch 
Cassidy and the Sundance Kid gave the WFL instant 
credibility and sufficently stung the established 
NFL warlords. Seeing thehr private playground 
attacked witti signings and a television contract, 
the NFL struck back with a two pronged 
counterattack, laiuiching court cases and rule 
changes alm(»t simultaneously. 

The almost endless series of injunctions and law 
suits ttiat have marked the ABA's challenge of the 
NBA has made one thing clear. The only 
beneficaries from tiie running court battle are the 
l^ayers, who find a wider market to sell their wares 
at a hi^er (M-ice. The poor average fan get stuck 
with footing the bill for the inflated salaries. 

The present court battles and ttiose sure to follow 
will once again be borne on the shoulders of that 
ever-present scapegoat— the fan. Nary, a day goes 
by witlwut some modestly gifted football player 
signing a multi-year contract at a figure that just a 
few months ago would have been considered wildly 
exhorbitant. Someone is going to have to pay for 
those skyrocketing salaries. The fan, already 
forced to buy exhibition game tickets as part of his 
season ticket plan in some areas, will find the buck 
being passed to him once again. 

Still, the fan managed a split in developments on 
the NFL front last week. Whether motivated by the 
innovative WFL or the moimttag criticUim oC pro, 
foottmlVs attributes, the NFL made sweeping rule 
changes, which could turn the tide against the 
growing defensive dominance that has been the 
status quo in the NFL Ui the past few seas<»}s. 

mm MOVES aimed at limiting the efficiency of 
Held goal kickers and def«uiive backs, the NFL 
magnates are making an effort to s|rice up Super 
Bore— er Bowl VIII to a more interesting level than 
its somewhat less than climatic seven predecessors. 

From the fans point of view, unless you are a Tom 
Dempsey freak, the rule changes are welcome 
news. If expert authorities are to be believed (NFL 
defensive backs), the bomb has been put back in 
pro football. The 45-42 donneybroola hi the AFL's 
early history may make a comeback. 

Even though the rules have met with criticism 
from some corners especially from those where 
fleld goal kickers reside, the common cmisensua 
seems to be the NFL was in need of the overhauling. 
Odds are Garo Yepremian will still find kicking for 
field goals for the Dolphins more profitable than 
selling ties. 

The changes can not be all bad— George Allen 
didn't like them. However, one can question 
whether Charlie Waters needed anything to limit 
his effectiveness. 

The NFL may be quickly closhig in on the 
excitment of the college game. The 1974 season may 
offo- a contest which comes close to equalliim the 
quality of last season's Sugar Bowl match-up 
between .Alabama and Notre Dame. For now 
remember college tickets can be purchased at a 
rate less than a king's ransom. 



.f 




.f 



'i 



Tournev time imre . for Beagit teams 

M ... r. J f<.,m.m*n( In the citv aiKl chilli have posted tW» ieMoo, 



The high school spring sports 
Mason is entering its , most 
crucial week. Toumam^ts are 
the story in golf, tennis and 
tyack. A tighten«} basel^U race 
enters its last w«k with the title 
still 19 fcr grabs. 



Baselmll 



A week ago Bayside was 
sitting pretty atop liie Eastern 
Dfetrict standings with a two 
game lead over their 
pursuero^. A loss to Lake 
l^ylor changed the comptexloj 
of- tte pennant race at the 
TltaiU and defending state 
champion KempsviUe are 
farfBtMng dowa the MarUas 
btA ai^ooe iinM off te pace 
now. 

,, Bav^ l«s tits advantag of 
^^ig at home In their «ort 
to dbiiA tte pemiant. Friday, 
the MarUM host Norvlew ami 
close out the refotor mbmo 



against visiting Cox Tuesday. 

Kanpsville, winners of five 
strai^it, are on the road this 
week. Friday, KempsviUe 
travels to Princess Anne, before 
a Tuesday cimfrontation with 
last |dace Grairi>y. The Chief 
pitchii^ rotation at Jimmy 
Moore moA Beh Hurmtm have 
kept their team close, faUowii« 
their stumbUi^ distrkt start. 

First Cdwiial hosts Kellam to 
complete Friday's schedule. 
The KnighU dreams cf disblct 
bas^»ll tide were da^ied last 
week fin a loss to BoAet T. 
Washington. After a qutek start, 
Kellam has now (b-opped two 
strai^L 

Hie rematodor of l^e^iy's 
jdw^le ftads Fb^ Cdaelal 
vwting re^venated Priw^ 
Anne, and Kellam bating 
Norvlew. 

Despite the MarllM faihffe 
a^inst LAe T^ykir, ^yskfe to 
stm In the eommandiog 



position. No matter how 
KempsviUe and Lake Taylor 
play, it is up to the Marlim to 
win or lose the title. A split of 
thto week's action wiU Insure 
the MarUns of a tie for the 
championship. 

Trai^ 

Beach trams wiU be striving 
to maintain their dominance 
over Norf(& harriers when the 
Eastern DlsU-lct track 
toumametrt ap&a FrNfay at 
Lake Taylor. 

The meet is a two-day affair 
witii the fleU events scheluled 
for Friday afternoon. The 
naming eveite wiU be held cm 
Saterday. 

Bayskle, fresh from thar city 
meet wfai, must t>e rated the 
(avwite. Roscoe Cotas to a 
sarious tlmt to regmt hto 
triple (rf the dty meet C^s has 
kst only oiK« idl season and last 



week tied city meet records in 
the 100 and 220 bdore bettering 
the city 440 recwd by a six 
tenths of a sectmd. Col^ wiU 
have more cmnpetition at the 
district meet, but he is stlU the 
man to cateh. 

The MSirlins chances d 
capturing the team tide may 
have suffered a severe blow 
when Jerry M^ely pulled a 
hamstring in the lOO-yard dash 
finals. If Mosely does not make 
a quick recovery, the team 
points be could have delivered 
will be swely m^ed. 

Should Bayside falter, the 
dtotrict tiUe should still find a 
home in the Beach, First 
Colonial, Kellam and 
KempsviUe are all 

strong title contend- 
ers. KempsvUte was the sur- 
prise of the dty meet, fin- 
ishing only a point be- 
Mod champion Bayside. The 
ChteTs runner-up pe^ormance 



was keyed by Steve Sawyer and 
Matt Stevtoh, who combined to 
swe^ the 880, mUe and tte two- 
mile. 

The mile should again be the 
highlight of the festivities. 
Bayside's Eric Chapman, Cck's 
Brian RWnehart, Sawyw and 
Stevifh wUl stage a repeat 
of their city meet duel whldi 
saw all four harrier run in 
a pack for most of the race. 

Golf 

The-e are four kical trams 
with dreen^ of a stete g(4f 
championship. By Thursday 
afternoon the number will 
narrow considerably. The 
Eastern Regional golf 
touraameirt to scheduled for 
Thursday morning on Newp<rt 
New's Municipal golf course. 

First Cdonial, KempsviUe, 
Princes hwne and Kellam wiU 
be r^Hwentli* the Ewt^i 
District in the 18-hole 



toimament. In the city ami 
district toumamoits, die four 
teams have beoi jockeying Ua 
position with the KnigMs tekhig 
the city, and First Cdonlai 
capbiring the dtotrict crows. 

Only two trams wUl go on 
from the r^onal to the stete 
tournament inChartettesvUk on 
May 17. Odds are that the two 
trana re^ras«Jting the East«ti 
R^ion at die state touiuey wiU 
come f rdn Virginia Beach. On 
tlM hasto of scwe canparison, 
the teaoM from the 
Southeasto-n and Peninsula 
dtotitels are (&tiDct isMknk^. 

Laii yrar, tte Beach brought 
hoDM ffrst and tftird places In 
the rtate toiBiiam«it Princess 
Anae and Kempsvffle finished 
aoe-two In ^t yaar's re^oeal 
touni^. It MuW v«7 weU he 
Kellam and First Colwial 
tarry^ %m^ titte hc^M to 
OiarkMeiviOe. OwMeri^the 
oxwtolsntly low wemm Bead) 



chifas have posted tUs season, 
anything ton dian a swrap of 
tlwtop four HKrts in the regional 
wauU have to be ONinted as a 
lUsappolntment 

Tennis 

Tennto to ttie one spring sport 
where the possibility of Uie 
Beach i»niii« up em{^ hMided 
in the tttte ctiase seems iScdy. 
Local netnmn have handed aU 
their dtotrict rivato from 
Norfok— rave oi»-Mai»y. 

The defending dtotrict 
cbnapicN) Commodores have 
completed their second 
nicceraive umitef^ted srason. 

Tournament tennis to an 
entlrdy dtffereat atmosphere 
tlwn the head m toad 
cotfrontetleas ^ tte repikr 
MSMO. The bre^ of ^weds, 
cwU #0 a king way tamrdi 
decWi« the eventaial <MriiA 
tlttot. 



^ 



*" V* #■ ■«*■ *'■*•■-•"'%< ' 






maw 



Wige 6- -The Sun-Wednesday, May 8; 1974 




o!es leads Marlins to city track title 



ByJOIINBANNON 
] Sports KdiUir 

; Thf name Ls Roscoe Coles. For Bayside 
;at Ihe city track meet Friday, that name 
jneiint victory. 

; The marveiaisly gifted athlete was the 
iftost spectacular perfonncr on a record- 
Jareakiiig evening at Bayside. The swilt 
•senior blazed by the field itj the 100,220 and 
'the 440 to propel the Marlins to the city 
"championship. Surprising Keinpsville 



JThished a strong second, losing out on the 
team title by a mere one point 52-51. 

First Colonial and Kellam made strong 
bids for the team title but fell short in the 
final accounting. The two teams tied for 
third, posting team scores of 48. Princess 
Anne was well back in fifUi place with a 
total of 23. The Cavalier effort was 
hindered by the abscence of star sprinter 
Robbie Edwards. Cox completed the field 
with a laiSt place total of 18. 



FIRST COLONIAL br<*e to an earfy 
lead, exhibiting great strength in the fieki 
events. Jerry Ohnaizer and Ernie Davte 
combined to give the PatricMs a one-two 
finish in the shot put Ohnaizer took the 
crown with a heave of 52'7y4". Ken 
Kutledge of Kellam finisted third in the 
competition. It was Eutledge's 
first defeat of the outdoor season. 

Davis came back to give the Patriots a 
second place finish in the discus behind 



J 



f 




KempsviUe's Dan Campbell, who took first 
[riace honcrs with a throw of 127' iW- 

Bill Perry gave First Cdcmial a first in 
the pole vaatt competiticm, clearii« 12'9" 
to beat the field. Bert Lewis com|rieted the 
Patriot field showii^ with a first in the 
long jump and a tturd in the tri|de jump. 
Lewia' winning long jump of 22'10>^" 
broke ttie old city meet record by nine 
inches. Odes fiidsbed second in tfi? Um 
jump also bettering the M city mark. 

It was a sign of things to come. After 
running an unimpressive 10.0 in the 100- 
yard dash trials, C(^s took commaiui of 
the meet. Exploding from the startii« 
Modes, Coles was well in front of runner-up 
Lewis tying the existing city meet record 
of 9.9 in the i»'Ocess. 

NEXT IN THE procession of Coles' 
victories was U)e220. Again, Lewis was the 
runner-up. Turning it on out of tlw curve, 
Cdes tied another mark with a time of 
22.1. 

C<des saved his best for last Running his 
favorite race, the Marlin senior outclassed 
the field in the 440. Pulling away on the 
back stretch, Cdes relatively coasted to an 
easy ti-iumph. His time of 49.0 was ^ix- 
tenUis of a second better than the existir^ 
city me^ recwd. 



The higMight-irf the nmA. was the mite 
race. Bayalde's Eric Chapman. Cox's 
BrianRUneliartand the Keqp^UediMxrf 

Steve Sawyer and Matt Stavisb hoeked m^ 
inadasSKdudi. Thefour ran ina pack for 
dj^ first seven laps before Chapman puUed 
away at the start <rf the gun lap. The 
Bayside harrier beat beds a chaUense 
from Stavish on the backstretch. He covUl 
not h^ off the quidify closing Sawyer who 
took comnruind on the final tiffn and hdd 
on for the narrow victory. &iwyer^ 
winning time of 4: 17.8 was die taatest hl^ 
school mile in the Eastern Dtstrifct tiiis 
season. It also bettered die ecistihg city 
meet rec«tl by a fiill three seomds. 
Oupman and Stavish were also under Qie 
dd record. 

Sawyer returned to double in the 880. He 
again bested Chapman and Rhinehaft 
Sawyer became only the second local 
harrier tills year under two minutes in the 
880, takii^ first place honors with a time of 
1:58.8. Sawyer again caught Chapman on 
die final lap. 

IN THE TWO-MILE. Stavish tuisied iQ 
one of ti» more remarkable perf ormancfs 
of tiweveirings. Stavish ran mosUy agaimit 
tiie dock as ttie field failed to challenge 



him in his specialty. After laiqping half the 
nmners, Stavish turned in a blazing final 
lap to break yet anoUier dty record. 
Stavffih finished Uie two-mile distan<% in 
t:29 which was 19 seconds better tiian his 
best time this year. Stavish is tie only 
area two-miler to finish un<ter ten minutes 
thto season in the twomile. 

The efforts of the two long distance 
runners moved the Chiefs into a 
challenging position. Entering tiie final 
event of the meet, Kempsville had closed 
to within Oiree points of the leading 
Marlins. A fourth place finish in the mile 
relay chopped Uie gap to one, but Oieir 
chance at victory had gone by the boards, 
desi^teBayside'staileid finish in Uie event 

Princess Anne's Carl Frend dominated 

die hurdle ev«its, taking both Uie high 

hurdles and intermediate hurdlfs. Frend's 

time of 40.4 in the intermiale hurdles set a 

new city meet record. It was also the 

fastest time of any Beach hurdler this 

season. 

■i 
All else seemed to pale Uiough in the 

Ught of Coles' effort. "You can coach a 
lifetime and never have a boy like Coles," 
commented one city coach. Bayside has 
Coles right now, and Uiey won the city title. 



Patriots clinch city tennis title 



It was die week of the shutout 
in local high school tennis. The 
strong teams wer# 
overpowering, while Uie weaker 
teams played down to their 
reputation. 

In action Friday, four Beach 
squads posted shutouts, while 
two ci^ clubs wwe on Uie 
receiving end of wMtewashes. 
First Colonial blaidted Cox 9-0; 
Kellam shutout Bayside 9^>: 
Kempsville blasted Norview 9- 
0; and Princess Anne dropped 



Booker T. Washhigtdt »0. 

The Patriots easy, trium{^ 
over Cox was thdrr ninth 
c(Hisecutive win. First Colonial 
completed the Beach portion cf 
their schedule undefeated to 
dethrone defending champion 
Kenqisville as the city titie- 
holder. The Chiefs only loss in 
Beach action was a season 
opening 5-4 loss to First 
Cdonial. 

THE WIN ateo improved rhe 



Patriots distirict record to 8-1, 
insuring them of a second (dace 
(finish behind regillai\ season 
champion Maury. The 
Commodores completed their 
second successive undefeated 
seasMi with a win Fridaj^ 

Kellam's win over Bayside 
Was Uie Knights second sti|ight 
win^as Ui^ clinched a winiiiing 
fiiark for the regular seascm. 
For hapless Baysi(te, it was 
Uieir tenUi consecutive district 
loss, placing the Marlins last^n 



the standinp. 

Kempsville improved their 
district record to 7-2 with the 
shutout of Nw^riew. The Chiefs 
have won 11 of their last 12 
matches with a loss to Maury 
the lone setback. 

In action April 30, .Maury 
blanked Princess Ange 94); 
Kempsville shutout Booker T. 
Washingtmi 9-0; First Colonial 
blasted . Bayside 9-0; Kdlam 
downed Lake Taylor 6-3; and 
Cox fell to Norview 6-3. 



<^S^!S!SSm&^S!k 



iil^is 



Sports Record 



te%»AfeyftW«S8S«ftS:«;:«:S:S!:S*KSSiy:S*SSSSW* 



BAYSIDE'S ROSCOE Coles strains^for extra 

distance in the long jump competition during 

.the city track meet Friday at Bayside. Coles 



could not find enough distance, however, as 
First Colonial's Bert Lewis beat the Marlin 
track star. (Sun photo by Neal Sims) 



ThbWaek 



TMUMSOAY 

Oolf— Eastern Regional Tournament at 
ttie Municipal course in Newport Ne«n. 

FRIDAY 



Track— Eastern District Meet at Latie 

Taylor 

Taniili— Eastern District Tournament at 

Lskewood 

■ascban— Kerppsviile at Princess Anne 

Norview Bt Bayside Kellam at First 

Colonial 

SATURDAT 

Track— Eastern District Meet at Lake 
Taylor 



Tennis— Castarn District Tournament at 
Lalwwood 

TUESDAY 

Baseball— First Colonic at Princess Anne 
Norview at Kellam Cox at Bayside 
Kempsvillcft Granby 

Last Week 



BASEBALL 

Princess Anne « Maury 4 
Norview 6 Cox 2 
Kempsville 3 Kellam 
Bayside 7 First Colonial 2 
Kellam 5 Princess Anne 3 
Mairy 3 Cox 2 
Princess Anne 10 Granby I 
Booker T. Washington « Kellam 7 
Kempsville 7 Norview S . 
Lake Taylor 7 Bayside 3 



CITY TRACK MEET 
TEAM SCORES 



BaysMe S2 
Kempsville SI 
Kellam 4g 
First Cotonial 48 
Princess Anne 23 
cox 18 



TKNNIS 

Princess Anne 9 Booker T. Washington 

Kempsville 9 Norview 

First Cotonall » Cox 

Kellam 9 Cox 

Maury 9 Princess Anne 

Kempsville 9 Booker T. Wastiington 

First Cotonial 9 Bayside 

Kellam 6 Lake Taylor 3 

Norview 6 Cox 3 



EASTERN DISTRICT 

GOLDTOURNAMfNT 

TEAM SCORES 



I^IRST COLONIAL 
KEMPSVILLE 
PRINCESS ANNE 
KELLAM 

Lake Taylor 

BAYSIDE 

Granby 

AAaury 

COX 

Booker T. Washington 

Norview 



SOCCER 
STANDINGS 



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\ . ■ 

Bayside stumbles m pennant stretch 



The Sun-Wednesday. May 8. 1974-Pay 7 



Friday 

Lake Taylor 7 
Bayside 3 

Baysi(k's title expiisss made 
an unexpected detcNir Friday at 
Bayside. The Marlins' were 
enjoying a two-game 4ead 
thanks to a seven game winning 
streak whoose inception came at 
the expense <rf Lake Taylor. The 
Titans returned the favor, 
tightening the Eastern District 
pennant race with a 7-3 win. 

Craig Wiesner to<* the loss 
for the Marlins his first agaiiet 
three wins. The talented 
southpaw deserved a better 
fate. Wiesner wertt the distance 
for the fourth time this season, 
limiting the Titans to just four 
hits while striking out 14. In 
only one inning could the Titans 
put together two hits, but 
shoddy fielding led to two big 
Titan innings to snap the 
Bayside winning streak. 

Kempsville 7 
Norview % 

Kempsville flirted witJi title 
elimination once aeain. F<x the 
third time in as . many 
games, the defending state 



champion Chiefs had enoi«h to 
get by. 

Kempsville fril behind early 
as Norview reached Bob 
Harrison for five runs in Uie 
fffst feur innings. The Oiiefs 
managed to Ue the scwe with 
two runs in the fourUi and a 
single tally in the fifth. 

Alan Price delivered the 
pme winning blow with a two- 
run homer with one down in the 
eighth inning. Harrism hdped 
his own cause with kis second 
home run of the season. 
Harrison became the secKxid 
pitdier in the district to win f ivfe 
games with his fifth route going 
performance of the seasoa 

Booker T. Washington • 
KeUam? 

Kellam flirted with title 
eliiMnation and eot more than 
they bargained. Booker T. 
Washington dealt the death 
blow to Kellam's district title 
hopes with a »-7 win. 

The Knights spotted the 
Bookers nine runs in the 
opening two innings.Kellam 

starting {ritcher Rich Bloxom 
was dnv«|i from the mound in 
the s«:ond:piilig after yielding 
eight hits and nine runs. 




Mayl 



Kellam S IhrlBceu Ame 3 

kellam defeated Princess 
Anne 5-3 in a non^istrict game. 
Ed Mayo hurled his first 
complete game of the season to 
notch the victory, his third ot 
the season without a loss. Tom 
Morrissey homered for the 
wimto-s. 



April 30 



The margin was too much fbr 
the Knights to overcome even 
with five inninfB of no-hit relief 
by Joe Kwasny and a Frank 
Ludvik home run. 



Princess Anne 10 Granby 1 



It took Prinieess Anne awhile 
to get it going, but the Cavalien 
have finally found the winning 
touch, llie latest of Princess 
Anne's triumphs was an easy 
10-1 win over last place Granby. 

The Cavaliers got two-tdt 
pitching from Kevin Shee- 
han and thdr best offoisive 
production of the season. It was 



Sheehan's second victory of the 
week. 

Maury 3 Cox 2 

Mark Hodges hurled Cox's 
second complete game of the 
campaiga It went for naught, 
however, as Maury scared the 
game winner in the bottom of 
the seventh. The FalcMis had 
knotted matters at 2-2 with a 
single tally iin the top of the 
inning. 

Cox has now dn^ped four 
straight, leaving their district 
record at 3-5. The Falcons 

failure to Mt was costly in yet 
another one run decision. 
George Weeks limited the 
Falcons to three hits. 



Athletes of the Week 




STEVE SAWYER of 

Kempsville has been 
selected as a Virginia Bei^ch 
high school athlete of the 
week. Sawyer won the 880 
and Ihe mile at Friday's city 
track meet. 

Outrunning the city's best 
long distance runners. 
Sawyer bursted to a record 
time of 4:17.8 to take the 
mile. It was the fastest high 
school mile posted by an 
area harrier on the outdoor 
circuit this season. 



MATT STAVISH Of 

Kempsville has been 
selected as a Virginia Beach 
high school athlete of the 
week. Stavish turned in a 
remarkable two-mile 
performance at the city 
track meet Friday. 

The senioFv rutmiag 
mainly against the clock, 
bettered his be$t two-mile 
time by 19 seconds, 
breaking the city record 
with a time of 9:29. 



RICARDO BRITT of First 
Colonial has been selected 
as a Virginia Beach high 
school athlete of the wedc. 
llie junior was the medalist 
at the Easteni District golf 
tournament last Thursday 
over the Eagle Haven golf 
course. 

Despite poor playing 
conditions, Britt carded a 36 
hole toUl of 74-75-149 to take 
medalist honors by two 
strokes. 



ROSCOR COLES of 
Bayside has been selected 
as a Virginia Beach high 
school athlete of the week. 
Coles left no doubt as to the 
city's best sprinter, 
sweeping the 100,220 and the 
440. at the city meet. Coles 
tied two city recimis and s^ 
another is toadii^ the 
Marlins to the team title. 



Coles has now wtm the 
award three times. 



Bayside 7 First Colonial 2 

Bayside won their sixth 
straight district contest, while 
First Colonial was dropidng 
Uieir fifth consecutive game. 
Marty Moore hurled a three- 
hitter to pick up the win. 
Moore's reci^ is now 4-2 and 
he has won his last four 
decisions. 

The Marlins scored two runs 
in the second, two more in the 
fifth and iced the contest with a 
three-run burst in the top of the 
sixth inning. 

Kempsville 2 Kellam 

kempsville won an extra 
inning contest 2-0 in a game that 
was vital to both teams pennant 
chances. Righthander Jimmy 
Moore outdueled Kellam's Joe 
Kwasny to gain his fourth win of 
the season. 

Kwasny limited the Chiefs to 
just two hits, but fwced home 
the winning run with a bases 
loaded walk to Mike Crabtree in 
the top of the ninth inning. The 
final Kempsville run scored 

when catcher Scott Layden 
rolled the ball back to the 
mound on the mistaken belief 
Crabtree had been retired on 
strikes. 

Moore struckout 14 Knights 
while limiting them to four hits. 
His record is now 4-2, while 
Kwasny's record dropped to 5-2. 



Princess Anne 6 Maury 4 

Princess Anne finally tracked 
down that elusive first win with 
a 6-4 triumph over Maury. The 
Cavaliers staked th^m^elves to 
a 4-1 lead with a four-run 



outburst in the bottom of the 
first inning. 

Larry Ruble led the 
Princess Anne attack with his 
first home run of the season. 
Kevin Sheehan, who came on in 
relief of starter Dave Weldon in 
the fourth inning, picked up the 
win, his first apinst three 
tosses. "' • 

Norview C Cox 2 

Cox fell behind 3-0 in the early 
going and never quite pulled 
even. Norview clinched the 6-2 
win with a three-run burst in the 
top of the seventh. 

Jack Ferrell went the 
distance for the Falcons as his 
record dropped to 1-2. Cox 
continued to have troubles at 
the plate, managii^ only three 
hits. 

■ ASTERN DISTRICT 

HION SCHOOL tAliSALlL 

STANOINOt 



■AYSIDI 
KIMMVILLI 

Laka Taylor 

KELLAM 

AAaury 

Norvltw 

B.T. Wathinglon 

cox 

PIRIT COLONIAL 
PRINCES! ANNE 
Granby 



*.S -ST • 



OS 




,37S 3Vi 
.lU * 



.000 



TOPISNITTIRS 



Redui, Kallam 
ZImmerly, Cox 
Laydan, Kellam 
M O'Hara, Kemptvllla 
Butts, Prlnceu Ann* 
WIeinar, Bayildt 
Ruble, Princau Anna 
Morrluay, Kellam 
Crain, Kampsvllle 
Kwasny, Kellam 
Roebuck, Kellam 
Osborne, Bayside 
Swecker, First Colonial 
Culbartson, Princess Anne 
Moore, Bayside 
Klgar, Bayside 



HOME RUN 
LEADERS 

Swecker, First Colonial 
Kwasny, Kellam 
Butts, Princess Anne 
Harrison, Kempsville 
Redus, Kellam 
Morrissey, Kellam 
Ludvik, Kellam 
Price, Kempsville 
Ruble, Princess Anne 
Sheehan , Princess Anne 
Osborne, Bayside 
Tyner, Bayside 
Moore, Bayside 
Kiger, Bayside 
Foskey, Bayside 
M. O'Hara, Kempsville 
Hanson, Kempsville 



;^ GOMER 

pyLE 



Cox fetes athletes 
at annual banquet 



MONEY 

W» Provlda It 

I tMim you wt disabled due to 
• accident or sickness. 

; Call: 625-3604 

Harvey Liecke 

^ LINCOLN NATIONAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 



Virginia Squires will sorve as 
master d ceremonies. 

The banquet will honor 
Falcon athletes in all sports. 
The banquet ti^ins at 6:30 p.m. 
Tickets may be purchased 
through Cox athletic director 
Stu Hdland. Cost is $4.00. 




Cox high school's annual 
spring sports ; banquet will be 
Thursday night in the school 
cafeteria. Gary Simons, the 
head wrestling coach at Indiana 
State University, will be the 
guest speaker at the awards 
banquet. Mike Barrett of the 

City gymnasts 
drav^ blank 

Beach athletes had a 
frustrating time at the state 
boys gymnastics meet Saturday 
at Kellam. No local gymnast 
placed in the top four in any of 
the nine areas of cmnpetition. 
The city teams competing in the 
affair were well down the list in 
the team rankings. 

Manchester High School (rf 
Richmond took the team title 
with a score of 108.5L Robinson 
High School of Fairfax Count>' 
was in the runner-up slot with a 
team se»e of 99.42. edffng 
Herndon High School, who 
finished third with a score of 
98.48. 

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Gardening 



Page 8-The Sun-Wednesday, May 8, 1974 



J 






V 



\ 



U 



V 



Insects are 

causes of 

sooty mold 



Q. What can I do to control the black 
mold which is on my holly leaves? 

A. This problem is referred to as bl^ck 
sooty mold, but anytime you notice sooty 
mold you know you have an insect 
infestation somewhere on the plant. 
Black sooty mold thrives on the 
excrement of such insects as scales, 
aphids, whitefly and mealybug. Once you 
have identified the insect problem and 
taken corrective measures you will rid 
your plant of the black sooty mold. 




questkxis & answers about lawns & gardens 



Q. Is it helpful to mulch my vegetable 
garden? 

A. Mulching with any organic material 
is an added plus to your gardening 
chores. A good mulch will help control 
weeds and help conserve moisture during 
the summer. Don't mulch around 
tomatoes and peppers until you notice the 
first fruit set. 



Q. What is causing the leaves of my 
new fruit trees to dry up along the leaf 
edge? 

A. We have been having very warm 
temperatures with strong winds recently 
and this causes a great deal of stress of 
newly planted trees and shrubs. Even 
ttimigh the soil has plenty of mois- 
ture the plant leaves are losing it 
faster than the root system can absorb 
the needted water. When it is Vwt and 
windy you will find that misting your new 
plants at least once a day will help 
minimize wind burn. 



Q. What could be causing the leaves of 
my gardenia to yellow and eventually faU 
off? 

A. You should expect some of the ol<ter 
leaves to yellow and fall each year about 
this time. If the new foliage is yellowing 
then you should get a soil test made to 
find out if the soil pH is too high and your 
plants are suffering from iron chlorosis. 



Hotline wUl be gfad to answer your (fuestions about lawns and 
gardens. Send vour questions to iloObw. Virginia Beach Sun. 
1S8 Rosemont Road, Virginia Beach, Va. 23452. 



FROM 

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Tomatoes • Peppers • Geraniums 



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Hanging Baskets - House Plwitt - Permanwt Ar- 
wigements & Cemetery Wreaths made to drder 
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Flowering vines 
ciimb witii coior 



Annual flowering vines are 
very useful for many locations 
around the home. They add new 
interest to the landscape when 
grown on a fence, arbor or 
trellis. They grow rapidly to 
form an attractive mass (rf 
foliage and flowers. 

Annual vines climb by 
twining around a suppwt or by 
clinging with tendrils. A wooden 
lattice, woven wire fencing, or 
string is all that is needed. 
Vines may be used to prpvide 
shade along a porch, giv£ new 
charm to a fence or add color 
and new appeal to the side of the 
garage. 

The Morning Glory is one of 
the most colorful vines you can 
plant. The flowers are four to 
five inches across and are borne 
freely on vines which may grow 
to a height of 12 to 15 feet. Pure 
brilliant colors are available in 
white and shades of blue and 
red. 

MORNING Glories must be 
grown on a well drained soil in a 
warm sunny location. Avoid a 
rich soil and excessive 
fertilization which would 
produce vigorous vines with few 
flowers. The plants are tender 
to frost. Start seeds indoors in 
four inch pots, and plant 
outdoors two or three weeks 
after the average last ftet 
date. Soaking the seeds in water 
overnight will speed 
germination. 

The Cup-and-Saucer Vine, or 
Cathedral Bells, grows rapidly 
to a height of 20 feet or more. It 
climbs on any support with a 
rough surface by tendrils at the 
end of the leaves. This vine will 
grow in a sunny or shady 
location. The plants are free (rf 




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EXTENSION DIVISION 



insect and disease problems. 

The flowers (A the Cup-and- 
Saucer vine are bell shaped, 
about two inches long. They are 
green at first and become blue 
or violet when fully open. They 
will bloom from midsummer 
until killed by frost. 

The Moonflower (Passion 
Flower) produces pure white 
fragrant blooms nearly' six 
inches across. The vines grow 
rapidly to a height of 20 feet or 
more. The large heart-shaped 
leaves overlap to provide dense 
shade when used on a pergola or 
on a lattice along a porch. 

MOONFLOWER plants 
should be started indoors in 
small pots. Nick the tough 
seedcoat with a file, and soak in 
water overnight. The flowers 
open during the evening and 
remain open until about noon 
the next day. 

Nasturtiums are available in 
low bushy forms and vines 
which grow four or five feet tall. 
They bloom profusely, 
producing fragrant flowers in 
shades or red and yellow. Plant 
in well drained soils of average 
or low fertility. In rich soil they 
.will produce mostly leaves and 
very few flowers. 



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The Canary Bird Flower is 
closely related to the 
nasturtium. This , tender vine 
grows to a height of about eight 
feet. The flowers have two large 
fringed petals, three smaller 
ones and a green spur. 

Gourds have rather 
inconspicuous flowers but 
{MToduce colorful fruit which are 
ornamental on the vine during 
late summer. They may then be 
dried for fall and winter 
arrangements in the home. 

THE SCARLET Runner bean 
grows to a height (rf about six 
feet. It has bright scarlet 
flowers which are produced in 
attractive clusters starting 
about 65 days after planting. 
The fruit pods are similar in 
shape to lima beans and the 
seeds may be eaten in the green 
shell stage. 

Sweet Peas are excellent for 
training on a wire fence support 
as a screen at the edge of the 
garden. They will provide 
abundant flowers for 
arrangements in the home. 
Plant sizes are now available 
from one to six feet tall. Som? 
varieties are quite tolerant of 
warm weather. 




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The Sun-W«dnMdav. May 8. 1974-Page 9 



Biyoeg 




"«** 



MECZYSLAW MORAWSKI 



Variety is billet Ih&ne 



Classical ballet, modern, Jazz and character 
dance will be featured in k "Kaleidoscope of 
Dance," the spring performance of the Virginia 
Beach Civic Ballet, Saturday and Sunday at Plaza 
Junior High School. 

Thirty ballet company members will dance to a 
variety of music from Beethoven and Chopin to jazz 
and the blues. It is the first dance production under 
the direction of Russian-trained Mieczyslaw 
Morawski, who became the Civic Ballet's artistic 
director last fall. ' 

,The performers will, premiere the "Chopin 
Suite," with music by Frederic Chopin and 
choreography by Mr. Morawski. Dancers Shirley 
Oakes and John Medlin will perform "Andante 
Spinnato." f 

JAMES AMBROSE AND Linda Searls will be 
fKitured in a pas de deax from "Sleeping Beauty." 
Original choreograp|iy was created by Marius 
Petipa and has beenMopted by Mr. Morawski for 
this performance. 



"Awakening" is a special modern dance selection 
which has been staged by dancer Linda Searls. Ms. 
Searls and Petra Wirth will perform the number. 

DeW)y Benvin has choreographed and will per- 
form a jazz impression number entitled "Give It 
Up." Ms. Benvin, Ms. Searls, Ms. Oakes, Ms. 
Wirth, Mr. Ambrose and Mr. Medlin will also dance 
the "Waltz." 

OTHER NUMBERS IN the ballet program in- 
clude a polka entitled "Bumming Around", 
"Trepak" from the "Nutcracker Suite," the 
"Mazurka" and a dance to the first movement <rf 
Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. Junior and ap- 
prentice members of the ballet company will 
perform "Greeting Polonaise." 

Curtain time is 8 p.m. Saturday and 3 p.m. 
Sunday. Tickets are $2.50 for adults and $1.25 for 
children and may be purchased in advance by 
calling Ruby Timlin at 426-7550, or at the Maza 
Junior High box office before each performance. 



4th WORKSHOP 



Stanger will guide musicians 



A week-long music experience awaits area youth 
August 18-25 at the annual Virginia Wesleyan 
Orchestra Workshop. 

Now in its fourth year, the workshop offers 
Tidewater student musicians in seventh through 
12th grades an opportunity for advtaced, con- 
centrated music study under area musicians and 
teachers in string, woodwind, brass and percussion 
instruments. 

The workshop orchestra will be under the 
direction of Russell Stanger, music director of the 
Norfolk Symphony Orchestra. Mr. Stanger is a 
graduate of the New England Conservatory of 
Music He has been guest conductor in the U.S. and 
abroad with music groups includmg the 
Philadelphia Orchestra, the New York Philhar- 
monic, Royal Philharmonic and I'Orchestra 
Symphonique des Reims. He helped organize the 
Boston Little Orchestra in 1958 and has been 
Norfolk Symf*ony music director since 1966. 

cmER TEACHERS at the workshop will include 
Norfolk Symphony members Ronald Marshall, 
Janet Kriner, Greg Barnes and Linda Decker. 
GradiBte students Dan Tindall j(East Carohna 
Univa^ity) and Wallace Clark (University of 
Maryland) will also be workshop instructws. 
«b - Morning sessions during thp workshop will in- 
clude class instruction for the different sections of 
the orchestra, as well as a full-orchestra practice. 

"The jM-oblem has been that in the summer there 
is no activity for student orchestra players," saj^ 
Dr. David Clayton, director of Virginia Wesleyan's 
music |»-o^am and woricshop coordinator. "Tlie 
idea (rf the workshop is to give the kids an op- 
portupity to be active vi^g^g^instruments in the 



summer. It's planned in the late summer to help get 
them back into shape for their school orchestras or 
other groups in which they may play." 

WHILE PARTICIPATING in the week-long 
workshop, students will live and study in the 
Virginia Wesleyan College facilities. Late af- 
ternoon and evening recreation and cultural ac- 
tivities will be available for students and are in- 
claded in the tuition for the woricshop. Workshop 
instructors will perform in one evening session and 
outside music groups may be booked for other 
evening concerts. The workshop will conclude with 
a 3 p.m. concert Aug. 25 by members (rf the student 
Workshop Orchestra. 

The summer workshop is presented in 
cooperation with the Norfolk Symphony 
Association, the Virginia Beach Chamber of Com- 
merce and the Virginia Beach Friends of Music. The 
last two years, the program has been partially 
financed by federal grants and through student 
tuition. Application has been made for a grant this 
year. 

Last year's workshop study attracted 70 students^ 
and this year, coordinators of the event expect 80 or 
more youths. Application deadline is July 1 . Tuition 
for the wedc (including room and board) is $80. A 
limited number of cwnmuting students will be 
accepted for a fee <rf $55 (including tuition and 
«Rmches). All junior high and high school students 
currently stucfyir^ music in school or privacy are 

welcome. ,_ . u i 

Applications are available from area high school 

and junior high orchestra directors or by writing 

Dr'bavid Clayton, Orchestra WorksiMp, Virginia 

. Wesleyan CoUege, Norfolk, Va. 23502. 



Chorus has lively show 



Education and entertainment are not always 
found in one program. But performances of the 
Virginia Beach Civic Chorus always seem to offer 
both, and "Time Capsule 1974" was no exception. 

In its seasonal concert this week, the chorus 
performed an ambitious selection of music from 
what one audience member described as "heavy" 
to up-to-date light-hearted pop tunes. Starting off 
with the symjrtionic poem "The Chief Justice, John 
Marshall," the chorus gave the audience a taste of 
patriotism, performing with the Faculty Concert 
Band of the Armed Forces School of Music. 

The work, a new piece of music written by Paul 
Whear, is part of a trilogy composed in honor of the 
chief justice. The chorus premiered the work in 
March at Little Creek Naval Base with the com- 
poser conducting. This week's concert featured Lee 
Lively in the speaking role of John Marshall and 
Henry Clarke as the narrator. The production was 
overwhelming, but as is the case in many band- 
chorus performances, the chorus voices oc- 
casionally lost out to the loudness of the band. 

THE CHORUS ENTERED the second half of the 
program with a lively presentation of the score 
from "Godspell." They glided through "We've Only 
Just Begun" and "Those Were the Days" with 
chorus members, particularly those in the bass 
section "rocking out" to the music. The chorus was 
accompanied by pianist Carol Noona, with "Tom 
Jeffreys on percussion and A! Morris on bass guitar 
during the second half of the concert. 

The stand-out of soloists had to be Lee Lively 
with his personable rendition of "Bad, Bad Leroy 
Brown." Several chorus members began to snicker 
as Mr. Lively prepared for his stage entrance and 
the audience roared as he stepped out clad in a red 
and blue plaid suit, dark glasses, high-heeled boots 
and holding a slim cigar in his teeth. Mr. Lively 
strutted on and off stage, pausing for a soul hand 
slap with conductor Walter Noona after his per- 
formance. 

Soloist Anthony Rossi poured out a little heart 
and soul in "Time in a Bottle," while Joyce 
Coulsting gave the audience a sassy "Last Time I 
Saw Him." Faye Edwards performed "For All We 
Know" and Enid Clarke sang "The Way We Were." 

THERE WAS A slight problem when it came to 
the solo pieces Sunday. The microphone must not 
have been turned up. Only once during the five solo 



Adult 

musi<:al 

opens 

An Adult musical, 
"Jacques Brel Is Alive and 
Well and Living in Paris" 
will be on stage at the Little 
Theatre of Virginia Beach 
Friday and Saturday. 

The play, being per- 
formed by a new acting 
company called The Rich- 
mond Players, offers a 
montage of 25 songs com- 
menting on life and 
emotions. Music is by 
songwriter Jacques Brel. 
The company is under the 
direction of Alison Hoffman 
and Loren Carrier, 
professors at Virginia 
Commonwealth University. 



The show will feature 
dancers Robban Hoffman 
and Kala Kaminsky (right). 
Other cast members are 
Patricia George, Cherie 
Scheer, Ron Manville and 
Mark Kushman with 
musicians Brook Gomto (of 
Virginia Beach), Jeanene 
Alvis and Doug Barnum. 



^ Curtain time is 8:30 p.m. 
Tickets are $3.^ for adults 
and $2 for students through 
college age. The play has a 
GP-R rating, according to 
play promoters. Reser- 
vations may be made by 
calling the Little Theatre at 
riS ^8-9523. 



Tom Boys mdcing lug 'Ms.-tafre' 



Little League, that bastion of little boy ai- 
deavor, is beii]« stormed by girls. 

As spring practice gets under way, lawsiats are 
popping up nationwide - even in proper old Boston 
- against LitUe League. 

(pinions of the expeite are mixed, fve^body 
from major league pitchers to P^yf jatriste have 
proed airf conned the subject, and I don't wart to 
haggle here about constitutional rights or fragile 
bones. 

ALL I WANT to do is teU those litUe girls who 
are fighting so desperately for their turn e* bat that 
they fre making a big Ms-take. (Pardon me. but I 

had to say it.) .. -4 • » tu^ 

Girls. *>n't you realize if you make it mto tne 
Little LeagiKS the American Tom Boy wiU 
disappear? The Tom B(^ - that special kind tf 
indepewtent girl boys make fun of but re^ject 
b^eause she can cUmb a f«ice, build a h^ howe <»• 

t»t a tell jwt as well s& they can. 

a*e's as fiy as a bird awl as unregn»i«^Ma 

firtd or wild nrmvn If vmi ^ iueew tm m. 




into uniform . you will ha ve to turn up for practice at 
SD«:ial times twice a week. You'U have to piay baU 
every weekend, and you'U have to tuck in yair 
shirttails, g^ out of yow favorite sn^keis and mto 
cleats. ^ 

I TELL YOU. GIRLS toe whole Torn ^ 
commui^ity wiU collapse. Do you want to sit in^ 
dugout in unifwm and Ht^ to somebw^'s lather 



take roll call before the game? Do you givea hang if 
your mother and little brother are in the stands 
watching you round second? Do you want to seU 
tickets to the LitUe League dance? 

Or would you raUier get up on Saturday morning 
and do what you want - pull on those dear, familwr 
blue jeans, ^b a sweater and breaWast. thai caH 
over your shoulder as you ride y^^^""?"^^^ 
driveway, "I'm goin' to the dirt lot. There s a game 
over there."' 

It might not even be basebaU - it could be 

anything or nothing. Maybe just the gu>s seeii^ 

wlw can throw a pebble farthest. They might say, 

•Yaaa. beat it..." but you toss one too and it^ 

clear out of si^it. Great feeling. No trq)hy nee^. 

"Yaaa, yourself." you say and hop on ywir DiKe 
for your own pursuit of self. B^!*^'*!^"^?."; 
Bmr btaawns md chiltBiood is left behind, when the 
\«Lm come off and the freckles fade, you wwt 
r«^y care thrt much abwt going on to tte tag 
toufi^ and catching for the Cincinnati Reds 



lew 



"Time Captule 1974" was the annual ipring concert pre- 
sented by the Vltginb Beach Civic Chorus Sunday and Mon- 
day at Princess Anne High School The chorus is under the 
direction of Walter Noona. The Faculty Concert Band of the 
Armed Forces School of Music appeared with the chorus for 
the first time in a paid public performance. 



performances could the singer be heard over the 
auditorium speakers. Fortunately, each of the 
singers was blessed with a voice that carried well, 
so it was not too dlsU-acting from their per- 
formance. 

The chorus got together after the solos for an 
optimistic ending of "Hope For The Future," "An 
Answer for Our Time" and "Take Up the Hammer 
of Hope." So pleased was the audience and so long 
did they clap that the chorus gave them an added 
treat of "Jesus Christ Superstar," not originally on 
the program. 

As all chorus concerts, "Time Capsule 1974" 
displayed the diversified talents of the chorus 
members under the direction of Mr. Noona. Mr. 
Noona, who is a master at the piano (and ac- 
companied each of the soloists) again showed his 
mastery as a conductor. It is always an experience 
watching him motivate the chorus and bring them 
to a peak of performing abilities. Mr. Noona 
becomes so involved with the music that he even 
occasionally leaves the directors' stand as he 
jumps and moves with the music. 

The Virginia Beach Civic Chorus is a gifted 
group of persons who get together because they 
enjoy singing and performing. And many persons 
are not turning out in support of the group. Per- 
forming before an audience of some 600 persons 
Sunday, the chorus was expecting a packed house 
for Monday night's concert. Word must have gotten 
around about what an exciting concert program the 
group offers its audiences. 

If there is one regret that a pprson might have 
about attending a Civic Cliorus Concert, it would be 
iiwi tne gioup only performs two major concerts 
each year. 

-Linda Miller 




Inside 

lifestyles 



Brid«s -"••'•0 

Focxl «■•■ ............< I" 

Sun Dial • ^^ 

Mi#on • ••■ ' ' 



JSi* 4.^ 



Pafle 10— The Sun-Wednesday, May 8, 1974 




FOOD 



Fimts, vegetables make 
intriguing new desserts 



Fruits and vegetables can 
help y<M serve conversation- 
type desserts for many sodal 



events. The flavors of most 
fruit and vegetable desserts 
are weU-known, but those of 




APRICOT CHIFFON cake, frosted with l«mon 
whipped cream studded with almonds, is a 
tasty idea for a tea party or other special 
occasion. 



|TTii\ 



425-9335 



" 'oriental ARTS & CURIOS 

HOURS: 10 a.m. TO 6:00 p.m. 
CLOSED SUN. b MON. 



716 FIRST COLUNIAL 
HILLTOP WKST 



(Behind McDonalds on l.askin Kd.) 





I 
t 



I For Mother's Day . . . 

Send her the FTD | 
Sweet Surprise lyi 

A green and growing >^< 

plant with fresh | 

flower accents, in a *^' 

dainty hand-painted;^; 

^^^eramlc bucket - usually !jl, 

available for less than 12. j$, 

u- \J- «■ t-iouffe Of j—lowers ffl 

300 LONDON BRIDGE | 

SHOPPING CENTER '^' 

VA. BEACH 

^£&* B.J. Schwartz 340-4422 



two newcomers, Orange- 
Carrot Silk Pie and Apricot 
Chiffon Cake, puzzle most 
partakers who are intrigued 
but puzzled by flavoring in- 
gredients. 

APRICOT CHIFFON CAKE 
(MakeslltelZservlBgs) 

1 can (30 ounces) apricot 
halves 

2V4 cups cake flour 
m cups sugar 
1 tablespoon baking powder 

1 teaspoon salt 
H cvft salad oil 
5 egg yolks 

2 teoqxwns grated lemon 
peel 

1 cup egg whites, 7 to 8 

V^ teaspoon cream of tartar 

Lemon whipped cream 
(note) 

Vt cup toasted sliced al- 
monds 

Drain apricots, reserving 
two-thirds of the syrup for 
liquid in the cake. Puree apri- 
cots in electric blender or food 
mill. Measure 1 cup puree for 
cake; chill remain!^ puree 
for garnish. 

Sift flour, sugary baking 
powder and salt into large 
mhdng bowl; "make a well" 
in center. Add oil, egg yolks, 
two-thirds cup apricot synq), 
1 cup apricot puree and lemon 
peel. Beat mixture thorougtily 
until smooth. 

Beat egg whites with cream 
of tartar until stiff peaks 
fbrm. (Do not underbeat.) 
Gently fold egg-yolk mixture 
into beaten whites using a 
whisk or rubber spatula. Four 
into an ungreased 10-inch tube 
pan; bake in 325 degree 
oven 55 minutes. Increase 
oven temperature to 350 de- 
grees; bake 10 minutes longer 
or until cake tests done. In- 
vert pan over neck of bottle; 
allow cake to hang until cool. 
With spatula carrfully loosoi 
cake from pan; remove. Cool 
on wire raci with narrow part 
of cake on bottom. Brush ex- 
cess crumbs from cake. 

At serving time, frost cake 
with Lemon Whipped Cnam 
(Note). Stud ddes of cake 
irith aknands; driade re- 
served two-tMrds cup apricot 
puree over top of cake. Serves 

10 to 12. 

ORANGE-CARROT 
BUS PIE 

1 unbaked 94ndi pie shell 
1 cui (13 oz.) evaporated 

(Adveitiwment) ■ 

FOOD 

FOR 

THOUGHT 

By PAUL ROMAN 

To prevent Macaroni from 
boiling over, add a 
tablespoon of butter or 
shortening to the water 
before adding the pasta. 



mUkwcream 
1 tdl)leq>«Ni grated orange 

peel. 
3 eggs 
1% ci^M mashed cooked 

carrots 
Icup sugar 

1 teaqmm ground glider 
1 teaaiXMin grouid dnna- 

mon 

H teaspoon salt 

H teaspoon ground nutm^ 
One-third teaspoon ground 

cloves 
Whipped cream 
Oiopped preserved ^nger 

In small saucepan scald 
milk and orange ped. Cod. 
Beat eggs; add mashed .car- 
rots and milk. Work mixture 
ttu-ough a sieve with bade 
edge of wooden spoon or 
qiatula. Stir together sugar 
and spices; add to carrot mix- 
ture and Uend well. Pour into 
9-inch tmbaked pie didl. Bake 
in preheated 450 d^ree ov«i 
10 minutiea; reduce heat to 32S 
degrees and coi^inue baking 
40 minutes. A knife inserted 
between center and edge will 
come out dean when done. 
Cool and Chill. GamiiAi with 
iHdpped cream and chopped 
preserved gin^. 

Pastry for Single Crvt Pie: 
1% cups enriched flour 

(note) 

% teaspoon salt 
yk ciq) shortening 
3to6tableqMonscdd water 

Stir together flour and salt 
Cut in shortening until pieces 
are size of small peas. 
Sprinkle with water, a table- 
spoon at a time, mixing li^t- 
ly untU dough begins to stidc 
together. Ptma into balL Roll 
out on Ughtiy floured surface 
to drde Vfa inch thick and fit 
loosely into pan. Trim pastry 
and flute edge. 

Note: Spoon flour into dry 
measwing cup; levd. Do not 
scoop. 



FOR THE FUTURE 

STUDENT ART wortts ar« 
currently on display at Virginia 
Wesleyan College. All types of 
art will remain on view at the 
coOege through May 19. The 
works are on display in the 
college's Henry Clay Hofheimer 
n Library. 

THE FOSTER parents 
program of the City of Virginia 
Beach will be the subject of a 
talk by social worker J.P. Parry 
at tonight's meeting of the 
PrincessAnne Plaza Civic 
League, 7:30 at Plaza Junior 
High School. 

MRS. GARY LAllSON, flrst 
vice-president of the League of 
Women Voters of Norfolk- 
Virginia Beach, is attending the 
national convention of the 
League of Women Voters of the 
U.S. in San Francisco this wedc. 
The convention ends Friday. 

^ 'niEOLOGIAN, authw and 
speaker Dr. Norman Vincent 
Peale will speak at a dinner 
tonight at Scope sponsored by 
the Tidewater chapter, 
American Institute of Banking. 
The dinner begins at 7 p.m. 
Information may be obtained 
from Jan Sdiindler at 428-3333 
or ^8-2530. 

THE SEASHORE will be the 
site of children's weekly story 
hours Thursdays at the Virginia 
Beach branch library (302 22nd 
St.) this wedc through May 30. 
Parents are asked to 
accompany their children when 
they walk from the library to 
the beach. In case of rain, 
Thursday story hours will be 
held inside the library as usual. 
Saturday story hours continue 
at 10:30 a.m. in the library. 

"OCEAN exploration — Past 
and Present" will be the topic of 




a talk by Ronald Johnson of Old 
Dwninion University Thursday 
at 7:30 p. m. at the meeting of 
the Avalon Terrace Civic 
League. The meeting will be at 
the Kempsville branch library. 

DRAMA STUDENTS from 
Tidewater Community College 
Virginia Beach campus will 
present two one-act plays and a 
dramatic monologue Thursday 
at 8:30 p.m. at the Little 
Theatre of Virginia Beach, 24th 
Street and Barberton Drive. 
Admission is free. 

THE ANNUAL banquet of the 
Virginia Academy of Science 
will be Thursday at 7 p.m. at 
Old Dominion University's 
Webb Center. Dr. Thomas 0. 
Paine, senior vice-president <A 
General Electric and former 
NASA administrator, will speak 
cm "Science and the World of 
Tomorrow." 

SCENES from "South 
Pacific" will be performed by 
the sbcth and seventh grade 
chorus of Windsor Woods 
Elementary School May 14-17 at 
7:15 p.m. in the school 
cafetorium. Admission is $1 for 
adults and 50 cents for children. 

THE ANNUAL meeting of the 
Virginia Society of Ornithology 
will be Fridy and Saturday at 
the Mariner Motor Inn, 57th 
Street and Oceanfront. The 
meeting is sponsored by the 
Cape Henry Audubon Societ\. 

CHILDREN'S films Saturday 
at 11 a.m. at the Windsor Woods 
and Virginia Beach branch 
libraries are "Old Mother 
Hubbard and Her Dog," "Miss 
Esta Maud's Secret" and 
"Baby Animals" (Virginia 
Beach branch) and "Caps for 
Sale" and "Amelia and the 
Angel" (Windsor Wood? 
branch). 

A GARAGE SALE sponsored 
by the Submarine Officers' 
Wives Club will be Saturday 
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the 
Navy Fleet Recreation Center, 
Hampton Boulevard and 90th 
Street, Norfolk. The sale 
benefits the Dolphin 
Scholarship Foundatioa 

ART WORKS will be rai 
display Saturday and Sunday at 
the third annual Ghent Art 
Festival sponsored by the 
Norfolk Free Clinic. The show 
will be in Norfolk's Stockl^ 
Gardens. Information may be 
obtained from the Free Clinic at 
625-5444. 



"KALEIDOSCOPE of 
Dance" will be the siH-ing 
(HVgram of the Virginia Beach 
Civic Ballet Saturday (8 p.m.) 
and Sunday (3 p.m.) at Plaza 
Junior High School. Tickets are 
18.50 (ae adults and 11.25 for 
children, available at the door 
or in advance by calling R. 
Timlin at 426-7550. 







I 

I 



viJ 



BIST PICTURE 
OF THE YEAR 



Baste your baked ham with 
a cola drink every IS 
minutes. Provides a great 
flavor and glaze. 

A quarter teaspoon of 
bicarbonate ot soda is the 
secret of light, fluffy 
mashed potatoes. 

FOR AN ENJOYABLE 
MEAL - SPECIAUZING 
llN CHARBROILED 
STEAKS. MEXICAN FOOD 
AND LOW, LOW PRICES 
■ TRY THE 



/■ 




A GEORGE RWHIIFIM 

THE STING 









WINNER OF 7 ACADEMY AWARDS 





MRS. FARMER 

Farmer-Teahan 

Kathleen Mary Teahan 
became the bride of Peter 
Harrington Farmer Saturday at 
St. Peter Ckver Ctairch, West 
Hartford, Conn. 

Tte bride is the daughter of 
Dr. and Mrs. John W. Teahan of 
West Hartford. The bridegroom 
is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Richard H. Farmer of Virginia 
Beach. 

The bride's attoidants were 
Carol Tesone, Mrs. Charles 
Boss and Estelle Charbot. 

John W. Teahan, brother of 
thebriderwaf**st man. Ushers 
viat CharlM Boss andc^e 
Patrick. -' , 

The couple will resiife in 
Worcester, Mass. 



Skinner-Sadowski 

1"^^^^^ . Susan Maria Sadowsk' 
George Frank SWmierJr 



3MM;WEK 



««• »:« tsM 7]« WW 





FOR THE RECORD 

INSTALLATION of officers of 
Holland Elementary School 
PTA was conducted during the 
school's annual S[»ing Festival 
of Arts. Officers for Oie 1974-75 
school year are: president, 
Willie Jarrell; first vice- 
president, Mary McDonald; 
second vice-president, Ruth 
York; recording secretary, 
Betty Schroeder; 
corresponding secretary, Jim 
Crockett; treasurer, Kay 
Crockett; historian, Marllou 
Schlndler; parliamentarian, 
Jim Brown, and delegate, 
Barbara Eward. 

BUSINESS representatives 
displayed information cm 45 
career choices during the 
second annual "Careers 
Unlimited" day hdd recently at 
Kempsville High School. 
Invited to attend were ^Idance 
counselors and administrative 
staff of all Virginia Beach 
secondary schools, central 
administration personnel from 
all Virginia Beach schools, City 
Council members and School 
Board members. 



MRS. SKINNER 



wed Saturday at Star of the Sea 
Catholic Church. 

The bride Is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Leo George 
Sadowskl of Virginia Beach. 
The brid^room Is the scm of 
Mr. and Mrs. George Frank 
Skinner of Portsmouth. 

Mary Sadowskl was her 
sister's maid of honor. 
Bridesmaids were Claudia 
Miranda, Kathy Smith, Terry 
Sutter and Mrs. Robert H. 
Bryson. 

Gecrge F. Skinner was his 
scm's best maa Ushers were 
David Lefler, John Enrlght, 
Douglas Cary, Gecrge Sadowskl 
and Robert Bryson. 

The cxjuple will reside in 
Virginia Beach. 



WINSFELWWSHIP 

Nimrod Apis of Virgimj 
Beach has received a Thomas J. 
Watson Fellowship for 
independent, post-graduate 
study and travel abroad. 

Mr. Amis, a senior at 
Wesleyan University in 
Mlddletown. Ccmn., will use the 
fellowship for a research and 
creative writing project in 
Egypt. 



6t<^-/» 



C^H•^Cu•l 



BF \l I N SVI OSS 



Shampoo t S.I F'O'" $3.45 

Compl»i« f»«fmaf>«n» V^ovw .....$6.95 to $19.95 

ftouK Fonci-Ton* Touch-up f^om $5 00 

lioux Frosting (Shompoo t S«t EKtro) $12.50 

jtalreut ■ $2.75 (Long Hair $3.50) 

No Appmntment Nece$iary - Jiut Come In 

HILLTOP 
DAILY - 8 'TIL 6:30 




DAILY -9 TIL 6 
THURS. - 9 TIL 9 



Silt Va. •Md« Mwd. 
mmmi 4t7-e7»t 



1734 E. 

U%m CrMk Rd. 

Nnrt t« Ztisftm 



MARY MCDONALD was 
named Girl of the Year recently 
by the local Beta Omega 
Chapter of Beta Sigma Phi, 
international social and service 
sorority. She was presented 
flowers and a' charm at the 
recent Founders Day bancjuet 
at Holiday Inn^cope. She is 
ou^oing president of the local 
chapter. 

A WINE TASTING party was 
held recently by first year 
French students in V>ki 
DeLano's French classes at 
Tidewater Community College 
Virginia Beach campus, 
Host^es were Joan Hamlin 
and Barbara Scalese. 
Approximately ^ students, plus 
instructc»rs and guests tried 12 
different wines and assorted 
French cheeses and desserts. 
Bill Hart, TCC Spanish 
Instructor, accompanied the 
students on piano while they 
sang French songs. 

Items may be submitted to Sun 
Dial by mail. Please mall your not- 
ice to Sun Dial. Virginia Beach Sun 
138 Rosemont Road, Virginia Beach 
Va. 23452. DeadUne Is noon Fri- 
day prior to tiie mek of public- 
ation. 



SENIOR CITIZENS will be 
honored by the General 
Hospital of Virginia Beach 
during National Hosptal Wedc 
which begins Sunday and ends 
May 18. Medicare benefits will 
be discussed Tuesday at 7:30 
p.m. at the hospital. All senior 
dtizens and other interested 
persons are invited to attend the 
infcrmation session. 



COMMENCEMENT exer- 
cises for Old Dominion 
Unlvo-slty's 1,955 graduating 
students will be Sunday at 8 p. m.. 
at Scope. Speaker will be Lewis 
W. Wd)b Jr.,, professor erf 
physics, who retires from the 
unlvorsity in June as {resident 
emmtus. 



MONTESSORI meUKXfe of 
chiMhood <aducaticm will be 
exfdored In a free workshop 
Monday at 7:30 p.m. at Thalia 
Ttlnlty Prrabyteriaa Church, 
m Thalia Road, sponsra-ed by 
the Prema Association of 
Virginia Beach. The workshop 
precedes a wedcly course to be 
held this monUi and next. Mcve 
litformaticm may be obtained 
from the Pr«na Association at 
426-2454. 




Send her the FTD 

Swed: Simisd" 

far Mothers Ctey 



SEND IT EARLY ... SO 
THERE'S NO CHANCE 
OF DISAPPOINTMENT. 



colorful hand paint- 
ed ceramic bucket 
filled with bright 
Spring flowers or 
plants wi^ fmh 
floww accent. It's 
a gift -with an Extra 
Touch™rti«'ll delight 
Inrac^ving-Wacan 
stnd it almost any- 
where the FTD way. 




SWEET SURPRISE, 
arrangsd 



liUP 



« 



428-2901 




VA. NAOi VA. 




Reli gion 



TlM Sun~Wwimsi^, May 8, 1974-Paga 11 



New Contact crisis counseling 




readies out to peopie in need 



People who have pnrfdems 
with their personal lives, such 
ai marital problems, proJdeins 
with children or with a, crisis 
such as a death in ttie famify, 
may nbt know where to turn for 
help. 

To fiU tMs need in the 
community, two local dMircfara 
are sponsoring a new crisis 
intervention and counseling 
telephone service called 
Contact. 

Contact openied last 
Wednesday at noon and is now 
opm 24 hours a day every day of 
the wed(. 

THE SERVICE is directed by 
the Rev. William C. "BiU" 
Hedrick, also director of 
Tidewater Counseling Services 
in Virginia Beach and former 
assistant pastor of First 
Presbyterian Church. 

First Presbyterian and 
Galilee Episcopal Church co- 
sponsor Contact as a joint 
project. Volunteers, drawn 
mainly from the two churches, 
each man the telephone lines 
about eight hours per month. 

The new telephone counseling 
service does not duplicate 
services of other so-called 
"iKitlines," such as the drug 
inf (MTnation service operated by 
Broken Needles or the crisis 
intervention service sponsored 
by the Virginia Beach Outreach 
Clinic. 

"I DON'T THINK we're 
duplicating tbeir services at 
all," Rev. Hedrick explained. 
"Most of the other hotlines are 
organized toward specific 
needs, such as a drug hotline or 
a rape hotline or a suicide 
hotline. We are a more general 
crisis intervention and 
counseling service, and we are 
more of an informational 



service." 

The 95 v(dunteers who handle 
the Contact phones each 
received 50 hours of trainii^ in 
theology, psychological 
counsding and r^erral servies. 
The volunteers have been 
receiving instruction on a 
regular basis since January. 

They learned how to deal wiQi 
psycholc^ical growUi and 
development, grief, the 
problems of adolescents and the 
aged, «noti(mal and mental 
disorders, plus receiving 
information mi basic counseling 
techniques and the various 
social services available in the 
community. 

STAFF MEMBERS of the 

Psychiatric Associates of 
Tidewater, the Tidewater 
Psychiatric Institute and the 
Atlantic Mental Hygiene Center 
donated their time to help train 
the volunteers. 

Although the Contact service 
is sponsored by churches, Rev. 
Hedrick said the volunteers do 
not use the service as an 
instrument to "evangelize or 



VOLUNTEERS NEEDED 

Volunteer workers are needed 
for Vacation Church School al 
Virginia Beach United 
Methodist Church. The school 
will be June 24-28. 

Workers are needed as 
teachers, musicians, craft 
instructors, recreation leaders, 
refreshment servers and 
teachers' aides. 

Volunteers are asked to call 
Sue Shepheard, children's 
coordinator, at 481-4108, or 
Dcmald Seefy at the church 
office, 428-7727. 



Symbol still lives 



^ An ornate old window at St. John's 
'I Church of Deliverance on Indian 
'. River Road contains the eight- 
spoked wheel, an ancient religious 



symbol used by Christians and 
Buddhists alike. (Sun photo by Rod 
Mann) 



Methodists help disaster victims 



^ Local United Methodist 

Churches have been asked. to 

•foin a nationwide appeal this 

\>eek to help (Usaster victims in 

Anica and this country. 

W The United Methodist Council 

ntf Bishops has set a goal (rf $2.5 

trillion to aid drouj^t-stricken 

areas of Africa and the central 

^nd southern portions (tf this 

country stuck recently .by 

tornadoes and floods. 

A sp(*esman fw Virginia 
Beach United Methodist Church 
said that most local Methodist 
churches will participate in the 
special appeal by asking a 
special offering Sunday or using 
communion offerings this week 
j^r next. 

The theme rf the special 
Ippealwillbe "Human Tragedy 
jlere — Human Tragedy 
1 There" 

; OFFICIALS OF THE United 

I Methodist Committee on Relief 

1<UMC0R), who will administer 

jie relirf funds, estimate that 

pome six million people in the 

ahel area of Africa are directly 

heatened with famine because 

f contimiing drmight A total of 

El million is being sought for the 

lection of Africa. 

Another $1.5 million is sought 

Ibff peqjle in Ohio, Kentudty, 

Fennessee and Alabama, which 



were hard hit by tornadoes and 
floods in early April. 

I 

Church officials said the first 
priority fw donations collected 
will be relief of human suffering 



and need in those states. 
A "second f»iority for the U.S. 
portion of the offering wiU be 
help in restoring church 
buildings damaged in 
tornadoes. 



Need help? Phone-In TV 

700 CLUB 

featuring 

Pat Robertson 

8 PM weeknights 





9 STRONq 

chuRcbES 





(VIAkE STRONq 



• • 



COMMUNITIES 







If you have just moved. 
It's time to &1\ your 
Welcome Wagon hMtess. 

Phone 340-2131 

If you are |nt«re(t«(l tn getting 
tilforiTMtion about Mln* a 
WMIcorrM Waflon Ho»tess, fill 
out the foUAfning coupon 




k 



Maitw: 

AdlWMS: 

Phone No.i ....«..^.«n— — . 

Mall to: Welcome Wa9on 

370S K*»9»* «• C*e'» 
iWa. ■A.M. 29492 



A THOUGHT -^ 

FOR mA 

TODAY 
MAY 8 J974 



By Rev. 

Harold llulion 

Minister, Kmmaniie! 

Tabernacle 

Church, UPC 



Hebrews 6-19 
Which hope we have as an 
anchor of the soul, both sure 
and stedfast, and which 

I entereth into that within the 

, wil. 

Acts 27, 30 
And as the shipmen were 
about to flee out of the ship, 
when they had let down the 
boat into the sea, under 
cokwr as though they would 
have cast anchors mit of the 
fweship. 

There are limes when 
sWi^ have to depend upon 
anclMTs let they be Ashed 
c^w) ra«*s and p«ish. 



immanuel Tabernacle 
Church-UPC 

157 Morrison Ave. 

(1 block off S. Lynnhwen Rd.) 
Rev. Harold HulionPastor 
Phone: 340-7333 



BAYLAKE UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 

4300 Shore Drive 
Va. Beach - 464-2423 

Byron S. Hallstead - 
Minister 

SUNDAY SERVICES 

Church Schocrf 9:30 KM. 
Mwning Wwihip 11:00 A.M. 
VISTORS ARE WELCOME. 



TIDEWATER CENTRAL 
CHURCH OF THE 
NAZARENE 

Rev. David Ho^in, Pi^r 

5514 ParltonenJ Ph. 497-8703 
Sunday School Hr. - 9:45 KM. 
Hour of Tiwmph 10:50 A.M. 
Junh^ouA, k AdMlt 
Pi«o^» - im P.M. 
Ikw rf Ja^irton - 7:00 P.M. 
Wedn^day MH-n^k 
l^MUt 7:30 P.M. 



ROCKCHUfiCH 

eWKonpivflkRd. Ph. 499-3727 

AHr^iiit Beadi 

Suntfay 

timday Scbgal f :4S A.M. 

MornMf Warthl^ 11 :M A.M. 

EvMkl* WertWp ;:M PM. 

TeeideY 

«tei^UjgM(*>H> 1*:M A.M. 

Mgrnina War«lil» lt:10 A.M. 
EvmM«.Werilito T;M P.M., 

Nursery AvatlaMc 
pAsrput 

Rtv JotinGimtmi Re».*nBOImei»ei 



1 



ST 



Anembly of God 



{Comet Va. B«ach Blvd. 
OceuiaMvd.) 

S. Beiler, Pattor 
428-5297 



FIRST CHURCH 
OF CHRIST 
SCICNTIST 
Virfinia Beach 
1341 Laskin Rd. 
Sunday 
Church Service 11:0« AM 
Sunday Schovl 11 :M AM 
Wednesday 

Tettimeny Meetint !:•• 
PM 

Christian Scientist 

Reading Room 

(same address as aMve) 

Monday thru Saturday 

11:Mam to3:S«PM 

Also Open Tuesday Evoninfl 

7:09 PM to t:MPM 

EvtryoAC it welceme to 
Study, Borrow, or B«y 
Autnorliod Christian 
Sciontitt LiMratwre and tho 
KHit James Version ol Mt 
•Hsio. 

Christian $cM«««t Monitor 
i« alto avallabta. 



BAf ANUEL BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

4750 Baxter Rd.Va. Beach 
Nitor: W. F. Grandst^r 
Phone: 497-4208 

Sunday School: 9:45 A.M. 

(AnAgM} 
PMdifa^ Service: 11:00 A.M. 
Evmi^ PieacMiV 7:00 P.M. 

WMaeadw 7:30 P.M. 
PuyaAMfeStB^ 
Vfriod YoiiA Activfties 



WELCmiE TO KKHIWIP 

ANDwnKEsswrm 

ST. MARK A.M.E. 

CNURCN 

i. AitoB Bvtts, Minhiter 
17«Po^f«Ild.VH|inla 

BeMh,Va. 

Si^ f^om 428-13% 

OnmA School - 9:30 A.M. 

nMMV«*^ll:W)A.M.| 

W^Mdi^ • i.m P.M. 

1^ l^a^ii^ MWitrv 



proselytize." The volunteers 
are drawn from a theolc^ical 
background, he said, so they 
recognize the importance of 
dealing with peqile "humanly, 
tenderly and with 

understanding." 

In 90 per cent of the calls 
Contact receives, he said there 
is no religious dialogue at all. 

None of the vohintea^ is paid. 
Rev. Hedrick, as director, is 
paid for his services. "Contact 
buys my services through 
Tidewater Counseling Services, 
which is heavily supported by 
First Presbyterian Church (rf 
Virginia Beach and Norfolk 
Presbyterian Church," he said. 

Tidewater Counseling 
Services is located across the 
street from First Presbyterian 
Church at 303 36th St. 

REV. HEDRICK HAS a 

masters degree in theology with 
150 hours of supervision and 



counseling studlCB. 

The two churches have been 
wcrking on ratablishing Contact 
since lastsummer. A member of 
Galilee Episcopal Church 
l»>ought back the Contact idea 
from Huntington, W. Va., where 
she had been visiting frioids 
who worked for another Contact 
service there. 

The local Contact is one of 85 
divisions of Contact U.S.A. 
located throughouf the country. 
Another Contact is on the 
Peninsula. 

Rev. Hedrick said that most 
of the calls Contact has received 
so far have been of a serious 
nature. The Contact staff has 
had no problems with crank or 
frivolous calls. 

In the first two days of 
operation, Contact received 15 
calls, some of which were 
congratulatory messages team 
other Contact centers in the 
country. 



THE TWO CHURCHES aife 

now trying to publiciM Contict 
throu^ the news me^ and by 
word of mouth throu^ ttw 
church members. ContMt {dam 
to wect billboards throughout 
Virginia Beach this suramer 
and has placed informatioR in 
Beach hotels and motels. It alao 
has [daced stickers with tte 
Contact telephone mimber on 
pubUc telephones. 

iUthmigh Contact is Intended 
primarily to serve reaidenli of 
Virginia Beach, vohjntewrs wiU 
accqit calls from anyone, Rev. 
Hedrick said. 

Contact is unique in that it ii • 
ministry program of the 
churches, he said. "It is two 
churches hryii^ to reach out to 
the community and ti^iiV to 
answer some of the needa 
there." 

The Contact telephime 
number is 4284110. 












NEWSPAPER 

CARRIER BOYS 
AND GIRLS 

MUST BE 12 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER 
If you would llki to sarnixtri 
money and live In any of the 
areas listed below, call 
486-3430, Monday thru Friday 

THESE ARE THE AREAS 
WHERE CARRIERS 
ARE HEEDED 



AVALON TERRACE 
PINEWOOD GARDEHS 
GATEWOOD PARK 
GREAT NECK VILLAGE 
REGENCY APTS. * 
BELLAMY MANOR 
WOODHURST 

THALIA GARDEN APTS. 



72iid ST. AREA 
^ PCEANFRONT) 

CARDINAL ESTATES 

S^th STREET AREA 

WASHI14GTON SOUARi 

LYNNWOOD 

CAROLANNE FARMS 

CHANTICLIAR APTS. 

KINGS ARMS APTS. 

GREAT NECK MANOR 



Call today and start aamlng that axtm monay right nowl 
4M-3430 Circulation 



•rnamm 



Religion Page Sponsors 



PRICE'S 

INCORPORATED 

BRAND NAME 

Appliances 

7V Starao 




ASPHALT 

ROADS 

& 

MATERIALS 

Phone - 497-3591 



1>RINCESS ANNE 
EQUIPMENT CORP. 
504 S. Military Hwy. 

Virginia Baacli, Va. 
Pliona 420-1 MO 

John Daara iqulpmant 



CONTRACTORS 
PAVING CO. INC. 

3779 Bonn^ Road 
Phone - 340-1161 



ACH 2P* 



BANK 

OF VIRGINIA BEACH 

Offices Throughout Virginia Beach 

425-5077 
First In Fraa Mhecking 
Firsf In Saturday Banking 



THERE IS A 
DIFFBRCNCE 

TRY 

Beach Ford 



KEMPSVILLE 
PHARMACY 

52^ PRINSESS ANNE RD. 

VIRGINIA mm, Vll^MM 



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V I 



I 




iiiirti.i,.L -^it^mm 



wm 



Pt9» la-TTt* Sun-Wadntsday, May 8, 197 




WACs 
take to 
the field 



BfftMUkl^ 



i 



Some 20 WACs (Women's Army Corps) made 
history this week by participating in field exercises 
with some 1700 men at Ft. Story. This was ttie first 
time that WACs had participated with men in a 
field training exercise at the Army post. They are 
members of the 7th Transportation Group from Ft. 

Eustis. 

2nd Lt. Sandra "Sandy" L. Salisbury and Pvt. 
Roseann A. Meehan said they encountered no 
personal jwoblems in being thrown together with 
men under field conditions. They faced conditions 
identical to those of the men, living in smaU pup 
tents, eating the same food and sharing respon- 
sibilities normally faced by men of an Army unit in 
the field. 
Lt. Salisbury. 27, of Montana is the 7th Group 
Movements Oificer and is the first WAC officw 
assigned to an administrative position in a troop 
field unit of this type. She is responsible for 
assuring the group's readiness for depl^ymoit. She 
was commissioned last November after completing 
Officer Candidate School (OCS). She previously 
served seven years in the Army's enlisted ranks. 

LT. SALISBURY SAYS she has had only minor 
difficulties in stepping into a man's environment. 
She said, "Most people accept it. A few men will not 
accept the fact that a woman of higher rank is their 
boss and will tell them how things will be done." 
She added, however, these were a minority. 
She says she is undecided about her future plans 
to stay in military service and that her decision 
"will depend on how much I can contribute." 

Pvt. Meehan, 20, of Minnesota leaves no doubt in 
your mind she is cmtent with her life in the Army. 
Despite being roused from sleep for an interview at 
the Old of her shift of duty, she was all smiles as she 
left the shelter of her tent. She carried on a light- 
hearted conversatitm as she stumbled drowsily 
through a light rainfall, holding her helmet in place 
with one hand and striving to lace up her Army 
boots with the other. 

PVT. MEEHAN HAS been in the WACs Ux eight 
months and attached to the 7th Groiq) fra- three 
monUis. Her duty assignment is a teletype 
operator. 

atUi^ in the damp shelter of an exovise um- 
pire's tent, she enthusiastically described her life in 
the field by sayti^* "It's fun. Even tte 'C-RatioiaV 
are c^y. Ifs interesting, but it is a little cold." 
Then with a twinkle in her eye she confessed, "I 
guess I really iMrefer my barracks to my tent." 

The reception she received when she arrived at 
the camp site left no doubt in her mind about beii« 
accepted by the men. Pvt. Meehan said, "Vl^ our 
buck arrived the men pulled iq) the b«:k cover. 
When they saw WACs in the truck they said, 'H^, 
this is great'." She ad(ted, "The men baby us at 
times tryii^ to do things for us. They keep teasing 
us about snakes out here, but I haven't seen any 
yet." 

The 7th Transportation Group was undergoing 
training in the offloading (rf ships and transporting 
cargo asliore in amphibious carft, in a simidated 
overseas operation. 



Pollution control 
workshop opens 



ON naXON TRANSCRIPTS 

Whitehurst backs panel decision 



Byau:siNEX 

8Hn Witbingtoii BarMu 

WASHINGTON - Rep. 
William Wtdtthurst (R-Va.) has 
said he backs the House 
Judiciary Cimunittee's decision 
that the President's submteion 
of eittted tranaaipts did aot 
coR4>ly with die coounittee't 
stdqmena of Watergate tapn. 

"I hope the President lees fit 
to com]^ wiOi the committee," 
Rep. Whitehurst said. "I think 
he should go ahead and make 
the tapes availaMe in son^e 
acceptable way, (ht else there 
should be a compromise 
between him aiul the 
committee." 



The latest in p<dluti<Hi control 
equipment will be exhiljited 
during the Commonwealth 
Pollution Contnd Woitshcp and 
Exha>its today and Thursday at 
the Cavalier Oceanfront 

Keynote speaker for the 
fourth annual event wU be 
Maurice B. Rowe, state 
secretary of administration and 
the senior mmnber of Gov. Mills 
Godwin's cabinet 

Mr. Rowe will spealt on 
"Promotlflg Ene^ Resources 
and Environmental Quality." 
Other speakers will address the 
expected SO petti^pants on the 



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nnnnnnnn nnnn 

nnnn nnnnnn 

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QQDQ QdDQQQQQ 
ODD aDOQU ODQ 

DoaaQQUEJ yuuu 
OQQQ uuuum 

DDQQQO QDUQ | 
OODO OaOBDQDQ 
QDDD ODIDD DGG 
0000 QDDC] DQy 



Solution to puzida on page 4 



BOZO'S BIG 

TOP 



The President and Uie 
Judiciary Committee should 
work In bannoi^ with each 
other, he said. 

"Certain things s^rinrised me 
about the \xame^B^," Rep. 
WMtehunt said. "For example, 
I was sarprised to bear the 
President comridered paying 
idadiniail to Howard Hunt. 
From my initial reading <A the 
b-anscripts, it seems the 
President was realty in the dark 
about the a tot of fliingi." 

REP. WHITEHUR8T also 
said voke Uifkctipn aod tone 
sometimes place a diftereiA 
odoration on a diatogue ten 



wouU c<Hne across in a printed 
version. For this reasoi^ he 
said, it is tanportant Uiat "die 
proper persons" on the 
Judiciary Committee hear the 
tapra. 

If the Judiciary Conmittce 
shouU say it needs «qiert8 to 
hear Vt» tapes. Rep. WUt^unrt 
saidhe wouM bade that request. 
He added tint to have all 
conunittee members hear the 
tapes would present a 
medianical problem, but that he 
will back the committee in Its 
dedsion. 

Rep. Whit^urst said that, in 



TCC 
prof 

wins 
award 



Donald Woodard, 32, an 
administrator at the Virghiia 
Peach campus of Tidewater 
Community College (TCC), was 
awarded an Honorary Life 
Memborship in the Vtarginia 
Congress of Parente and 
Teachers last week. 

Mr. Woodard recdved the 
award during the annual 
meeting fA the Tidewater 
District of PTAs at Plaza Juidor 
High School. The district 
organization includes PTAs of 
six area cities and counties. 

Approximately 400 
representetives <rf dhitrict, 
regional and local PTAs 
attmided the dinner meeting, in 
addition to area super- 
intendents of schools, 
school principals, assistent 
principals and local PTa 
members. 

Robert Shaver, pr^ident of 
the Virginia Congress of 
Parents and Teachers, 
acMressed the group on the 
theme of "Expandhig Bridges 
Threu^ Communication and 



Member^p." He strewed the 
importance of PTAs and Uieb: 
concern for the welfare of 
diildren 

MR. SHAVER IS an associate 
professor at Danville 
Community College. 

Mr. Woodard, a Virginia 
Beach resklent, has saved as 
chairman of the mathonatics 
and natural sciences division of 
the TCC Beach campus since 
July. He is a farmer teacher in 
the Norfolk public school system 
and a former principal and 
assistant principal ih various 
Chesapeake public schoob. 

He helped organise foiir new 
PTAs in Qiesapeake and is a 
former committee chaiitnan for 
the NorfcOc and Oiesapeake 
PTA councils. 

He also is a three-year 
memt>er of the board of 
managers and former 
committee chairman of the 
Virginia Congress of Parents 
and Teachers. 



^ew of the fact he may have to 
vote on the Impeachment 
questkm, he wanted te make it 
clear that he Js reso-ving 
^dgraeat on that question. 

Immediately after the 
Presidmt tarned over 
transcripto to tlw Judieifry 
Committee, Rep. WUtdiurst 
called hb action "a mi^or stq> 
forward in gettii^ tlw trutii 
out." He warned, however, 
that it wouU be a mistake for 
ttie PfMldent to get UmaeU "on 
a collision coivae" with the 
House or the Judiciary 
C<»nmittee. He also expressed 
di8b(^ef that the Presi<teit was 
not yet "out of the woods." 

Infoimalion 
session set 
for seniors 

Senior dtizNis suffering from 
the frequently-encountered 
malady known as "govenmient- 
ese" are invited to get help at a 
special information session 
Tuesday ,at the General 
Hosi^tal of Viifhiia Beadi. 

A hoB{^l representative will 
be available at 7:30 p.m. in the 
hospitaPs north wing lounge to 
help senior citizens having 
problems with Medicare or 
other federal health pn^ams. 

The month of May has been 
set aside as a time to recognize 
senior citizens, and the wMk of 
Sunday through May 18 has 
bera designated at National 
Hoqtital Wedc. 

The General Hospital of 
Virginia Beach is at 1080 First 
Cotonial Road. 



PoUoe charge 

hcalathMe 
whh burglary 

Leroy J. Baxter Jr., 18, 
according to police, was 
charged with burglary Friday 
momtog during a break-in at 
the GEX Department Store on 
Virginia Beach Boulevard. 

Mr. Baxter, Featherstone 
Court, is the hdder of athletic 
letters in football and track and 
f ieki competion at Bayside High 
School where he is scheduled to 
be graduated iff' Jtme. ■ 

Investigators said Mr. Baxter 
was apprehended shortly after 
midnight carrying two bottles of 
wine from the food department 
of the ' store. He was 
apprehended by officer J.V. 
Johnsm who responded to a 
silent burglar aUrm alert. 
Ofl^xr Jdmson said a rolling 
door on the side of tlw building 
had been raised about two feet 
in Uie air to gain entrance to the 
buikii!«. 

During his preliminary 
hearing Friday in General 
District Court, Mr. Baxter was 
placed under $i,O00 bond 
pending further legal 
proceedings scheduled for June 
3.- 



Teacher excliange ends 



Five Virginia Beach social 
studies teachers are 
participating with teachers 
from Wibningttm, Del, in an 
exchange teaching program. 

The four^day teaching 
exchange which ends ThursAiy 
brings five teachers from 
WUmuigton to Virginia Beach 
secondary schools in a program 



originating at a National 
Science Foundation course on 
new social studies. The course 
was held at the University of 
Minnesota in August. 

The five Beach teachers ai-e 
Betty Lou Whitford, Patsy 
Ferebee and Gary Miller of 
Kempsville Hi|^ School; Ed 
Browder of BaysideHigh School 



He calls police, 
then is arrested 



Police say they charged 
David L. Alley, 21, with 
manufactoring marijuana, a 
felony, and possession Of 
marijuana Thursday night 
while investigatir^ a reported 
burglary at bis 24th Street 
apartment. 

Detectives of the HIT (Hi^ 
Intensity Target) anti-burglary 
squad sakl ^ey were at Mr. 
Alley's apartment investigating 
the theft of some $900 worth of 
stereo equipment at the time. 

Inveatigators said they 



discovered ten marijuana 
plants growii^ in a ckiset of the 
apartment, in addition to 
ftoding approximately an ounce 
of marijuana. 

During a preliminary hearing 
Friday in General District 
Court, Mr. Alley was placed 
under $1,500 bond pending 
further court proceedings 
scheduled fw June 21. 

Police are still searching for 
th<»e responsible for the 
burglarizing of Mr. Alley's 
apartment 



and John McLaughlin of Plaza 
Junior High School. They are 
teachuig classes at Alexis I. 
DuPont High School in 
Wihningtoa 

Teadiing their classes here 
are WOmington teachers Ed 
Zippe, Robert Siere, Jerry 
Pedden, Jim Smith and Terry 
Hammond. 

Search on 

forthleyes 

ofchinaware 

A search contiraies for thieves 
who took an estimated $1,000 
worth of cbinaware and 
antiques from a Chickasaw 
Road residence. 

Police quote Mary B. 
Goureas, 57, with saying the 
items were token from her 
garage where they had been 
stored in a large contoino-. 

The stolen items hicluded 
rarious iSeces of a chtaui dinner 
servtee, china ddls and small 
household items of antique 
vintoge. 



ROLL CALL 



same topk. Inchided will be a 
panel discussion m energy and 
oivironmentol pnAlems on a 
kical, stete and r^onal basis. 

The worksh<^ will 
emphasize the effecte of 
poUutitm control programs on 
the economic development of 
tocal dties. 

The workshop and exUUto 
are being heU to coi^unction 
with the first joint meettog of 
Virginia's air and water 
pollution control agendas, said 
worinhty director Fred M. 
Burnett m. 

• ^■■ 



WASHINGTON - Here's how 
area MmdMrs of Coivess 
wore recorded on major roll call 
votes April 25 through May 1. 

House 

\ 

LIVI PlTUt RESEARCH: Patswj, Ml 

Mr ani SI agalnW, an amendment to ban 
ttM tiM M national Sclanct Fovndatlon 
fund* Mr retaarcti on any live fatui tttat 
tiat baan dalivtrad, unleB tt«a rnaar ch l« 
to kaap tiM fatu* allva. 

ttia ban ««t atlacttad to an NSF 
aulhorliallen bill (H.R. Mm) tliat wat 
War panad and sant to ttM Sonata. 

smca tba NSF doa* net fund wch 
rasaarch, ttiebat liad no Mibstantlva atlact 
and MTvad inttaad •• a MtMo ot ttit tMuia 
raaolullen. 

Tiia ban daflnat a llva f atvt a* ona twtioaa 
haart atHI baatt. 

Supportart arguad tor putting limits on 
doctori wtw caiMuct rateardi on fatuta* 
that ara tadmlcally but not HltrMly daad. 
Rap. Lawrtnca Hogan (RMd.) tald, "Wa 
mm turn avary opportunity to «Np ttia 
attack on ttta value and dignity of each 
human balng." 

Opponanlt arguad tlwt fetal reiaarcti 
ottm provMat valuaMa information on 
dMaataa tbai plague thanewly«ni. Ra^. 
J«na« Symington (D-Me) tald tba b«i 
"maiy ««rtM Ma preapacta Mr ba«»r 
madlcbia and ... eonatrain <«M doctor from 
lll(yleia«( 
t. Tfwniat 
SamirftaM iOV, Robert Daniel (R-4), 
W.C. Oanial (D-S), CaitfMU Mlar (R-4>. 
KannoM RoblMon (R-71, MMrd.ftrrlt 
(R4> and Joel ■raybNt (R-W) voted 
"yea." 

Rape. William WMtaburet (R-» and 
Wllll«n Wamplar (R-W «M net *0M. 

UNDEROROUNO NUCLEAR 
TISTIIM: Raiadid, Wg Mr Wd »7 
tie cut S< million in 



appropriating Sll Mlllon for energy 
reiearch. The Ull now goo* to the Senate. 

The amandment to halt planning Mr 
future Maatf would have left f37S,000 in ttM 
bill Mr evaluating tetta already staged. 

Suppertan argued Mr full cvaluallonot 
patt laM before planning future blaits. 
Rep. Frank Evans (D-Oto) cautioned 
agalnti "the penibility of contamination" 
of ra^lOrado't llmllad water supply. Rep. 
Tano Roncalto (D-Wym.) said Congress 
should not find a program that "remains 
unniccaattul in virutally all of Its 



hi* aWliff to save live* te come.' 
Rap*. Thomas Oewnmg (0-1). CMvM 



Opponents argued thet the money Is for 
planning, not oxpMaiont, and that cutting 
back the fund* would llnolta the nation's 
energy optton*. Rap. Joe Evin* (0-Tenn.) 
said "we must develop thh technology for 
the futire, m the evoni it Is needed." 

Oowmg. vniltatiur*t, Satterfield, Robert 
0«iM, W.C. Daniel, Butler, Roblraon. 
Parrls, Wampter and Broyhlll voted 
"nay." ^ 

AIR POLLUTION: Rejected, iMMr and 
HI against, an amendment to limit 
requirements Mr automobile *ml*»lon 
control devices to cars sold In 13 selected 
metropolitai arees. In ra)ectlng the 
amendment, the tMute voted to require 
such devices nationwide. 

The a me n dment was ottered M H.R. 
143M, an energy bill dealing with 
gathering Inlormat ion on energy supplies, 
authorlihig greater ine of coal aid 
adiutting certain air pelkrtlon control 
•^andwd*. jj 

Here are the 13 mtM whore emiuion 
device* would have bean requlrtd: 

Phoonlx-Tuscon, Los Angeles, San 
Francisco, SacramenM Valley, San Diego, 
San Joaquin Vatley, Hartford-New Haven. 
Springfield, National Capital, Mtlmore, 
New York City, Philadelphia, Chicago mO 



Atomic Energy CamnMMn funds that are 
aarmarlad Itr planning Mbtarranaan 
atomic Haat* M ItM Itocky mtrnt^m. 

The AEC htpea such Meet* wilt reloese 
trapped nalaral gM. 

TtMt w t Oe wr e partatM.R. i«M4, a bill 



Supporters vgued that emMSMn control 
dovlcas waste gaeetkM and Mould only be 
required wfMrealriiitf hit Ian I* *»leu*.R*p. 
John Jarmvi (D^Okla) said, "I see no 
reeton . . . M penelin every driver In the 
country becauae at the 13 areas with air 
quality pro blems ." 

Oppixient* argued ttiM a dual-tysMm 
would be In atte e t l ve and would leopradite 



the long-term goal of air quality. Rep. Paul 
Rogers IDFIa) argued against taking "a 
step backwards" and said, "We have lust 
so much clean air . . . we know wfu( In* 
been happening" M It. 

Downing, Whitehurst, Satterfield, 
Robert Daniel, W.C. Daniel, Butler, 
Robinson, Wampler and Broyhlll veled 
"yea." 

Parrls answered "present", but dW not 
vote. 

SENATE 

NO-FAULT INSURANCE: Passed, 53 

tor and 42 against, a bill to establish a 
nationwide, unlMrm system of no-fault 
Insurance. "No-fault" maon* that parties 
need not go M court to collect damages, 
because Insurance companies wlH pay 
benefits regardlaa* of who caused the 
accidant. 

The bill (S. 3S4), however, Mava* open 
the option of going to court whan serious 
damages occur, such MP^death, 
dis mem be r ment « lo** of more th^ W 
day* wrfrk. «' 

The Wll give* stages the options of 
adopting (1) a state no^faUt plan that 
meats minimum federal guldelines,' (2) a 
state plan mat goa* beyond the federal 
minimum, or (3) a more-ttrlngent tedaral 
no.lault plan. 

Supporter* argued that cutting down 
court battles will reduce ttw nalioitwMe 
coal* Of auM Imvance by SI billion per 
yaer, a saving* ^ be paHod on to 
comumert through lower premiums. 

Opponent* jrguad that restricting caurt- 
accet* will rewilt la poor quality, 
autameMIe ln»ur*nce. They else tald the 
federal government can not Mrcattalet to 
adept no-MUt insuranc* plan*. 

CoMumer groups, labor wiion* and 
many large msurwee cempanle* lalAled 
tor the bIH. Tbe Admlnletratlon, iIm 
American Trial Lawyers Aa»oelatMn and 
some large Mnranca companies lobbied 
agrinal H. it now goes to the House. 

sen*. Marry Byrd (i) and William Scott 
IR) 



Inturance bill amendment to give 
motorists the optton of Insuring their 
aulomoblie-relatcd health risks through an 
automobile Insurance policy or a group 
haallh policy, whichever is cheaper. 

The amendmeirt changed language In 
the no-Mult bill that had made automobile 
inaurancetheprimarynurce for coverage 
agtfntt medical coal* that raault from an 
accident. 

The no-Mult bill Will require motoriats to 
omen In auto Irauranca plans. In 
approving the amendment, ttM Senate 
voted M remove the potential dupllcatloit 
of molerW* with group health policia* alio 
baWg racniirad to carry auto Inauranc* for 
heellh ri*k*. 

Person* not enrolled In group poltcie* 
will not be given the option. 

Supporter* argued that the amendment 
will torce competition between auto 
inturers and group hMith insurers, thus 
lowering premiums. 

O p p o w a n t i argued that the amendment 
ditcrlmlnales against person* who do not 
have group health Inturance. They said 
thM the non-motoring piAllc will -pay 
higher group health rate* to tubtidlze 
"competitive" rates offered M lure 
molorlsis into group insurance. 

Byrd and Scott voted "nay." 



2^ 



IKMUI 



■\ 



2:30 PM 



TK>FILO C. MASCARfNAS, JR., M.D. 

AflAoifviMf fm op#nin0 ef nn etfi^ 

rer 7m AtocIpm Or 

INTE»4Al MEDICINE 

KM0ROKE 3, SINTE 144 

2W p>wiPfofc< Fork Orncat 

Corasr of tnMpwinnQB MWEvwd a VlffiiMa Mocn leuMvofd 

VBtGINIA WUiG{, VIRGINIA 23462 



OFFICE HOURSt 



TEVNONEi 
420-IQ2A 



euTTINO NO-FAULT: Raleeted, JJ 
for «id «1 again*, an amendnMrt gutting 
the comptttgry tortire* at the ne-feult 

instr-tcie W by gHrtiw •«• "*«'»^ * 
contlnulBg |»e»ei* •uloliwurence 



The amen*nent would heve Wuck TWM 
III, wftKh I* da«»n*d to goad r ^^t 
itMe* Into enacting ne-teult plan*. Waje* 
that da nal xtilngiy yect ewe g tbe Wrrt 
twei»lon» rg t il g< aWva» « iH ^toreed 

to adept ttie thW a^lwi - «»»• «rtn«wt 
Titte III tederat plan. 

in arguing tv the amenamei*. Sen. 
jetae »l*i» (B-N.C.) »1d ttM ^ ^ » 
■ un w ii a mvwien etMe^gfegiWvwf "«• 
itatefc" Rdmeirtmi Ibe cen»ul*ory 
laaluree ef «m bm, ha added, weidd 
re*or»« iherlghlol «et*» to enperlment 
wIM iHMer eauwe mauraw ee pMM. " 

PhKto wt <B4Mail *»t* *• "•SS 
Ti«e III "Cangrw* weuld «» *"*tH B» 
leglslatloM wtileh would ettPi!»i«» 
noRibig aid would ragrtre ne *iW to * 



ouM. imuaAwcE covaaA»«i 
ig»^«n» •«►•*» 



NOTICE 

Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the 
Council of the City of Virginia 
Beach will be heM in the 
Council Chambers <* fhe 
Administration Building, 
City Hall, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, on Monday, AAay M, 
W4, at 2:00 P.M. at which 
,tlme the following ap- 
plications will be heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICA- 
TION: 

KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH 

1. Petition of Fred D. and 
Hattie G. Holloway for a 

CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICA- 
TION from R-S 
Residential District to ui 
Office District on certain 
pro^grtv bagiiming at a point 
aSOfeatRfwreor MnsWastof 
Edwin Drive, running a 
distance of 100 f««t along the 
South side of Holland Road, 
ruimino a distance of 2M.S» 
feet alono the Eastern 
IHToperty line, running a 
Mtanee of I00.r7 feat along 
WW loiMwm pnfmtf line 



and running a distant* of 
212.W feet along ttte Western 
property line. SaW parca^ls 
known as Lot B.Subdlvlslon 
of Tract*}, A.W. Cornick and 
contains 0.5 acre more or 
less. (Holland Terrace- 
Larkspur Areas). KEMP- 
SVILLE BOROUGH. 

2. Petition of Robert and 
AAary ReW for a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-5 
Residential District to 0-1 
Office District on certain 
property beginning at a point 
750 feet more or \tia West of 
Edwin Drive, running a 
distance of 100 feet along fhe 
South side of Holland Road, 
running a distance of 212.92 
feel along the Eastern 
property line, running a 
distance of 100.97 feet along 
the Southern property line 
and running a distance of 
196.96 leet along the Western 
property line. Said parcel is 
known as Lot C, Subdivision 
of Tract 43, A,W. Comick and 
contains 0.i acre more or 
less. (Holland Terrace- 
Larkspur Areas). KEMP 
SVILLE BOROUGH. 

3. Petitioii of Roy A. and 
El«in D. ReW for a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-5 
Residential District, to 0-1 
Office District on certain 
property beginning at a point 
850 feel more or less West of 
Edwin Drive, running a 
distance of 100 feet along the 
South side of Hlolland Road, 
running a distance of 198.96 
leet along the Eastern 
property line, 'running a 
distance of 100.^7 feet along 
the Southern property line 
and running a dlifance of 185 
feel along the Western 
property line, siild parcel is 
known as Lot D*, Subdivision 
of Tract 43, A.W. Cornick and 
contains 0.45 acfe more or 
less. (Holland Terrace- 
Larkspur Areas), KEMP- 
SVILLE BOROUGH. 

4. Petition of Cornell and 
Casahdra FreemaA, for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICA- 
TION from R-5 Residential 
District to 0-1 Office District 
on certain property begin- 
ning at a point 950 feet tnore 
or less West of Edwin 6f ive, 
running a distance of lioifeet 
along the Southsldeof Holland 
Road, running a distance of 
185 feel along the Eastern 
property line, running a 
distance of 111.07 4eet along 
the Southern property lirte 
and running a distance of 
169.65 feet long the Westen^ 
property line. Said parcel is 
known as Lot E, Suixilvision 
ol Tract 43, A.W. Cornick and 
contains 0.45 acre. (Holland 
Terrace Larkspur Areas). 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

5. Petition of Robert and 
Mildred O. Perry for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICA- 
TION from R-5 Residential 
District to 0-1 Office District 
on certain property begin- 
ning at a point 1060 feet more 
or less West of Edwin Drive, 
running a distance of 117 feet 
along the South side of 
Holland Road, running a 
distance of 169.65 feet along 
the Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 117.71 
leet along the Southern 
property line and running a 
distance of 162.8 feet along 
the Western property line. 
Said parcel is known as Lot 

F, Subdivision «f Tract 43, 
A.W. Cornick and contains 
0.45 acre more or less. 
(Holland Terrace-Larkspur , 
Areas) KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

6. Petitton of Clarence L. 
and Elaine B. Waike for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICA- 
TION from R-5 Residential 
District to 0-1 Office District 
xi certain property begin- 
ning at a point 1177 feet more 
or less West of Edwin Drive, 
running a distance of 120 feet 
along the South side of 
Holland Road, running a 
distance of 162.8 feet along 
the Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 120.16 
feet along the Southern 
pr;Dperty line and running a 
distance of 168.91 feet alotig 
the Western property line. 
Said parcel is known as Lot 

G, Subdivision of Tract 43, 
A.W. Cornick and contains 
0.45 acre. (Holland Terrace- 
Larkspur Areas). KEMP- 
SVILLE BOROUGH. 

7. Petition of Metro Center 
Associates for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B-2 
Community Business 
District to 0-1 OHice District 
on certain property located 
in the Southwest quadrant of 
the intersection of Cen- 
terville Turnpike and Indian 
River Road, running a 
distance of 483.66 feet along 

the South side of Indian River 
Road, running a distance of 
190.54 feet atong the West 

sideof Cent ervllle Turnpike, 
running a distance of 56/. /» 
feet along the Southern 
IM-operty line and running a 
distance of 271.88 feet along 
the Western property line. 
Said parcel contains 2.721 
acres. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department 
of Planning. (College Park- 
Level Green Areas). 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 
8. Petition of Metro 
Center Associates for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICA- 
TION from HI Hotel District 
to 0-1 Office District on 
certain property located in 
the Southwest quadrant of 
the Intersection of Cen- 
terville Turnpike and Indian 
River Road beginning at a 
point 190.54 feet South of 
Indian River Road and 
running a distance of 950 feet 
more or leas along the North 
skle of Cattterville Turnpike, 
running a distance of 500 feet 
alcMHl the Western property 
line, running a distance of 4S0 
leet more or less along the 
Northern property , and 
running a distance of 567.71 
feet along the Eastern 
property line. Said pM'cet 
cotttalns 9.9 acres. Plats with 
more dctalMd Irtfortnation 
are available In the 
Department of Planning. 
(C(ril«ge Park-Level Green 
Areas). KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

9. Petltton of Metro Centw 
Assoclatas for a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B-2 
Community Business 
Distrlci to 0-1 Office District 
on certain propwiv Wated 
in tite SouMwMtt mndrant of 
the mtaraactloB •♦ Can- 
tarvIM TMTipNw and Indiwt 
Rivw Road basliwkm at a 
point tut Mat WMtt of Indian 
n\vm Mad and nimrins a 
Mmm^ S4i «•* mw «■ 
laiaiMne Hw Mr«t stda ef 



ning a distance of 750 feet 
more or less along the ' * 
Northern, property Ihta and I 
ruming a distance iM sooted ' 
more or less alony the 
Western property Una, Said 
parcel Is trlan^^lar in shape 
and omtalie 2.5 acres. Plats 
with more dftalled in- 
formation are available in 
the Department of Plahning. 
(College Park-Level Green 
Areas). KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

10. Peitifion of Metro 
CaiMer Associates for a ^ 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICA 
TION from 1-1 Light 
Industrial District to p-2 
community Business 
District on certain property 
located in the Southaast 
quadrant of the intersection 
of Centerville Turnpike and 
Indian River Road beginning 
at a point 190 feet more or 
less South of Indian River 
Road, running a distance of 
2443 feet along the South and 
East sides of Centerville 
Turnpike, running a distance 
of 1389.^ feet along the 
Southern property line and 
running a distance of 1840.42 
feel along the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel Is 
triangular in shape and 
contains 36.780 acres. Plats 
with more detailed in- 
formation are available In 
the Department of Planning. 
(College Park-Level Green 
Areas). KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH 

11. Petition of A. Gordon 
Siephenson and Elizabeth S. 
Sills by Grover C. Wrighir 
Attorney, for a CHANGE OF ; 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-4 
Residential District to A-4 
Apartment District on 
certain property located on 
the Northwest corner of 
Hilltop Road (Linkhorn 
Drive) and Pacific Avenue, 
running a distance of 412.41 i 
teet along the West side of 
Pacific Avenue, running a 
distance of 411.93 feet along 
the North side of Hilltop 
Road (Linkhorn Drive) 
running a distance of 185.66 
leet along the Western 
property line atid running a 
distance of 1734lJ««ti along , 
the Northern property line. 
Said parcel contains 70,316 
square leet. (Princess Anne 
Country Club Area). 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. , 
City Clerk 

5-8,15.2-T 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
in the Clerk's OHice of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on fhe 30th 
day of April, 1974. 
Douglas c. Smarts Plaintiff, 
against 

Marie D. Smart, Defendant. 

ORDER OF 

PUBLICATION 

The obtect of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa Et 
Thoro to be later merged Into 
a divorce A Vinculo 
AAatrinfwnii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of desertion. 

^And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defetWIant is not a resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: 1434 McKean Street, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania f\ 
19145. 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 
A copy— Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS: 
CLERK 

By Sandra Hargrove D. 
Clerk. 

Brydges, Hammers & 
Hudgins 
1369 Laskin Rd. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 

5 8,15, 22, 29, 4-T 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
■ In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 30th 
day of April, 1974. 
Daniel Raymond Sabine, 
PlaintiH, 
against 

Nancy Carolyn Holt Sabine, 
Defendant. 

ORDER OP 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defetidant, upon the grounds 
of constructive desertion or 
two years separatkm without 
cohabitation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that due 
diligence lias been used by 
and on behalf of the plaintiff 
to ascertain in what county 
or corporation the defetidant 
is, without effect, the last 
known post office address 
being: 149 Waverly Drive, 
Virginia Beach, Va. 

II is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
neceeary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 
A copy— Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS: 
CLEIUC 

By: Sandra Hargrove D. 
Clerk. 

(k>ldblatt, Lipkin, Cohan, als 
Plaza One 
Norfolk, Va. 23510 

5-8,1S,l3^-4-T 

Commonwcaltli of Vtrglnia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 3rd 
day of AAay, 1974. 
Harry R. Harrelson, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Edna Thomas Harrelson, 
Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The oblact of Nils suit is fo 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
dafandant, upon the p-oimds 
af desertion. 

And an affidavit havMtg 
ba«n ffwda aiMt filed that the 
detafNtont Is mrt a rasidant (^ 
the State M Virghiia, the iMt 
known pest offtea addreu j 
beino: S Watt Mi Straat, 
Jadtaonvllla, FMrMa. 

i» la ordarad that she do 
ai^iMr Iwi^ Mflthta tan (W> 
dayc irffar due p(rt>llcatlon 
hereof, and do wfiat wiay be* 
n i e aaii r y to protect her 
intaroR In ftils suit. 
Aeopy— TeMa: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS: 
CLERN 

•y: Sandra Mivove D. 
Clark. 

Bri^gea, Hammwi h 
Hudilr* 
nw I iitfn M. 

va. 

M,U,a.ll«4.T 



^i*«i«tfl«MM* 



MAMatflMl 



^mmmmfmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm^m 



mp^ff^^^m^^^mn^i^ 



mrmm^'^m'- 



^ l \JKAi% ] 



INVITATION to MO 

BEACH. VIRGINIA 
ABAimbONEt) MOTOR 

vehtCUs program 

(OlNtRAtTFOR 

tiisrasiTidN 

OF SAME) 

The ^purpose of this in 
^ vitaliorT. lo bid is lo provide 
he City pi Virginia Beach, 
Virqinia» (City) with the 
ervicef' ' of a reliable in 
(fependcii' agency (Con 
rac'or/ lor Wr'ecking truck 
pickup, of motor vehicles 
flbandd^^ct on the streets and 
iiiher pjemtses pf the Citr, 
liauling and stoi^age of same, 
returning same to rightful 
claiman'fs after payrnent of 
due charge^ by claimants to 
C<iniracior, or sales of such 
vehicles fav the Contractor 
when no' rightfully claimed. 
All ot sut H activities shall be 
pur-^ued ', y" the City and the 
Contractor Unt^er City 
Ordihance No. 244 of 
Novenifaer 25, 196fi or as 
amendeil,' which is made a 
par' ol this advertisement by 
referencej; . 

Bid*; wilJ be received up to 
7:(X) P.AA. on May 17, 1974, in 
'he otfide of Purchasing 
Aqenl, ' ' Room 352 

AdniinistratiQn Building, 
v*unicipai Confer, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, for this 
program, at which time such 
hid- will be publicly opened 
and re»tt aldud. The City 
reserve" 'he right to waive 
any iMormaUties in the 
biddingv »and reserves the 
right to 'rte acceptance or 
I ejection ol a«^y or all bids or 
■i> nellbtiate a contract 
'•eemerf io be in ihe best 
ntere^' >>» the Gdy lor the 
perlorrriarce of this 
prograltt, 

Bid 'Form*; and more 
pertinent information con- 
cerning this program may be 
obtainetf by communicating 
with ihe'Wfice of Purchasing 
Aqen'. ' 

Carroll G. Cloogh 
Purchasing Agent 
Bid ItenrWo. 3023 

S-«, 1 1 

N6TICE 

This is to Motif y the public 
hat the Undersigned, trading 
a«; TH^ MOOSE TRAP will 
within' 'en dayS after 
publication dl this notice 
apply to the Virginia State 
AlcotwWc Beverage Control 
BnardJ^tar a Itsense to sell 
beer, iwJne and mixed 
beverages for on premises 
consumption. 
DONART, INC. - 
TA THE MOUSE TRAP 
1511 AKantic Ave. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 
A.E. Kaimus, Pres. 
Sondra Lea Oldakef 
WITNESS 
^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

^^^JOTtCEoT^^^ 
PM BUG HEARING 
Tiie Virginia Beach 
Planning Commisskm will 
hold « Public Hearing on 
Tuesday, AAay 14, 1974, at 
1:00 P.M. in the Council 
Chambers of the 

Administration Building, 
Princess Anne Courthouse, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia. 
The following applications 
will a0pear«n thevgente:' 
SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 

1. Variance to Section 
4.4 (d) fo the Subdivision 
Regulatkins, located West of 
Overland Road. ' 
DEFERRED 60 DAYS BY 
PLANNING COMMIKION 
ON AAARCH 12, W4: 

2. Petition of Ocean 
Island Inn, Inc., for a Ctwnge 
of Zoning District 
Classification from B-4 
Resort Commercial District 
to H-2 Resort Hotel District 
on certain property located 
at the Northeast Corner of 
Jade ■ Street and Page 
Aveftwc.runninga4i8tanceof 
422.43 feet along the North 
side of Page Avenue, running 
a distance of MO feet more or 
less along the Eastern 
property line, ruiuting a 
distance of S« feet more or 
less along the Northern 
property line (Chesapeake 
Bay) and running a distance 
of 533 feet more or less along 
the Western, property line. 
Said parcel attains 6.378 
acres (Lynnhaven Shores 
Area). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

3. Petition of W.W.D. 
Associates by Marsh and 
Basgier.lnc., for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
from R-3 Residential District 
to B-t Community Business 
District on certain property 
located on the South side of 
Shore Drive, beginning at a 
point 755 feet more or less 
West of Independence 
Boulevard, running a 
distance of 1472 feet along the 
Northern property line of 
which 718 feet is the Sooth 
side of Shore Drive, running 
a distance of 404 feet along 
the Eastern property line, 
runninfl a distance of 1700 
feet along the Southern 
property line and running a 
distarKe of 750 feet along the 
Western pnpcrty line. Said 
mrcel contains 13.31 acres. 
Plats with more detailed 
information are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
(Lake Shores-Little Creek 
Amphibious Base Areas). 
BAYSIOE BOROUGH. 

4. ^eittton «# WW. D. 
Associates by Marsh mi&y 
Basgier, Inc., for a Change of 
Zohlnf^strict Classification 
from *&-6-2 Community 
Business District to HI Hotel 
DIsfrlct on certahi property 
beginning at a point 385 feet 
more or less West of 
independence Boulevard and 
M7.34 feet South of Shore 
O-ive running a distance c^ 
141 feet along the Western 
property line, running a 
distance of 34t feet along the 
Sowthem property line «id 
running « distance of 137 feet 
alongi «te EMtem property 
line mnb running s distance ot 
tU M*t Btong the NMlhem 
^■opwly line. Said parc^ 
contafttt 0.7t acres. Plal» 
with more detailed in- 

L fcrnMrtlen are available *n 

^ the Oi|iM«nant of Planning. 

(Lake Shares-Little Creek 

Amphtblews Base Areas). 

BAYStOe WMtOUGH. '-r- 

5. IWItlon of W.W.D. 
Associates by Mm^ and 
•a^ler, im:« for a Ctonge of 
Zoning Disfrtet ci^if Ration 
from R 3 Residential Mstrlct 
to H-1 Hotel Dtolrlct on 
CMiain wiwerty begirw^ig at 
a prtn* S»fe^ nfwretor 1^ 
WMt of Independence 
■Bu tawrd , awl ^ feet more 
or MB Sewth of man Orhm, 
nN«rtnga^«M*«40fMl 
aleiv Wir WMIirw < prBiWt» 

f«« M^ 1M iwrt h w n 
pfopf t y IMS, limnint • 



dWmce of 40 feet along the 
Eastern |»^]perty line and 
running a distance ot 341 tact 
along 'the Nortttem property 
line. ShM psn^l (^ntalns OJI 
acres mere or lest. Plats 
with 'more detailed In- 
fornMtion are avaltaMe In 
the Dqgprtmmt of Plaiming. 
(Lake Shom-Llttle Crmk 
Amphibious BMe Areas). 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
DEFERRED 30 DAYS BY 
PLANNING COMMISSION 
ON APRIL % 1W4: 

6. Petition of R.L. Upton 
& Margaret I. Upton for a 
Chmge of Zonhig DIsh-lct 
Classlflilatlon from R-A 
Residential District to 0-1 
Office District on certain 
property located on the 
SoMfheast comer of South 
Palin Avenue and Bonney 
Road and 200 feet VMst of 
South Fir Avenue, rurtning a 
distance of 227.55 feet along 
ihe Northert) property line of 
Which 177.55 feet Is the South 
side Of Bonney Ro^d, running 
a distance of 394.1 feet ahxig 
the East side (rf South Palm 
Avenue, runnlfHi a distance 
of 187.9 teet along the 
Southern property line, and 
running a distance of 513.35 
feet along the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 1.9 acres. (Thalia 
Village-Southern Firs 
Areas). KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

REGULAR AGENDA 
Change of Zoning District 
Classifications: 

7. Petition of Oscar 
Lewis, Ctaudls Holiey and 
James E. Jefferson, Trustees 
of Washington Lodge, 139, for 
a Change of Zoning District 
Classification from R-6 
Residential bish-ict to 0-1 
Office District on certain 
property beginning ata point 
584.4 fee) North of Weldon 
Street (fprmerly Grace 
Street) between Frost Road 
and Eagleton Lane, running 
a distance of 82.2 feet along 
the East side of Eagleton 
Lane, running a distance of 
280 feet along the Northern 
property line, running a 
distance of 82.2 feet along 
the West side of Frost Road, 
and running a distance of 
280 feet along the Southern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 0.54 acres more or 
lets. (Gracetown- 
Feritresstown Areas). 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

8. Petition by resolution 
of the Council of the City of 
Virginia Beach for a Change 
of Zoning District 
Classification from 1-1 Ught 
Industrial District to AG-1 
Agricultural District on 
certain property beginning at 
a point 1333 feet more or less 
South of Adventure Trail and 
915 feet more or less West of 
London Bridge Road, run- 
ning a distance of 390 feet 
more or less along the 
Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 257.88 
feet along the Northern 
property line, running a 
distance of 371. K) feet along 
the Western property line 
and running a distance of 310 
feet more or less along the 
Southern property line. Said 
parcel is known as Parcel Y, 
Resubdivision of Lot 12 and 
Subdivision of Lot 13, London 
Bridge Gardens and contains 
2.5 acres more or less. 
(Nottingham Estates Area). 
LVNNHAVEtl BOROUGH. 

9. Petition of Kings Row, 
A Partnership, by Stanley A. 
Phillips, Attorney, for a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from A-1 
Apartment District to 0-1 
Office District on certain 
property beginning at a point 
146.60 feet North of. Virginia 
Beach Boulevard, running a 
distance of 276.60 feet along 
the East side of Little Neck 
Road, running a distance of 
430 feet along the Northern 
property line, running a 
distance of 382 feet along the 
Eastern property line and 
running a distance of 443 feet 
along the Southern property 
line. Said parcel contains 
3.247 acres. (Southern 
Terrace- Bel lehaven Area). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

10. Petition of Ruby 
Barco for a Change of Zoning 
Dish-ict Classificatton from 
R-7 Residential District to H- 
2 Resort Hotel District on 
certain property located on 
the Southeast corner of High 
Point Avenue and Arctic 
Avenue, running a distance 
of 109.7 feet along the South 
side of High Point Avenue, 
running a distance of 100.07 
feet along the East side of 
Arctic Avenue, running a 
distance of 196.71 feet along 
the Southern property line 
and running a distanc^of 100 
feet more or less amng the 
Eastern property iinb (Lake , 
Holly), said parcel istwoway 
as Lots 2, 4, 6, 7, and 8, Block 
10, Map of Shore Acres and 
contains 0.29 acre more or 
less. (Shadowlawn Heights- 
Shore Acres Areas). 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

11. Petition of Ruby C. 
Barco for a Change of Zoning 
Disfrlct Classification from 
R-7 Residential District fo H- 
2 Resort Hotel District on 
certain property beginning at 
a point 1050.07 feet East of 
Arctic Avwue, running a 
distance of 105.18 feet along 
the North dde of Winston 
Salem Avenue, running a 
distance of 193.29 feet atong 
the Eastern propwiy line, 
running a distwice of 10.15 
feet along the Northern 
property line and running a 
distance of 100 feet along the 
Western property line. Said 
parcel in kr»vm as Lots 1, 3, 
and 5, Btock 11, AAap of Shore 
Acres and contains 0.163 
acre. (Shadowlawn Heights- 
Shore Acres Ams). vir- 
gmia beach borough. 

1? petitlonof Rodney Louis 
Mills for a Change ot Zoning 
District Cla»iflcation from 
R.7 ResMentlal District to A- 
4 Apartment District on 
certain pn^erty beginning at 
a point 270 feet East of Baltic 
Avenue, running a distance 
of 90 feet along the South side 
of fth StrMt, . running a 
distwiceof m net atong the 
Eastern property line, 
runnifM) a distance of 90 feet 
along w» Southern pr^serty 
line wKl running a distance (tf 
100 feet atong the WeMern 
pri^erty line. Said parcel is 
known » Lots 12, 14. and 16, 
Block 14 Plat of Shadowlawn 
Heights and contains 9,000 
square feet. (Shadowlawn 
HeK^ts Area). VIRGINIA 
BEACH M)ROUGH. 

13. Petition oi J. Waltor 
BrM«ers tar a Oiange ol 
Zoning OistrM awsH leathm 
from R 7 ResWantM IXtlrict 
to A-4 ^^M^neN ty^y on 
certMi proper^ haglnnktg at 
a p^it W^iet ^^1 of Hnic 
AvenM aM rwinlin • 



which UO feet Is tiM South 
side of fiti Street, runnhig a 
distance of 20e feet atong the 
Eastern > property line, 
running a (flstanc^ of 140 toet 
atong the Norlh side of 
Maryland Avenue and 
ruming a dIstaiKe of aoo feet 
along the Western property 
line. Said parcel is known as 
L^ U, 17, 18, W, », 21, 13. 
23, 24, 25, », 27, 28, and 29, 
Block 16, Plat of Shadowlawn 
Heights and contains tiJK 
Kpiare feet. (Sha de n da w n 
Heights Area). VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

14. Petition of Julia, 
Harriet and Katrine de Witt 
for a Change of loning 
District Classlficatkin from 
B-4 Resort Commercial 
Dishrict to H-2 Resort Hotel 
District on certain property 
touted on the East side of 
Pacific Avenue extending 
between 12th Sfreet and 13th 
Street, running a distance of 
330 feet along the East sMeof 
Pacific Avenue, running a' 
distance of 200 feet atong the 
South side of 13th Street, 
running a distance of 330 feet 
along the Eastern property 
line, running a distance of 300 
feet atong the Southern 
property line of which 100 
feet is the Norlh side of 12th 
Street. Said parcel contains 
1.14 acres. VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

15. Petition of Virginia 
(Gateway, Inc., for a Change 
of Zoning Oistrlct 
Classification from A-l 
Apartment District to A-4 
Apartment District on 
certain property located at 
the Southeast corner of 18th 
Street and Parks Avenue, 
running a distance of 300 feet 
along the South side of 18th 
Street, runnlno a distance of 
150f erelong the East side of 
Parks Avenue, running a 
distance of 300 feet along the 
Southern property line and 
running a distance of 150 feet 
along the Eastern property 
line. Said parcel contains 1 
acre more or less. VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

16. Petition of Trent 
Berkshire Development 
Corp„for a Changeof Zoning 
District Classification from 
R-1 Residential District to R- 
3 Residential District on 
certain property located at 
the Northwest corner of Five 
Points Road and Inlynnvlew 
Road, running a distance of 
1235 feet more or less along 
the North side of Inlynnvlew 
Road, running a distance of 
1220 feet more or less along 
the Eastern property line of 
which 610 feet Is the West 
side of Five Points Road, 
running a dlstiance of 1260 
feet more or less along the 
Northern property line and 
running a distance of 1045 
feet along the Western 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 22 acres more or 
less. (Southern Points- 
Trantwood Shores Areas). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

17. Petition of L-O-J 
Associates. A General 
Partnership, for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
from A-l Apartment District 
to B-2 Community Business 
District on certain property 
beginning at a point 800 feet 
more or less West of Hutton 
Lane, and 170 feet more or 
less North of Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, running a 
distance of 24S.8 feet along 
the Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 212.5 
feet along the Northern 
property line and running a 
distance of 314 feet along the 
Western property line and 
running a distance of 200 feet 
along the Southern property 
tine. Said parcel contains 1.2 
acres more or less. (Eureka 
Park-London Bridge Areas). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

18. Petition of Century 
Developers .for a Change of 
Zoning District Classificatton 
from R-5 Residential District 
to A-2 Apartment District on 
certain property located on 
the Southwest corner of Old 
Harris Lane and Pleasure 
House Road, running a 
distance of 400 feet along the 
South side of Old Harris 
Lane, running a distance of 
175.98 feet along the Eastern 
property line of which 82.30 
feet is the West side of 
Pleasure House Road, 
running a distance of 417 feet 
more or less along the 
Southern property line, and 
running a distance of 158 feet 
along the Western property 
line. Said parcel contains 
1.457 acres. (Bradford 
Terrace Area). BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

19. Petition of A.T. Taylor 
Estate for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
from 1-2 Heavy industrial 
District to AG-i Agricultural 
District on certain property 
beginning at a point 2885 feet 
more or less Northeast of 
London Bridge Road, run- 
ning a distartce of 818 feet 
more or less along the West 
side of Harpers Road, run 
ning a distance of 951 feet 
along the ftorthem property 
line(U.S. Naval Air Station), 
running a distance of 1445 
teet more or less along the 
Eastern property line. Said 
parcel contains 11 acres 
more or less. (Oceana Navial 
Air Statton Area). PRIN- 
CESS ANNE BOROUGH. 
Condittonal Use Permits; 

20. Ap^licatton of Paul N. 
Howard Co., for a Con- 
ditional Use Permit to 
operate a contractors' 
storage yard fw a period of 
two years on certain 
property located on the South 
side ot Bow C i e eKl ftulevard 
betwwn Cwrlage Hill Road 
and South Lynnhai^n Road, 
running a distance of 200 feet 
along the West side of South 
Lyrmhaven Road, running a 
distance of 200 feet along the 
Southern property line and 
running a distance rt 200 feet 
along the East side of 
Carriage Hill Road. Said 
parcel contains 0.92 acre. 
(Princess Arme Plaza-Magic 
Hollow Areas). PRINCESS 

ANNE BOROUGH. 

21. Application of HOT 
Associates for a Conditional 
Use ^rmit fo construct two 
two family detached 
dwellings (duplexes) on 
certain pr(^»ertv located on 
Ihe South side of 2Mh Sh-eet 
begirming at a poini 70 feM 
Northeast of Cypress 
AveiMie, runnlno a di5^»» 
of m feet atong the South 
side ot 3«h StrMt, running a 
distance of 140 feet atong the 
Eastern property line and 
riffmlng a distance ot 120 feet 
alorv *» Souttww propwty 
line and rumiing a dMMce of 
140 feet ato(« the WMrtmi 
property line. One duptai to 
rectow^on Lois M and 3i 
M«d onedM^en liM a and 
34, Mock 1M. Map NO. «. ^ 
el Virginia 
Dew«a#nNM Ca. tm 
wmm MM ai ftJI 



MROUGH. 

23. /^iplication Of William 
O. Porter «id KalMeen J. 
Hall for a Condittonal Use 
Permit to operate a bicycle 
rental in conlimctton with the 
Sheraton Beach Inn on 
certain property located on 
Ihe East side of Atlantic 
Avenue on the North side of 
36th Street at Oceartfront. 
Said parcel is known as a 
part of Lot 1, Block 85, and 
contains 200 square feet. 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. [ 

23. Applicatton of W.W. 
McClanan, Jr., for a Con- 
dittonal Use Permit for a 
lodge for fraternal 
organization on certain 
property beglnntog at a point 
100 feet nrare or Ims along 
Prosperity Road East of 
General Booth Boutovard, 
and running in a Northerly 
direcfton a distance of W7S 
feet more or ten, beginning 
on the East side of Pro^Mr Ity 
Road, running a distance of 
280 Met atong the Western 
property line of which 100 
feet is the East side of 
Prosperity Read, running a 
distance of 743 feet atong the 
Northern property line, 
running a distance of 280 feet 
along the Eastom property 
line and running a distance of 
745 feet along the Southern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 4.1 acres. (KOA 
Campgrounds Area). 
PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

Street Closure: 

24. Application of the City 
of Virginia Beach, Depart- 
ment of Community Ser- 
vices, for thedlsonntinuance, 
closure and abandonment of 
a portion of Providence Road 
beginning at a point 220 toet 
more or less East of the in- 
tersectton of Indian River 
Road and Providence Road 
known as Parcels 4, s and 6 
as shown on a plat entitled 
"Plat Showing Street Closure 
on Providence Road and 
Property Dedication on 
Indian River Road" dated 2- 
22-74, Engineering DIvlston, 
Department of Community 
Services, City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, excluding 
the 35-foot permanent 
utilities easement as 
designated on the subiect 
plat. More detailed in- 
formation Is available in the 
Office of the Planning 
Department. (Barretts 
Corner Area). KEMP- 
SVILLE BOROUGH. 

Plats with more detailed 
intormatlon on the above 
applicattons are available in 
the Department of Planning. 

All interested persons are 
invited to attend. 

Charles C. Carrington 
Director of Planning 

/Way1,8st 
NOTxICE 

Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the 
Council of the City of Virginia 
Beach will be held in the 
Council Chambers of ihe 
Administration Building, 
City Hall, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, on Mgnday, AAay 13, 
1974, at 2:00 P.M. at which 
time the following ap- 
pUcations will be heard: 
Change of l^ing District 
classifications: 
PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH 

DEFERRED BY CITY 
COUNCIL FOR A PERIOD 
OF 90 DAYS ON 
FEBRUARY 12, 1974: 

1. Petition of Com- 
nrKMtwealth Financial Corp., 
by Owen B. Pickett, Attor- 
ney, for a Change of Zoning 
District Classification from 
R-8 Residential DIsh-lct to A- 
1 Apartment District on 
certain property beginning at 
a point 440 feet more or less 
South of South Blrdneck 
Road, running a distance of 
1664 feet more or less along 
the West side of General 
Booth Boulevard, running a 
distance of 325 feet nwre or 
less along the Southern 
property line, running a 
distance of 1365.34 feet along 
the Western property line 
and running a distance of 
159.31 feet along the Northern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 8.5 acres more or 

less. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

2. PetTfion of Com 
monweaith Financial Corp., 
by Owen B. Pickett, Attor- 
ney, for a Change itf Zoning 
Oistrlct Classification from 
R-8 Residential District to A- 
1 Apartment District on 
certain property beginning at 
a point 470 feet more or less 
South of South Blrdneck 
Road, running a distance of 
2100 feet along the Western 
property line of which 1642 
feet is the East side of 
General Booth Boulevard, 
running a distance of 860.78 
feet atong the Southern 
property line, running a 
distance of 1^.11 feet atong 
the Eastern property line and 
runnir«g a distance of 1234.23 
feet along the Northern 
property line of which 200 
feet is the South side of South 
Blrdneck Roed. Said parctf 
contains 41.3 acres wkI ex- 
cludes a iwrcei containing 2.3 
acres proposed for B-1 
commercial Residefitlal 
Zoning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUG|L 

Ji - Petition of Com- 
monwealth Financial Corp., 
by Owen B. Pickett, Attor 
ney, for a Change of Zoning 
District Classificatton from 
R-8 Residential Dish-lct to B 
1 Commercial Residential 
District on certain property 
begkmtog at a point 14M fe^ 
more or IMS South of Soutti 
Blrdneck Road and 115 feet 
more or less East at General 
Booth Boulevard, running a 
distance of 175 feet more or 
less aloftg the Western 
property line, running a 
aWuncm of 444 feet more «- 
less along the Northern 
propwiy line and running a 
dIstwKe of 344 feet more or 
less along the Eastern 
property line and running a 
distance of 342 feet more or 
less along the Southern 
property lirw. Said parcel 
contalm 2.3 aci^s more or 
less. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH 

4. Petition « Eleanor H. 
and Neill AAcRae, Jr., for a 
Owige of Zoning Dish-ict 
Classification from R-8 
RMidcnilal District to M 
OHIce Wth-ict on certain 
prf^MTty located on the 
Se ufHwast meim a* Som* 
Lyiwhaven Itaad and Ai«m>i 
Lane, ««^»a ^»^«» 
M»feelalenitlie«faet««o» 
LyMtaMMi Read, 



Di 



it««MMiael4> 

ftaMMaitf«ttfA 



VIMttlHlA tlACN 



100 feet atong the Western 
propwty line and running a 
distance of ISO feet atong the 
Southern property line. Said 
pai^ la towwn as Uits 1 and 
3. Block 7. Platpf Lynnhaven 
Village md contalm Ujm 
square feet. (Lynnhaven 
Village Aree). LYN- 
NHAVEN BOROUGH. 
S. Petition of Judy 
Afidrassv.bv Peter K. 
Babalat. Attorney, for a 
Change of Zoning Oistrlct 
Classification from R-S 
Residential Dtotrlct to A-4 
Apartment District on 
certain imiperty beginning at 
a potot 723.7 feel Bast of 
Blrdneck Road, running a 
distance of 541.75 teet atong 
the Soutttem property line of 
which 218.52 feet is the North 
side of ChinquiNain Trail, 
running a distance ot 319.n 
feet along the Eastern 
property line (184.02 feet 
South of Laskin Road), 
running a distance of 361.83 
feet along the Northern 
property line and running a 
distance of 309 feet along the 
Western property line. Said 
parcel contains iXil acres. 
Planning Commission 
recommends B-2 Community 
Business Dish-tot. (Blrdneck 
Village Area). LYNN- 
HAVEN BOROUGH. 

«. Petition of Clyde 
Absalom and Bonnie Be-Lo 
AAarkets, Inc., by Grover C. 
Wright, Jr., Attorney, for a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from ' R-S 
Residential District to B-1 
Community Business 
District on certain property 
beginning at tfie point ISO feet 
South of Shore Drive, run- 
ning a distance of 170.6 feet 
along the West sMe of Red 
Tide Road, running a 
distance of 300.94 feet along 
the North sMe of Cape Henry 
Drive, running a distance of 
193.76 feet atong the Eastskto 
of Sea Shell Road, and 
running a distance of 300 toet 
along the Northern property 
line. Said parcel is known as 
Lots 7 through 14, Block M, 
Plat of Lynnhaven Beach. 
(Lynnhaven Colony Area). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

7. Petition of The 
Southland Employees Trust 
for a Change of Zoning 
District Classificatton from 
R-9 Residential Townhouse 
District to B-2 Community 
Business District on certain 
property beginning at a point 
500 feet more Or less South of 
Silina Drive, running a 
distance of 217 feet more or 
less along the West side of 
South Lynnhaven Road, 
running a distance of 464.35 
feet along the Southern 
property line, running a 
distance of 181.52 feet along 
the Western property line, 
and running a distance of 
341 .86 feet along the Northern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 1.96 acres ntore or 
less. (Princess Anne Plaza 
Area). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

8. Petition of Ella L. 
Johnson for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
from R-8 Residential District 
to 1-1 Light Industrial 

istrict on certain property 
beginning at a point 558 feet 
East of North Oceana 
Boulevard, running a 
distance ol 279 feet along the 
North tide of Southern 
BouJevarb, running a 
distance of 7W.7 feet along 
Ihe Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 279 feet 
along the Northern property 
lineand running adistanceof 
780.7 feet along the Western 
property line. Said parcel is 
known as Lot 45, Plat of 
Oceana Gardens and con- 
tains 5 acres. (Oceana 
Gardens Area). LYN- 
NHAVEN BOROUGH. 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH 

9. Petition of A.L. wood 
by Grover C. Wright, Jr., 
Attorney, tor a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
from R-8 Residential District 
(formerly R-2) to A-4 
Apartment District (for- 
merly R-3) on certain 
property located at the 
NcN^west corner of Battle 
Avenue and 25th Street, 
running a distance of 140 feet 
along the West side of Baltic 
Avenue, running a distance 
of 100 feet along the North 
side of 25th Street, running a 
distance of 140 taet along the 
Western pr<verty line and 
running a distance ot 100 feet 
along the Northern property ^ 
line. Said parcel is known as 
Lots 1, 3, and 5, Block 127, 
Virginia Beach Dvelopment 
Company, May No. 6, and 
contains 14,000 square feet. 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

PUNGO BOROUGH 

10. Petition of Seneca 
Campsites. Inc., for a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from AG-1 
Agricultural Dish-ict to A-l 
Apartment District on 
certain property located on 
the West side of Princess 
AM)e Road beginning at a 
point 4600 feet more or less 
South of Public Landing 
Road, running a distance of 
772 feet ak)ng the Eastern 
property line of which KO 
feet is the West side of 
princess Anne Road, running 
a distance of \SS4a4 feet 
along the Southern property 
line, running a distance of 
1302 feet atong the Northern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 26.16 acres. 
(Munden Area). PUMGO 
BOROUGH. 

Condittonal Use Permit 

11. AppHeattoffrt Seneca 
Campsites, inc., for a Con- 
ditional Use Permit to 
operate a mobile home park 
certain property tocated on 
the West side M Princess 
Anne Road beginning at a 
point 4«00 toet more or less 
South of Public Landing 
Road, running a distance of 
772 feet along the Eastern 
property line of ¥^ich 320 
letf it Ihe West side of 
Prtoceaa Anne iteari, running 
a distance of 1534.54 fe« 
atong the Southern property 
ime, nmning a distance of 
1149 fert atofv the WeMem 
proiMrty Itoe and rmmtog a 
distance of 1103 toet etongjhe 
Northern property line, jlid 
parnl contains 36.16 aim. 
(Munden Area). PUNGO 
K>ROUGH. 

Richard J. Webbon 
City Ctortt 

May 1,8, If 

<MDCIIOP 
PUBUCATKW 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE FOR 
THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR 
THE OTY OF VIRGINIA 
•EACH ON THE STTH M^Y 
OP APRIL If74 

CITY OP VtR«t»HA 



BEACH, VIRGINIA, 
a AAunklpal Corporation, 
Complainwtt, 
vs. 

EUEANOR M. PRV,. ' 
Roanoke, virgtola. 
And the contort of this 
detandant whose name is 
atoo unknown, and if the 
defendant be dead. h«r 
survlvtng cofitort, if any 
there be, the defendanft 
cMMren, if any there be. her 
heirs at law, next of kin, 
devlteet. legataet. personal 
repretentatlves. Men 
creditors and \*in creditors 
of any iwirt or devlaeet, and 
any ether poreon or, cor- 
porattont, having ,Miy In- 
terest In the tublect matter 
of thit ttilt; all of whoie pott 
office adchreatad are com- 
pletoly untoMwn; and that all 
of tald paHtot are hereby 
made parties defendant to 
this proceeding by the 
general description of 
"PARTIES UNKNOWN". 
Defendants. 

IN CHANCERY DOCKET 
NO. C74-a5c 

The oblect of this suit Is tor 
the said Complainant to 
enforce its lien for taxes and 
to sell for the payment of 
certain delinquent taxes the 
following-described real 
estato in the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, to-wit: 

ALL THOSE certain placet 
or parcels of land situated In 
the City of Virglnto Beach 
(formerly Prtn«e«i Anne 
County), State of Virglnto 
and designated at Loft Not. 
15 and 16 In Btock A on the 
Plat of Property of the 
Rosemont Corporation of 
City of Norfolk, VIrgtoto. 
which tald Plat It duly 
recorded in the Office of the 
Clerk or the Circuit Court of 
the City of Virginia Beach in 
AAap Book 2, it Pi«e SI. The 
said lots fronting fwenfy-five 
(25) feet each on the Eastern 
sMe of Chestnut Street, and 
running back between 
parallel lines one hundred 
torty (140) feet, more or less, 
to the center of said block. 

IT BEING a part of the 
same property of which a 
one-half IW undivided in- 
terest In tald lota was con- 
veyed by C. C. Taliaferro and 
wife to the Defendant herein 
in Deed Book 98. at Page 309 
and by Deed of Partition 
dated July l, 1934. which was 
duly recorded In Deed Book 
119 at Page 481 in the Clerk's 
Office of the Virginia Beach 
Circuit Court from Tuiey J. 
MItchal conveying his un- 
divided one-half (*/i) intarest 
in Lots 15 and 16, Block A, 
Rosemont, to Ihe Defendant 
herein. 

SAID PROPERTY Is 
shown on the City Assattor't 
AAap as No. F-8-3-t2). 

And an Affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
Defendant is unknown as to 
whereabouts, addren and 
location, although due 
diligence has been used by 
and on behalf of the Com- 
plainant, Its Agents, 
Employees, and Attorneys, 
to ascertain the County of 
Corporation in which the said 
Defendant is residing, but 
without eHect, the last known 
post oHlce addren of the said 
Defendant being ELEANOR 
M. FRY, Roanoke, VirgMa^ 
It is 

ORDERED that she does 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interests In this suit. 
ACOPY-TESTE: 

Larry Wise pq. 
By Sandra Hargrove 
Deputy Clerk 

P.O. Box 15142 

Chesapeake, Virginia 23330 

Telephone: 

547-4095 

"' "" M, 8 2t 



ORDER OP 
PUBLICATION 

COMMONWEALTH X»P 
VIRGINIA, 

In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on the 23rd 
day ot April, 1974. 
Robert L. Dowdy 
Plaintiff 
against 

Audrey Gehrmann Dowdy, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrirtwnll from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of two vear separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that due 
diligence has been used by or 
on behalf of the Complainant 
to ascertain in whIcA county 
or corporation the defendant 
resides, without effect, the 
last known post office ad- 
dress being: 2967 Talon 
Court, Va. Beach, VA 23456 It 
is ordered that she do appear 
here within ten (10) days 
after due publication ttereof, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 
A ojpyTest: 

JOHN V. FENTRESS; 
CLERK 

BY Sandra Hargrove O. 
Clerk. 

Barrow & Lowe 
3104 Arctic Ave. 
Virginta BeKh, VA 

5-1, 8, 15, 22, 4T 



Chrlstto 

900 Plaza One 

Norfolk, VA 



5-1,8.15,1 



£1 



ORDER OP 
PUBUCHTIOtl 



H tif* 



COMMONVI^ALTI 
VIRGINIA 

In the Clwk's OHice of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Vlrghita Beach on fhe 23rd 
day of A[N-II, 1974. 
Barbara J. AAcChire, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Marvto L. AAcClure, 
Defendant. 

The oblect of this suit to to 
obtain a divorce A AAenta Et 
Thoro to be later merged Into 
a divorce A Vineute 
Matrimonni at tt»e proper 
time from tf» tato defen- 
dant, i^xm the growMft of 
<tesertion on Janowy 11. 
1974. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and f IMd that the 
defendant is not a residont of 
the State of Virglnto, the last 
known post ©Mice address 
U.S4. Coral Sea CVS 21, 
F P.O. San Francisco, 
Califomia it is arOvnd that 
he do mpear here withto ten 
(10) days after di» 
publicatkw h«-eof, and (to 
wnat may be necenwY to 
protect his interesi in this 
suit. 

A CTPV Test: 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 
CLERK 

BY: Sandra i laigrev e D. 
CMrk 
Decker, ZMy. CMlM & 



ORDER OP 
PUILICATION 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 

CLERK'S OFFICE FOR 

THE CIRCUIT COURT OP 

THE eiTY OF VIRGINIA 

BEACH ON THE 19th DAY 

OF APRIL 1974. 

CITY OF VIRGINIA 

BEACH, VIRGINIA, 

a Municipal Corporation, 

Complainant, 

vs. 

JOHN R. RIDDICK, 

aiMrett completoly unknown 

and unavailable. 



and the contort of this 
Defendant, whMt name Is 
alto untowwn, and if the 
defendant be dead, his 
surviving eonaort, if any 
there be, the defenders 
children, if any there be, hit 
helri at law, next of kin, 
devlteet, legataet, pertonal 
repretentatlves. Hen 
creditor* and lien creditort 
of any heirt or devlteet, and 
any other penon or cor- 
porattont having any intorett 
in the tublect matter ot this 
suit, all of whose pott oHIee 
addrettet are completely 
unknown; and that all of tald 
parties are hereby made 
parties defendant to this 
proceeding by the general 
description of "PARTIES 
UNKNOWN", Defendanto. 
IN CNANCiRY 
DOCKET NO. 
C744Mi 

The oblect of this suit is for 
the said Complainant to 
enforce ito lien for taxes and 
to sell for the peyment of 
certain delinquent taxes the 
followlng-detcribed real 
estate in the City of virglnto 
Beach, Virglnto, to-wIt: 

ALL THOSE certain thirty- 
five (35) tots titoate in the 
City of Virginia Beach 
(tormerly County of Prlnntt 
Anne), Virginia, and num- 
bered and detlgnated at Loto 
4.6.7,8,9,31.35.36,37,38,39, 
30. 31. 33, 33, 34. 35, 43. Lota 46 
through 61 (incluilva), and 
Lot 85. Btock 14 on the Plat of 
"Oakwood" made 
by Coleman t, PItehett, Civil 
Englneert. In AAarch 1914; 
tald lots 4, 6, 7, 8. 9, 31, B, 36, 
37, 38, 39, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34 and 
35 fronting on Ruby Avenue, 
and loto 43 46 through 61 
(Inclusive) and Lot 85 
fronting on Pearl Avenue as 
shown on the aforementlotwd 
Plat duly recorded in the 
Clerk's Office of the said City 
of Virginia Beach in AAap 
Book 5, at Page 27. SAID 
PROPERTY to also shown on 
the City Assessor's Map at B- 
4-1(3) (plut tpeclfic Lot 
Number). 

And an Affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
Defendant It unknown at to 
whereabouti, addreti and 
location, although due 
diligence hat been uted by 
and on behalf of the Com- 
plainant. Itt Agentt. 
Employee*, and Attorneyt, 
to ascertain the County of 
Corporation In which the said 
Defendant It now retldlng. 
but without eHKt, the latt 
known poft oHIce addrets of 
th* said Defendant being 
completely unknown af\d 
unavatlMlei It Is 
ORDERED that the does 

appear hare within ten (10) 
days aftar due publication 

here<rf, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 

Interest in this tult. 

A COPY-TESTE: 

Larry WIte, p.q. 

By Sandra Hargrove Deputy 

Clerk 

P.O. Box 15143 

Chetapaake. Virginia 23330 

Telephone; 

547-4095 

547-3364. 

5-1,8 — 3T 



ORDRROP 
PUBLICATION 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 

CLERK'S OFFICE OF THE 

CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 

CITY OF VtRGINIA BEACH 

ON THE 39th DAY OP 

APRIL, 1974. 

CITY OF VIRGINIA 

BEACH. VIRGINIA 

a Municipal Corporation, 

Complainant. 

vt. 

HERBERT LAND and LISA 

LAND, altO'known at LIZA 

LAND, Husband and WHe, 

Princess Anne County, 

Virgtola, 

and the consorts of these 
defendanto. wtioie names are 
also unknown, and if the 
defendanto be dead, their 
surviving cortsorto if any 
there be. the defendanto' 
children, if any there be. 
their heirs at law, next of kin. 
devisees, legatees, personal 
repreaentativet. Hen 
creditor* and lien creditort 
of any heirs devlteet, and 
any other person or cor- 
poraflont having any Interett 
in the tublect natter of this 
suit, all of whose post office 
addresses are completely 
uiAnown; and that all of said 
parties are hereby made 
partlet defertdant to tfilt 
proceeding by the general 
detcrlptien of "PARTIES 
UNKNOWN". Defendanft. 
IN CNANCBRY 
OOCKRTNO. 
C74-»5A 

The oblect of thit tult It for 
the said Complainant to 
enforce itt lien for taxes »t\6 
to tell for me payment of 
certain delinquent taxes the 
following-described real 
estate In the City of Virglnto 
Beach, Virglnto. to-wIt: 

ALL THAT certain let. 
ptoce or parcel of land, lying 
and bMig in Kempsvllle 
Borough of the City of 
Virginia Beach (formerly 
Kempsvllle Atagisferiai 
Dlsfrict of Princwt Awie 
County), State of VirgMa, 
described as follows: 
BEOINNlNGatapMrt intbe 
WMlem Itoe of Rufw Parks, 
marked by a pipe, the 
Wgilliaaii comer ol the iMto 
hereby conveyed and fte 
land this day eon^nyed by 
t^ Grantor* to ^ontos 
Williams and Beatrice 
Williams; and running 
them* South atong the West 
Itoe Of said Ri^ut Park*. 313 
feet tM 8 Wtchet to the 
Northern line of JamM 
C^lck, m«rMd by a pipe; 
MnceWM^^teet lOhichw 
to a pobit iMMtod by an oak 
free; the iouthwHt comer M 
the preM^ hereby con- 
viyed MP.i»*-tM Mm« 
OdpiMc ^^hemM Mson. 
iMnce i^w atom tha 
Eastern line of Thomas 
itmmB atm^i tocR^ fo a 



Tha SunHAfadnesday, May 8. 1974-Pi9i 13 

Themas AAaton; thence East 
akxtig the southern line^ the 
land cbhveyed to said 
wnMtomt and wita 153 feet to 
a MBtot In the Wastam Mw af 
tNsaid RufM Parks marked 
by a pipe, the point of 
beginnii>g. 

IT BEING EXACTLY the 
saifw property conveyed to 
th# Defendant herein by 
Deed frbm C.C. Frizzell and 
his wife, on January 10, 1949. 
which said deed It duly 
recofttod la toe Office of the 
Clerk of the Circuit Court of 
Virginia Beach In Deed Bo^ 
261, at Page 339. SAID 
PROPERTY b shown on Ihe 
City Attessm^ AAap as E5-2- 
(2)18. 

And an Affidavit having 
been made and fttod that the 
Defendanto are unknown as 
to whereabouto. address and 
location, although due 
diligence has been used by 
and on behalf of the Com- 
plainant. Its Agents, 
Employees and Attorneys, to 
ascertain the County of 
Corporatton In which the said 
DefffKtonto »rt residing, but 
wllhoul effect, the last known 
post office addresses of the 
said Defendants being 
Prlncets Anne County, 
Virglnto; It is 

ORDERED that they do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what nf>ay be 
necessary to protect their 
Intaresto In this suit. 
A COPY-TESTE: 
Larry Wl*« P.q. 
By Sandra Margrove Deputy 
Clerk 

P.O. Box 1S142 
Chetapeake, Virglnto 33330 
Telephone: 
547-409S 
547 3364. 

5-1,8— IT 



ORDER 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE CIRCUIT 
COURt OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH, ON THE 
36th DAY OP APRIL, 1974. 
In re: Adoption of OavM 
Wayne AAanter an Infant 
under the age of fourteen 
yeart to be named David 
Wayne Tripp 

By: Joan Esther SImont 
Tripp and Robert Lloyd 
TrIpp Petitioners 
To; William Norman AAanter 
Waltham. Mattachutetto 

Thitday came Joan Bather 
Simons Tripp and Robert 
Lloyd Tripp, Petitioner*, and 
repretonted that the object of 
thit proceeding it to effect 
the adoptton of the above 
named infant (t). David 
Wayne Manter, by Joan 
Etther SImont Tripp and 
Robert LloVd Tripp, hutband 
and wife, and affidavit 
having been made and filed 
that Joan Etther SImont 
Tripp, a natural parent of 
tato Chlld(ren), it a non- 
retident of the State of 
Virginia, the latt known pott 
office addrns being: 
Waltham, Massachutetto, 
it Is theretore Ordered that 
the tald Willtom Norman 
AAanter appear betore this 
Court within ten (10) days 
after publication of this 
Order and Indicate his-her 
altitude toward the proposed 
adoption, or otherwise do 
what is necetury to protect 
hit interest in this matter. 
A cbpy testa; 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit D.C. 
Penelope 0. Coffman 
4999 Cleveland Street 
Va. Beach, Va. 

5-1,8,1»,12-4T 



ORDER OP 
PUBLICATION 
COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 29th 
day of April, 1974. 
Mary Hughes Webb, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Don Hughey Webb, Oefen 
dent. 

The oblect of thto suit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
AAatrlnxHill from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of desertion contlnuoi^ for 
two years without in- 
terruption. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendent Is a non-retldent of 
the State of virginta. the last 
known pott office address 
being: c-o Modlne Rollins, 
Rutherfordton. North 
Carolina. 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days atter due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 
A copy-Taste; John V. 
Fanh-ess. Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk 

Kelsey ft Kelsey 
1408 AAaritime Tower 
NoHolk, Virglnto 

5-1,8. 15, »-«T 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF 
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH, ON THE 11th DAY 
OF April, 1974. 

In Chancery 

No. C 74 280 ^wj. 
In tf. Adoption of John 
Douglas Lipps 
By: Michael D. Miller and 
Margaret K. Miller, 
Petlttoners ^ 

To: John D. Lipps 
120 Sterling Street 
Norfolk, Virginia 



ORDER 



m^tm^^^ 



iiynip«t, 

f Iw said 



.... earner at 

Wllllama and Wifo and saw 



This day came Michael 
0. Miller and Margaret K. 
Miller, Petitioners, and 
represented that the oblect 
of this proceeding is to 
effect the adoption of the 
above named infant, Jehn 
Douglas Lipps, by Michael 
0. Miller and Margaret K. 
Miller, husband and wife, 
and affadvait having been 
made and filed that John D. 
Lipvt, a natural par^t of 
tatd^iM. to a nonrwident 
of the State of Virginia, fo 
ascertain hto whereabouts, 
toino effoct- the tost known 
post office address being: 
t2» Sterling Street, Norfolk 
Virginia. 

It is therefore Ordered 
that the said John D. Lipps 
aMiear before this Court 
within ten (10) dayt aftor 
publication of thit Order 
and indicate hto attitude 
toward the proposed 
adoption, or otherwise do 
what Is necessary fo protoct 
hit Interest m this matter* 

jMi V. Fenlra». Cterk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit DC 

PetM^d. Decker, Jr. 
fOtP'taw Qfe 1^ 

Nwtoik, villinia 

4 24,5 »,i,»i «t 



CIcissiiied 



p# ^^ 



Pags 14-The Sun-Wednesday, May 8, 1974 



486-S4IO 




LiOALS 



CommonwMlth of Virgirrta, 
In the Clerk's Office of 
the CIrciut Court of the Glty 
of Virginia Beacti, on tt»e 
17tt< day of April, 1974. 
Mariorie Jane HOllmann 
Pletclier, Plaintiff, 
against 

Tully Mack Fletcher, Jr., 
Defendant. 



ORDER OP 
PUBUCATiON 



Ttieobiect Of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
of separation uninterrupted 
for more than two years. 

And an affidavit having 
l>een made and filed that 
the defendant is a non 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 

411 North Driver Court, 
Durham, North Carolina. 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk 

Smith, Power, & Owens 

412 Msritime Tower 
Norfolk, Virginia 

4-24,5 1,8,1S-4t 



Comni"nwealih ol Virginia, 
In ihc Clerk'*^ Oliice ol the 
Circuii Court of the City o( 
Virginia Beach, on the 22nri 
flay "t April, 1974. 
WanriA Faye Ble«;slng Lynch, 
PlainiiK, 
again?^' 

Paul Lvnch, Deiendan'. 
ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 



The object ol this <;uil is to 
obtain an absolute divorce 
Iront ihp saifi deferKlani upon 
the grounds ol two year 
separation. 

Anr< an alliriavit having 
been made and tiled that due 
riiligerKe has been used by or 
in behalt ol the complainant 
to ascertain in which county 
or corporation the defendant 
is, without ellect, the last 
known pos> office address 
being: 3306 Balleniine 
Boulevard, Norfolk. 
Virginia. 

M is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
day alter due publication 
hereoi, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 
A copy Teste: John V. 
Fentress, Clerk 
By J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk . . . 

Tidewater Legal Aid Society 
700 Duke Street 
Norfolk, Virginia 

«-24— H,«,1S4T 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
»th day of April, 1974. 
Jacqueline A. Greene, 
Plaintiff; against 
Charles R. Greene, III, 
Defendant 

OROEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Theobiect Of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of willful desertion 
and abandonment. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
sot North Pine Street, 
Seaford, Delaware. 

It Is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
Interest in this suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 

CLERK 

BY: Sandra Hargrove D. 

Clerk 



against 

Anna K. Martin, Defendant. 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Theobiect Of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
thoro to be later merged 
into a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: c- 
Charles Anderson Route 
1, Belvldere, Tennessee 
. 37306. 

It Is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk 

Osie H. Gay, Jr. 

2871 River Road 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 

4.17.24,5-1,8 4t 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 

CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 

CITY OF VIRGINIA 

BEACH ON THE 12th DAY 

OF APRIL, 1974, 

ELIZABETH T. 

OVERCASH 

Sole Surviving Executrix of 

the Estate of Robert Easton 

Townsend, deceased. 

Complainant, 

v. 

MARY L. CHILDRESS 

Address Unknown 

and the heirs of law, next of 

kin , devisees, legatees, 

creditors and lien creditors 

of any heirs or devisees of 

Mary L. Childress, ail of 

whose names are unknown 

and whose post office 

addresses are unknown, all 

of whom are made parties 

to the proceeding of the 

general description of 

Parties Unknown, 

Respondents. 

INCHANCERY 
NO.. C. 74 474 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 



THE 8ti» DAY OF April, 
1974. 
In re Baby Girl Hogan 

The obiect of this 
proceeding Is to separate 
the above named Infant, 
child of Ramone Castro 
Jimenez IV and Mary Jean 
Hogan, permanently from 
ist parents and to commit 
said infant to the care and 
custody of the Virginia 
Beach Department of 
^ciai Services with the 
right of said agency to 
consent to the Infant's 
adoption. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
Ramone Castro Jimenez IV 
is a proper party to this 
proceeding; but due 
diligence has been used to 
ascertain in what county or 
corporation he is, without 
eHect, it Is ORDERED that 
Ramone Castro Jimenez IV 
do appear here within ten 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 
A COPY TESTE: Gerald F. 
Williams, Clerk, 



Department of Social 

Services 

(Petitioner) 

Elizabeth E. Henley Clerk 



Tf 



mmmst 



"^^^^^^^ 



21 toali 



4 17, 24, 5 1, 8, 4t 'S ■'^"AT YOU ETHEL?? 



Nancy Farley, 



RATES: "Person to 
Person" ads for individuals 
buying, selling, renting, or 
offering a service. Up to 12 
words, only $l per issue, 
add SO cents for each 
additional 4 words. 

Classified display S2.52 
per column Inch, with a 
minimum charge of $5.04 
except on contract basis. 

Business Rates: 25 cents 
per line, minimum charge 
of S2.00. 

DEADLINE for classified 
display is Noon Monday 
prior to Wednesday 
publication. In column 
classifieds accepted until 5 
p.m. Monday prior to 
Wednesday publication. 

Place ads at the SUN 
office 138 S. Rosemont Rd., 
Va. Beach, Va. 23452, or 
mail to Classified Desk; or 
phone 486-3430. Classifieds 
are priced on cash basis; 
payment is due upon 
receipt of statement. 



Theoblectof thissult isto 
quiet title to property which 
is more particularly 
described as follows: that 
certain lot, piece or parcel 
of land situated in the City 
of Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
known and numbered as 
Lot 2, Block 40 as shown on 
that certain plat of Euclid 
Place which is duly of 
record in the Clerk's Office 
of the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, in Map Book 4 at 
pages 62 and 63. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that on 
Information and belief 
Mary L. Childress is not 
living. 

And an affidavit having 
been filed stating that there 
are or may be other persons 
interested in the subject 
matter to be disposed of in 
this suit whose names are 
unknown and whose last 
post office addresses are 
unknown, to-wit: The heirs 
at law, next of kin, 
devisees, legatees, 
creditors and lien creditors 
of any heirs or devisees of 
Mary L. Childress, all of 
whose names are unknown 
and whose post office 
addresses are unknown, all 
of whom are made parties 
to the proceeding by the 
general description of 
Parties Unknown; it is 
ORDERED that the above 
named persons appear 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication of this 
Order and do what is 
necessary to protect their 
interests; and it Is 

FURTHER ORDERED 
that the foregoing portion of 
this Order be published 
once a week for four (4) 
successive weeks in The 
Virginia Beach Sgn, a 
newspaper printed in the 
City of Virginia Beach, and 
having circulation in the 
City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By Sandra Hargrove 



Wlllcox. Savage, Lawrence, p^^^ ^ Agelasto, III 

al« ^, . » ,, 1300 United Virginia Bank 

Virginia National Bank g,^g 

BIdg. Norfolk, VA 
Norfolk. VA 4-17,24,5 1,8-4t 

4-17,24,5-1,5-8-4t __^ 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In Me Clerk's OHIct of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
9th day of April, 1974. 
Theodore R. Stohr, 
PlalntlH, 
against 

Linda Ann Stohr, 

Defendant. 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Theoblectof this suit isto 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
tHoro from the said 
defendant to 4>e later 
merged into a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant upon the 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
baan made and filed that 
ihie diligence t«as been used 
by or \ir behalf of the 
complainant to ascertain in 
which county or 

corporation the defendant 
M wltftout eHect, the last 
known pott office address 
baing: M33 Ashlawn 
Terrace, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 

it is ordered tltat the do 
^pear here wittiln tan (10) 
days after due pi*iiatlon 
liMver, and do what may be 
RKaMary to ix-otact her 
Meraat kt this suit. 

Mm V. FentraM, Clerk 
By: Sandra Hargrttee, 
l»a»«^C^k 

Clark, Stdliihlltoer ft 

m Mmbr^» Office Park 
Vh^mia BdKh, Vlrf^la 




„ I of Vh-BlNia, 

M Nw Clarke OW^ of 
Iha Cirailt C»Mrt of n»e City 
M VirgMla tMCh, on tfte 

Miftin> 



^^tolA^Wf, 



Commonwealth of Virginia, ' 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
12th day of April, 1974. 
G.l«#x^n n D w 1 g h t 
BlanWenbaker, Plaintiff, 
against 

Jewell Haddock 
Blankenbaker, Defendant. 

ORDEROF 
PUBLItCATION 

Tht^iect of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
of Insertion on February 23, 
1973. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant Is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office addrest being: 
2313 Yancy Street, Raleigh, 
North Carolina. 

It it ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest In this suit. 
JOHN V. FENTRESS: 
CLERK 

BY: Sandra Hargrove D. 
Clw-k 

Decker, Zoby, Col Hat, al 
9QB Plaza OfM 
NerWk, VA 

4-17.24.5 1,8-4t 

OROIROP 
PUBLICATIWi 

COMJMHIWBALTM 
O^VJllttlHIA 

VIRGINIA: JN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF 
THE JUVBNILE AND 
DOMieSTIC RELATIONS 
OJURT OF THE CITY Of 
VIRGINIA BEACH, on 







DIAL- '486- 3430 



QUICK CHECK 
CLASSIFIED INDEX 



ANNOUNCOfENTS 



1 t 



SuraMntAd* 1 

NnonilNotlcM 2 

ipacial ItrvlcM 3 

Traiiportsllon 4 

LMtaFeund I 

CareotThanki * 

In nMfnorwni 7 

MonMn«Ms-a«rial Loti I 



REAL ESTATE FOR RENT 



AUTOMOTIVE 



AuleiMbllMlorSMt n 

Truda,Tr*ll«n, Jatei 13 

WaMMAutamonvt 13A 

Aufai.Tnicii>«arhlr« 13 ' 

Au<«niii,R«prir« 14 

*wtaAecin.-Palntlnt MA 

UtlN»yTr»lt»n W 

tuMt ISA 

WantMTrallwt ISa 

MDlQrcyctMt Scoofvra ........... 

Aircraft Mr ul*, parti 17 



I RECREATIOWAL \ 

Campan, Trallara » 

aac.Vthlelaalorhlra MA 

Camp, leant eqi4p » 

tawnSuppilM 5 

laaM, Marina (upplla* 11 

laMtMrHira »1A 



I OIWjOYMEWT I 

HBlpWantad 34 

Raaumat. LMlnoa 31 

jabawantad » 

I PWAWdAt ) 

BualAHa OpparfHiMtlla ....'... .31 
WanladMaiiyBuilnarf'. 3IA 

m 

4t 

41 



y a wniucnoN \ 

CarfMpandaacaCauna 41 

Laeal lilwcHan Oawaa O 

Oafiaral imirMollaiia • ^a 

Maa l c DM Ca-OramaMci «< 

PrIvaMMalrvcllana 4f 



BOB we all miss you! Hope 
you're having lun! The 
Gang. 



MARGARET - We love you 
and miss you. Bill & Jeanne. 

TO GLADI, HEIDI, AND 
PAM - at the Navy Lodge. I 
will never tell which Sun 
shine ad was mine, but t-wili 
be looking lor yours. 

JOte A Special Person like 
you deserves A Special 

Song! I you. too! 

Fuzzy., Wuzzy! 

DIANE My love for you 
qrows day l)y day. Hap 
pine»>' i«; our', in every way. 
Mine is yours, yours is mine, 
Leti'betilMheendol time. I 
Love You, Papa Bear. 

TOM 8. DIANE - Watch out 
(or the Mooses! Tim. 

TOM - it'', been the most 
, wiinderful month ol my life. I 
Love you, Diane 



iPETO-uventxxl 



Oa^,Ca«s,OIMrPal» 47 

Pat-M«a tarvKa «A 

Haraaa,Cami,l<c 4i 

PauHryatwpMaa 4» 



D 



DB»T(AIES 



Noaia tHNnoMiaPAiR auipa 



Ap4rtm*nl>'Furnl>h«4 7) 

Apvtmtflti, Unfurn Wwd 74 

GaragnlorRani 73 

Ftrm* and Land for Rant 7* 

Movan.Storasa ZtA 

Housas (or Rtnt 77 

FurnMiM Houiaa 77A 



MERCHANMSE | 

ArtlclaatarSala St 

Antlquat S1A 

HomahoMGood* ,.» 

Oarata-Rummaga S3A 

VMnttdlsluy S3 

S«Mp-Trada SJA 

MMlcal MarchandiM 54 

TVRadla-Starao S 

eiactranlc Equlpmant ISA 

Calm and Stampa 54 

Jfwatryawatehaa 57 

WaarlngAppval S7A 

Oood'nilngateEat 51 

Farm and Dairy Praducli 5M 

Plrtwaod 5» 

Latwi and Cardan 40 

Stadi-PlanH-Plowara MA 

Faadand Fartllliar «1 

Farm Implamanli 41A 

MKtilnaryandToata M 

lulWlngMatarMM « 

BuMnau Ea<4pniaM 44 



I MOBLEHOiiES | 

MoMlaHoniaaterSala *S 

MoWlaHomattarRam «6A 

MoWlaHoniaMMwa 46B 

Mobile M0flfl#SlW4 ■• 

MoMlv I lowii wMitod ........ . MA 



I RooMs«yreLS | 

RaaimwIttiBoard «7 

Raanawmnut Beard « 

RotmaMrHouaakaaplna M 

R iw rim etati 70 

RaMiranft n 

Wanlaa-Raanwer toard 73 

Raaort ftaparty lar Rant 79 

SubwbanMrRaM 7tA 

OutatTaamtorRant 7tB 

WMtadtaRanl 79 

Far Rant arSala ■ 

OraundLaaaa* (BA 

Bui l n aaa PHeat tar Rant tl 

OMcaaandOatklpaca tIA 

IndvatrM lor Rant BIB 

\kEAL estate for SALEjl 

iflduMrMlorSala lie 

BuiMMt Praparty-Sala n 

iw^^mRtfn property S3A 

ApartmaiMMr $•!• na 

Ftrma-Land-Tlmbar n 

RaM EMitatMicai 14 

nrlataNonelfc U 

For tale VIrBMaBaach H 

nrSatoOMMpaahi 17 

For tBn ^VnfllSlltn -H 

CondBlMiilliRM MA 

SwBtrt wiforSIa H 

RaavtPrgpartylortala fl 

OiitatTMinMrSMa n 

LotlMrtato ...n 

^idiaPea Raal Ettala -94 

For Swe or Exctienea 95 

wMioe-inBi eaiwa .fi 

rwif Hofnaa Mr Iwa .......... .97 



PLACE A 'PERSON TO P«R«>N" AD 
I ANV OP THE ABOVE CLAMIFICATIW4S 
CiUa.4M-3«Sg 



TUTORING AVAILABLE 
Fourth year education 
major wishes to tutor 
elementary children in your 
home or mine. Particular 
interest in Special Children 
including learning disabled 
awl mentally retarded. Call 
Suzanne Hollandsworth, 486- 
1514. 

WE HAUL 

OLD CARS AWAY 

633-9194. 



■ AUTOMGBILESl 
llAuttMiiobiletPotSak 



TR 



SappBet 




TOM 8. DIANE - Mush, 
Mush, Mush! The Genius 



TOM & DIANE 

Assistant. 



Me Too! 



J.M. The smile on her face 
ha? turned '0 a grin. What 
are you up to? D.M. 

JOYCE - Thanks for being 
my Iriend, Diane. 

RUBY TURNER - Happy 
Mother's Day to the greatest 
Mother in the world! Keep 
on getting better! We love 
vou very very much. Sondra, 
Diane, Archie 8i families. 

IRENE - (Mother) Thanks 
lor being ihere when vou are 
needed, now and always. 

Ann. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



3 Special Seivicet 



AUTOJUNK 

TOWED 
AWAY FREE 

ANYTIME 
8557488 




I SISTER TINA 
Reader and Advisor 

On all piobiems of Life such 
IS maniage, business, love af- 
fain, couTtihip, akojiol, or if 
you're sick or in need of 
help, come lee Sister Tina. 
AU readings private and con- 
fidential. Can for appoint- 
ment 

340-2774 
2236 VIRGINIA 
BEACH BLVD. 
CORNER GREAT 
NECKRD. . Next 
to Hardee's, London Bridge. 

PRIVATE HOME-Paikii« 

facilitiei. 
UNITED TIME SPECIAL 
GROUP READINGS 
(»4LY$1. PER PERSON 



CHRYSLER — New 
Yorker, 1970. 4 dr. hardtop, 
Exctl. cond. $1495. Davis 
Corner Motors, 497-8100. 

CONTINENTAL - 1967 
Lincoln, S800. 464 3693. 

FORD — 1973 Pinto Squire 
Station Wagon, air 
conditioned. 420-1152. 

FORD— 1970 Station Wagon, 
good condition, $700. or will 
trade. 464-3189. 

FORD 1969, "jton 

E'<piorer custom cab; 360 V 
8 engine, automatic, ex 
ceilent condition;.$1,650; 397 
0882. 

FORD LTD 1968, Best offer 
ovfer $450. 

4868623. 

JAGUAR — 1971, V-12, 2 plus 
2, everything. $6500. 588-7435. 

JAGUAR — 1972 V-12, 2 plus 
2, loaded. $6,000. Excellent 
condition. 857-5792. 

0LD9M0BILE - 1972, '98. 
Excellent condition. Like 
new. $2800. 424 1175. 

OPEL - 1968, good running 
condition. $700. 499-1308. 

PLYMOUTH — 1973 
Duster, 6 cylinder 
automatic, air cond., power 
steering, very clean. $2595. 
427-3498. 

PLYMOUTH — 1963, 4 dOor, 
new tires, new battery. $350. 
588-2540. 

PONTIAC - 1973 Firebird, 
V8, automatic. Vinyl top. 
Make offer. 427 1451, after 6. 

PONTIAC — 1972 Grand 
Prix, all power, air con- 
ditktned, 427-3325 



AUTHORIZED 

T-CRAFT DEALER 
JACK THORNTON 

MOBILE HOMES 

PH: 8SS-2S10 

ioikT— iwaFiSir Foam,255 
h.p.-Mtrcrultar command 
bridge, fully equipped In- 
cluding CBVHF radto's and 
many extras. Call Miss Ruth, 
(804) 460-1166. 

PENN YAN - Tunnel drive, 
23', 1969, lully equipped. 497- 
0174. 

SHOUP — IS ft. mahogany 
boat, needs bottom repaired. 
Boat free, minimum coat for 
frailer and homellte 4 cycle 
engine. 428-5137. 

■ QinX)YMH4TB 



BABYSItTING In my 
home. Infant to 3 years. 428- 
4058. 



LITTLE FRIEND to play 
with, my ntommy will take 
care of you while yours 
works. Windsor Woods. 340- 
6765. _ 

PLANNING A Wedding? Let 
me make your Bridesmaid 
dresses. Expd. 497-3461. 

TEACHER - mature, 
responsible, will exchange 
babysitting, housesitting, 
miscellaneous lor summer 
room. References. Box 83, 
Heathsville, Va. 22473. 

38 BiMiMH OppoftanMai 

A CHANCE TO 

SUCCEED— develop your 
own business. Call 340-1317 
after 5 PM. 



WE NEED BADLY 
cash paid for cameras, ta^ 
recorders, stereos, TV sP 
Band Instruments, 
TviJewrlters, guns. 

"^ LITTMAN'S 
201 City Hall av. 622-6989 



SSOoodTMngiTooEat 

WE SELL Live Crabs, by 
the dozen or by the bushel. 
Earl Smith Oyster Co., 947 
HurdS rd., 3405171. 



61FeedftPertili»i 




34 H^ Wanted 



ENERGY OPPORTUNITY 
Crisis lor some brings op- 
portunities for others. Local 
business man with sky 
rocketing growth looking for 
mature married person, to 
assist with management 
responsibilities. Work in on a 
part-time basis. Mid-teen 
potential lor first year. By 
appointment only, call 547- 
3907. 

BABYSITTER — In my 
home. 70th. St., Virginia 
Beach. Call 428-3428. 

$2.75 PER HOUR 
,Part or full time. Ideal for 
civilian or military. We need 
10 people to work In sales and 
service dept. No experience 
necessary. Call Mrs. Black, 
499-1269. 



VOICE LESSONS — 
Beginners, advanced. James 
Morrlsson. 428-0SB7. 



GRIMES 

MUSIC SCHOOL 

PriviltMulfc Lettontii) 

Pemtooke Aiea 
5 Strlns Banjo-Tenor Btnjo- 
Uultar-Electric Ban-Hawa- 
iian Oultar-Mandolin. 




lADIES- MEN 

BRANCH MANAGER 
TRAINEES 

Local progressive 
company will train 3 ladles 
for Branch Manager 
positions. Must have neat 
appearance. 

$610 month to start 
Pius bonuses and benefits 

Call 499-2763 



47 Dog^Catl.OthB^PW^ 

AIREDALE TERRIERS — 
AKC reg., shots, ready to go. 
$100. cash. 499-7713. 

BEAGLE PUPS 

Registered, $75. 625-7131, 
please leave message. 

IRISH SETTER 14 month 
old male. Registered. 486 
3255 or 340-4622. 

POODLES - Silver 
niiniature, 7 weeks, 2 males. 
$50 each. 499-2633. 



HORSE MANURE 

$6.00 pickup load 

426 2572 



6IA P ann Innfementt 

STEVENSON 

FORD TRACTOR 

1792 S. Military Hwy. 



63 Bla ding Matnials 

HOME Builders 8i Con- 
tractors ■ Let us help you 
with that new home, ad- 
ditions or repairs. We can 
furnish materials from 
basement to attic and aid you 
in financing. Phone 
KELLAM ft EATON 427-3200. 

64 Bi'tinatt B qulpfnant 

RENT OR BUY - new 8. 
used oRice furniture. Ex- 
rental desks $49 8. up. New 
damaged files $39 8< up. Free 
delivery. 

DESKS, INC. 
3411 High St. 397 7883 

65 Mo bile Hornet For Sale 

STYLEMAR — 1972, 65' x 12' 
2 bedrooms, 2 full baths. 
A-^sume balance. 428-8437. 

73 Apartmawtt-F umlthtd 

TO SHARE — Small 
cottage near ocean. Woman 
only. 428-1804. 



A 



A Movei»Stoiiff 



FURNITURE MOVING — 
Washers, dryers, 
refrigerators, Pianos, Etc. 24 
hours, 7 days a week and 
holidays no extra charge. 
853-9308. 



HAIRDRESSER 8i 
VIVIAN WOODARD 
BEAUTY 
CONSULTANTS. 
Immediate openings, full 
or part-time. Call Mrs. 
Vesely, 340-3230, 420-6808. 



RENAULT 

The nation's largest selection of 
used Renaults from the nation's 
larqest Renault dealer. All 
models, colors and prices. Most 
are one owner cars with our 
famous one year warranty. 

EASTERN AUTO 

»33 6 LITTLE CREEK RD. 5« 
1314 ■ 



AUTO JUNK 

Towed Away Free 
Call 855-4372 



AFGHANS — 
my pretty 
afghans", all 
486-6627. 



"Come see 

crocheted 

colors. $35, 



CANDY THE CLOWN - 
Birthdays, Promotionals, 
Grand Openings. 587-3697. 



DRESSMAKING — 
Alterations. 10 
experience. 497-0982. 



And 
yrs. 



RAMBLER — 1959: 6 
cylinder automatic; good 
condition; $250 or best offer; 
4256572 

THUNDERBIRD — 1959 
Classic. Excellent condition. 
Driven dally. $500. 587-2075. 

VEGA 1971, runs and looks 
pood. Must sell. $1495, or 
best offer. 853-9597. 

VOLKSWAGEN BEETLE — 
1968; good condition, $995. 
340-5137. 

VOLKSWAGEN — 1973 
Beetle; built-in tape deck; 
low mileage; $2650. 340-5137. 

12 TnKltt.Titilert, leapt 

FORD — 1973 F-lOO Pickup 
truck, 8 ft. bed with camper 
shell, 302 engine, straight 
stick. $2,850. 588-2540. 



16 Motonyclat, Scooten 



MALE OR FEMALE - Part 
lime, day or evenings. Good 
Summer work. For 
Appoinfmertt call 499-2715. 

TELEPHONE SOLICITOR 
- Call between 8 and 10 a.m., 
340-4162. 

OPENINGS FOR 
3 PEOPLE 

Work part or full time. Good 

Steady income in your area, 

no experience necessary. For 

, appointment, call 623-4641. 

MALE OR FEMALE 
Supervisor, 3 hours per day, 
3 to 5 evenings per week. 
Phone 464-4971. 

INSURANCE Secretary — 
Insurance agency has 
career opportunity for 
individual interested in 
becoming an insurance 
secretary. Call 425-7220. 



FURNITURE 

UPHOLSTERED — in my 
home. Very reasonable 
rates. Call Mrs. Smith, 464- 
4579. 

REDUCE SAFE 8, FAST 
with GoBese Tablets S> E- 
Vap "water pills", Barr's 
Drug. 



NORTON — 1973 850 Com 
mando, excellent condition, 
mileage 1500, 499 3419. 

MOTORCYCLES — Hondas. 
1974, His Si Hers, XL 75, XL 
100. 1 month old. Under 250 
miles each. $800 8. $575. 428- 
1125. ' 



PUBLIC RELATIONS 
Unusual opportunity for 
right person, attractive, 
neat, good personality. Meet 
exciting people. High in 
come.'Call days 2 to 3 p.m. 
623-7858; nights 490-1749, Mr. 
Green. _ 

REAL ESTATE 
SALESPEOPLE - 
Excellent opportunity with 
aggressive firm on Holland 
Rd. Excellent training 
program and fringe benefits. 
Earn while you learn. 
Anyone can do it. Jackson 
Realty, 490-0555. 



PUPPIES 

(4) small adorable females. 
Free to good homes. 116 
London Bridge Rd. 486-8604. 

RABBITS - Adults and 
babies, also cages. 486 6324. 

ST. BERNARD— Female, 11 
weeks; Male, 1 year; AKC 
registered 545-7483. 

YORKSHIRE TERRIERS - 
AKC reg. 7 weeks. Terms 
considered. Shots. 4900487. 

SlAiddetFotSale 

CAMERA — Bronica 52A2-V4 
SLR, used only once, perfect 
condition, $325. 425 1991. 

INSULATION — Vh" full 
thick. 4.29 roll. Arco Hard- 
ware, 3365 Military hwy. 853- 
1379. 

SlAAntiquet 

OLD ROLL TOP desks for 
sale, « to choose from. 

DESKS, INC 
3411 High St. 399 0979 

52HoiadioMGoodt 

$458.00 delivers 3 room 
outfit. Early American, 
Spanish or Modern. 1st 
small monthly payment 
starts 45 days after 
delivery. Household 
Furniture Corp., 1917 
Lafayette Blvd., near 
corner of Tidewater dr.. In 
Norfolk, Phone 622-4165. 

FURNITURE from Model 
homes. Bedroom or Living 
Room, $99.95; Dinette, 
Mattress set, Recliner, 
Bunk Beds, $68 each; Maple 
Boston Rocker, $45. Easy 

terms. Call Mr. Kay at 623- 

4100, dealer. 



WILL MOVE ANYTHING, 
24 hours a day, 7 days a 
week! Don't delay. Call 
today! 588-4715. 

78 Retort Proptrty-Rent 

HOUSES & 

APARTMENTS 

Available on a yearly or 

short term basis. 

. . DUCKS REAL ESTATE 

323 Laskin rd. 

428-4882 



MOUNTAIN LODGE 

For the large family, 
5 bedrooms, 2 fire- 
places, large screened 
porch, deluxe kitch- 
en with modern ap- 
pliances, lake, boat- 
ing, fishing, hiking, 
recreational facili- 
ties for all ages. West 
of Harrisonburg, Va. 
Write Dah Stickley. 
Jr. Penn Laird, Va. 




38 BatiiieaOppOfta^M 



SPARE TIME BUSINESS 

Owii y<»r own profitable vending burinea. SWK) W4600 month- 
ly eamii^i poidUs is your qnie time (day oi eve.). NO 
SELLING. If Ducted, you will be iwvking company etUblkhed 
locationi. "• ^-'^*^. 

OUR COMPANY IS A SUPPLIER 
OF NABISCO SNACKITEMS. 

R£QUIREMElCra: $1,000 to $5,000 CASH INVESTMENT, 
(lecared by macfttaet and modiaiidte) 

good character, dependable auto, and 6 
to 9 spare hours weekly. Income starts 
immediately! We supply product.machines, 
locations, expansion financini, buy back 
option, and professional guidance. If you 
are sincerely interested in applying for this 
geauine opportunity toward financial 
success, please call or write (include 
phone number) for personal interview in 
your area to: yp robert l Anderson 

WORLD INDUSTRIES INC. 
ExscutJvfSuitt^XS 
1919|a«S2nd Street 
Indtarwpolto, Indiana 46205 
TiNphowlan) ^7-6767 



WANTED 
IMMEDIATELY! 

6 men and women to start 
in good paying job. 

Excellent working 
conditions. Bonuses and 
other company benefits 
provided. 

No experience necettary. 
Wewill train you. 



Caii49«.27«3 



STEREO FIREPLACE BAR 
— Stereo fireplace with 
liquor cabinet, AM-Fm 
stereo 8 track and 
phonograph. Beautiful 
cabinet only 4 months old. 
Paid S3S0. Yours for S250. 425- 
1991. 



52AGanna*«MMg» 

GARAGE SALE 

Rugs, pads, window fans, 
dirtSte set. Boys clothes, 
many household bargains. 
Sal. May 11th, 9 a.m. -5 p.m. 
676 East Coral Key, Kings 
Forest. 



- 



» WMMMIfeRvy 



36ldMWatai 



BA6YSITTERS 
Register and earn extra 
money sitting with our 
agency. For info call «9- 
1623. 



ELECTRIC TRAIN 
COLLECTOR — Retired 
railroad man. Any kind, any 
condition, pay good price. 
54S-6242. 

ELECTRIC TRAINS — 
Lionel, Anjarican Flyer, 
Ives, othart. CMh. 497-4313. 



86PoiSale>^i8iiiitBeadi 

HILLTOP MANOR — 3 
tjedroom ranch, corner lot. 
Call Joe Robinson, 486 4041 or 
464-4839. We trade. Higgins 
Realty, Inc., REALTOR. 

WINDSOR OAKS - 4 
bedroom, 2Vj bath ranch; 
eat-in kitchen vuJih pantry, 
large family room with 
fireplace and sliding door to 
oversi7e patio. Extra work 
•-pace in large 2 car garage; 
20 X 30 It. basketball court; 
large treed lot on cut de sac. 
Call Jim Sawyer, 486-4041 or 
340-3181. We trade. Higgins 
Realty, Inc. REALTOR. 

WINDSOR OAKS WEST- 
PICTURESQUE 
3 bedroom, 2 t>ath ranch with 
family room and fireplace. 
Ellie Talanian, 486-4M1 or 
340-1690. We trade. Higgins 
Realty, Inc. REALTOR. 

VIRGINIA BEACH 
(Borough) — 4 bedroom 
Coionlalt ^arly. poaMtion. 
Zoned Multl family. Call Roy 
Wilkes, 486-4041 or 416-1796. 
We frade. Higgins Realty, 
inc. REALTOR 

96 Wanted Real Ettate 

CASH TALKS 
We buy & sell. Need Homes. 
Call 464 6205. Crowgey 
Realty. 



••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 

% CONGRATULATIONS TO NO. II % 

Top HH^BB I 

Salesmen 

For 

Apitt 

DJk. "Jim" Me^r MNirk Jae^Mon 

WE SEU VIRQINIA BEACH 





® 



^^ REALTY 

ik^Km VA. BEACH BLVD. Mtiiltr IEM.TOIS MLS ^ 

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The Sun-Wadnesday. May 8. 1974-4>agB 15 



Financq/Busine^s/Economy 



nHCONSHMERani 



Some drugs 
work while 

^me don't 

By Peter ^Weaver 

Q. I read soritewhere that many patent medicines are 
worthless. Is this true? T. P., Riverdale. N.Y. 

A. In the old days non-prescription drugs wa% called 
"patent medicines." Now they''^ called over-the- 
counter drugs. According te the - American 
Phdtn^ceutic^l Association (professional 
{Aarinacists) there are 100,000 to 400,000 over-the- 
counlffl- drygs. 

Sometimes they work, sMoetimffi they don't. A 
number of them are heavily advertised. A sp(d(esman 
for ttie American Pharmaceutical Association says 
that mos). pain relievers woiic no better than plain 
aspirit) and that most weight reduction items are 
worthless except those associa ted with a die t and, then, 
it's the diet that usually does the trick. Cold remedies 
may give you some relief from cold synjptoms but 
won't do much to speed up the cwing process. 

Unfortunately, glowing advertising claittf have led 
some peoi^e to expect too much of these non- 
prescription drup. If the drugs are used n^cxially as 
dir^ted (especially with advice frwn a fduirmacist) 
for the condition indicated you can expect reasonable 
results. M(re often than not, the phar^nacy's own 
brand of over-the-counter drugs is just as good as other 
name brands and is usually less^xpen^ve. 



Mind Your M 



oney 



Q. I forgot to remove my married, daughter's name 
from our family health insurance p(dicy until Xoag after 
her wedding. Can I get a rebate Mrs. G. E. H., 
WitBtton Saleftj, N.C. 

A. You can try. But, there's not much of a chance. If 
you have any other children, remember to check with 
your medical insurer to see how long they are covered 
under your family policy. When a child turns 18, it's 
time to make an insurance checkup. In some cases, the 
child is automatically dropped from the family policy 
at age 19 and goes uninsured without the family 
knowing it. Make sure you're adequately covered— but 
not doubled covered— when a child goes to college or 
starts to work after high school. 

Q. How long is an auto manufacturer obtigatfed to 
keq> parts in stock? What about re-built parts at parts 
mide by others than the auto manufacturer? L.T., 
Chicago, 111. 

A. You don't have to get "original equipment" parts 
fw yotfl" car. Equivalent parts made by other 
manufacturers serye just as well and may even cost 



Manufacture^ usually keep parts lac the average 
life of an automobile-^ around seven years. If you need 
a part that's out of stock, the dealer can try the 
regitmal parts distributor and finally Detroit 

R^uilt. water pumps, generators, engines. and the 
like are done by jdab^ who specialize in this type of 
woric. Some mechani^ say rebuilt parts are a good 
buy. Dealers and dismbutors of rebuilt parts can be 
found in the phonebook yellow pages under 
"Automobile Parts." 

Q. Can you get (me, overall insurance policy to cover 
aU your needs at a, discount? P.K., Kansas City, Mo. 

A. Some insuraJKe companies have both life and 
casualty insurance subsidiaries so you can buy various 
policies on a "cm^stop" basis. But, so far, insurance 
laws don't permit one, individual policy to cover 
evaryQiing. You -still have to do comparison shopping 
for prices on life insurance as well as auto, boat, home 
and other insurance needs. 

YOUR 15N1GRGY MONEY :Bef ore ^ou invest in an 
air condUtion^, try to determine how dfidently it uses 
electricity to do the cooling job. 

Some air eondittoners waste more electricity than 
others. Have the air conditioner dealer or contractor 
give you the machine's Btu-per-hour rating (cooling 
capacity) and ttie amount of watts (electricity) needed 
to (^jerateit Divide the Btu's by the watts to get the 
efficiency >ra ting. Numbers should range from S to 10 
fw smaller units and up to 12 for larger units. The 
higher th* number, the less electricity will be used. 

@ King FeaturesSyndicate, Inc., 1174. 

Petsr Wsaver waiccmes qutstioiu fnm nadsrs 
for paaild» ust in his column. Pfeass and lettea 
to him in care-'of VirjMa Beach Sun, 138 Row- 
mo/it Road, Virginia Beach, Va. 23452. 



Condominium 
nwdels opened 



Terry Corporation of 
Virginia opened its 
PemlM-(*e Lake Garden 
Condwniniums residential 
development recently. 
Whea fully competed the 
development at 
IndqieAdence Boulevard 
and WitcMuck Road^will 
contahi ^4 units. 

Eacfr building in the 



l»t)ject will contain six 
models (one, two and tlvee 
bedrooms) with prices 
rangii^^ from $19,300 to 
^,700, Furnished models 
are now available for 
inspection, and sales 
reservations i^e being 

Exclusive agent is 
Pembroke Realty and 
Insurance Agency, Inc. 






'0 

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BtssEn r£alty, inc. 

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4316 Viifinia Beach Blvd. 
iwpnaBmh,U 23462 
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Rose Biaett, GRI 340-9898 Lee O-Wai 3404034 

RENTALS 

^M^k Bia^. GRl 340-5626 

OFFICE 340-9721 




Recession hit^ 
state economy 



*-: 



REVIEWING PLANS for the Chesapeake 
scholarship house at the site of the project 
are (from left) Ted Schlossman, Tidewater 
Builders Association president; Nancy 



McClees, chairman of thejiouse cominittee, 
and Keith and Nelson Davidson of Harnel 
Building Co. 



Builders' scholarship fund 
benefited by two projects 



The Tidewater Builders Association (TEA) will 
oversee construction of two Scholarship Houses this 
year to benefit the TBA's scholarship foundation. 

Tile TBA usually selects one builder firm to 
construct one house each year. Substantial interest by 
builda' members in the scholarship project led the 
TBA to build two houses this year, one in Virginia 
Beach and one in Chesapeake. 

The Virginia Beach Scholarship House will be 
constructed in Green Run by Robert and Frank 
DeMille erf DeMille Homes Inc. 

The Chesapeake house will be built in Georgetown 



Women offer 
insurance class 



The Insurance Women of 
Virginia Beach will 
conduct a four-week course 
in general -UalHiify- rating 
beginning May 22. 

The course will be held 
Wednesdays from 6 to 8:15 
p.m. at Kempsville High 
School. It is co-sponsored 
by the Virginia Beach City 
Public Schools' 
Distributive Education 
Dq>artment. 



Virginia Morrison will be 
course instructor. She is a 
commercial account 
analyst of Henderson t& 
Phillips Inc. and a men^ber 
of the Insurance Women of 
Virginia Beach. 

Additional infcrmation 
may be obtained from 
Lilian Entsminger, the 
group's education 
chairman, at Ke Ham- 
Eaton Insurance Co., 428- 
9161 or 428-7454. 



Montessori school 
moves to new home 



Green Run Montessori 
school has moved to a new 
location hi tte Mini-Mall, 
467 S. Lynnhaven Road, 
and changed its name to 
Montessori Children's 
House. The new tel^hone 
number is 486-1914. 

The school is directed l^ 



Melinda Kicklighter, 
accredited Montessori 
director. 

The Green Run school 
was located in the Green 
Run Clubhouse for 18 
months prior to the move to 
the Mini-Mall. 



PembiHHce courts Apartmenis 

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PEMBROKE COURTS MONTHLY PAYMENTS 
(All utilitiK includfd) 



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2-badroom Type I 
2-badroam Type II 
2-lMdroom Typ* III 
2-lMdroom Typ* IV 

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$190 (king six* bfdroom, full bath) 
$215 (ground floor, IK baths) 
$218 ( upstairs, 1H baths) 
$220 ilargar storaga area, 1H baths) 
$236 (larger living room, balcony 

and kitchan, IK baths) 
$250 (1H baths) 

(1732 tq. ft. big, 2M baths, 
iMalk-in eloaats, 3 patios) 



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Point by Nelson and Keith Davidson of Harnel Building 
Co. 

Proceeds from the sale of the two homes will be 
contributed to the scholarship foundation of the TBA. 
The project makes scholarship awards to Tidewater 
shidents. Eight Scholarship Houses have been built by 
TBA members since 1965, giving inore than 40 students 
the opportunity to receive grants from the foundation. 

Mucli of the materials and labor needed to build the 
homes is donated by TBA member firms. Builders 
provide their services at no cost, resulting in increased 
profits from the sale of the homes. 



The effects of the 
nationwide recession 
combined with inflation are 
also being felt in Virginia. 

In a survey of nine 
business indicators in the 
state, almost all are down, 
accwding^ to the latest 
Virginia Business Report 
published by the Bureau of 
Business Research in the 
School of Business 
Administration of the 
College of William and 
Mary. 

Some indicators ore up, 
but they reflect current 
inflation, said Dr. Leland 
E. Taywick, editor of the 
report. 

Bank debits (checks 
charged against demand 
deposits) were up 20.9 per 
cent in March over the 
same month a year ago. 
Bank debits were up 19.7 
per cent for the first 
quarter of the year. The 
one percentage point 
increase "does not make 
much difference and 
indicates that the volume 
(rf goods and services being 
moved has probably 
decreased," Dr. Taywick 
explained. 

THK SOARING COST 
d money also has affect- 
ed building permits, usual- 
ly considered a lead- 
ing economic indicator. 
Permits were down two 
per cent in March over 
March 1973. Interest rates 
are currently at a record 
level. 

Inflation was responsible 



fm- pushing up the price of 
a market basket for retail 
food 1S.7 per cent in March. 
The market basket report 
was prepared by the 
Virginia Department of 
Labor and Iixlustry. 

Postal receipts were up 
2.8 per cent in March over 
the same month last year 
but down 2.5 per cent iw 
the first quarter. 

Electricity consumption 
fell 3.3 per cent, newspaper 
lineage was down 1.8 per 
cent and water 
consumption fell 4.6 per 
cent. The tliree are general 
economic indicators. 

RKTAIL SALES were 
up 6.7 per cent for March 
and up 13.1 per cent on 



a cumulative basis for 
January and February. 

Ccmipact cart fared well, 
but larger and slandard- 
sind automobiles declined 
sharply in sales during the 
energy crisis. Overall new 
car registrations were 
down an impressive 45.9 
per cent in March and 33.8 
per cent for the first 
quarter. 

Virginia's unemploy- 
ment rate is rising, 
although it is still lower 
than many areas of the 
country. In January, Qie 
imemployment rate was 2.S 
percent. It was 2,7 percent 
in February and 2.8 per 
cent in March. 




wSifSS' 



Nlll. CAVKNDAR 

NKALTOR 

ASSOCIATI 



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CALL42S-3800 

1 1788 Va. Beach Blvd . Va. Beach. Va 



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481-1S69 



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General 

Contractor 

Additions, repairs, 

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References furnished. 

Call 4204466. 




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Electrical Contractor 



FOR 

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SERVICE AND 

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CALL 

497 1035 

24 hr. SERVICE 




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CONTRACTOR 
Rssideii^ 

ladMtiW 
D.E. MitCHELl 
426-7262 



Home Improvement 



Carpeting 



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Custom Made Draperies 

tsi qtMlity, 

GUARANTEED 

INSTALLATION 
346-0114, 3404»« 



General Contractor 


HOME IMPROVEMENTS 

I unit>er nnd building ni.itwial». 
room adolftons. ilorm rto«» and 
windvwi, wall (o wall CArp«t, , 
vinyl siding F/e*- Mtiniatw, 
tefmi 

ItfLLAMAEATWi.lNC 
427J200 


BLACK 
BROTHERS 

Builders 

Home ImproTem^ 

Coitractors 

Garage Bvikters 

Room Addttlou 

Alomloum Siding 

Roofs - Carports 

Kltcbeo RemodellQg 

CALL ANYTIME 
545-7318 

Bag h 1. m^A. St. 
Che^pwfa, Va. 


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LawH Mower Semee ^ 

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428-9029 



PLASTERING 
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Call '' 
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Ph. 855-5370 




Tile 



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Needs Remodelli^? 

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Call 853 7S92 

or 855-3787 

for free estin^ates. 



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486-3430 



spi- 



Piga 16-The Sun-W«ln«day, May 8, 1974 

A student on the School Board? 



Students 'radicar project stirs controversy 



'$. 



J5 






i 



By DONNA HENDRICK 
Sun Staff Writer 

Doug Weeks, a 17-year-old Kellam High 
School junior, thinks a student should be on 
the Virginia Beach School Board. 

Mr. Meeks will be the elected 
rejx-esentative of Kellam High School's 
student body sinoe he is president of the SCA 
for tho 1974-75 school year. But he says the 
current SCA president doesn't agree with 
him about placing a student on the School 
Board. 

He said some students consider his 
proposal a "radical move." Others 
students feel it may "cause a hassle," he 
said. 

"But 1 don't think most of the students 
care one way or the other about it," he 
said. "They just want to get through 
school and get out." 

He feels strongly that a student has a 
unique inside view of the schools and is 
needed on the School Board. He has un- 
dertaken a personal campaign to have a 
student on the board. 

He also thinks School Board members 
should be elected, rather than appointed. 

"A School Board member would 
pr<*ably be more interested in his work if 
he ran for the office instead of being ap- 
pointed by a friend," Mr. Meeks feels. 

SO FAR. HK has tried to learn as much as 
he can about the School Board and how 
members are chosen. He has talked to 



several City Councilmen and candidates 
for City Council, he said. He also has talked 
with some Virginia legislators to seek their 
help in changing the city charter to allow 
election df School Board members or 
chants in the length of their terms. 

There is no state or city law specifically 
barring stwients from the School Board. 
The only requirement to serve on the board 
is a state requirement that board members 
be residents of the locaUty which they 
serve. There are no age restrictions. 

The city charter provides that the School 
Board be made up of 11 members appointed 
by the City Council. Board members serve 
three-year terms. 

The length of the term is one obstacle to 
Mr. Me^' campaign. A very young 
student would have to be appointed to the 
board so he or she would still be in school 
during the three-y«ir term. 

SINCP HE IS not old enough to vote, Mr. 
Meeks feels he maj( not have much in- 
fluence over City Caincilmen who vote on 
School Board appointments. He said Vice- 
Mayor Reid Ervin has been sympathetic to 

his C£IUS6 

He also would like to see a teacher or 
someone with teaching experience on the 
board. However, teachers in the Virginia 
Beach public school system are barred 
automatically because of the conflict; of 
interest involved. 

Board member Reva Kelberg explained 
that a School Board member who is also a 



teacher "would be working for herself, so to 
speak," which would be a direct conflict of 
interest 

Teacher salary ctecks are signed by the 
School Board. "If I were t«iching, I would 
be paying my own salary," she explained. 

Some current members of the board do 
have teaching, experience. Dr. Roy A. 
Woods, Scljool Board vice-chairman, is an 
educator and vice-president for academic 
affairs at N(»^olk State College. Mrs. 
Kelberg is qualified to teach on the 
secondary level and has indicated she may 




DOUG MEEKS 



go back to teaching if she isnot reappointed 
to the board when her term expires. 

A STUDENT MAY stand a better chance 
of getting on the board if board member are 
elected, Mr. Medts feels. But election of 
members would require state legislative 
action to change the Qty Charter which 
now requires that board members be ap- 
ppinted by City CouiKil. 

Two bills, one in the Virginia House and 
one in the Senate, were introduced in the 
past legislative session to allow election of 
local School Board members. Both were 
killed. 

A House bill relating to qualifications of 
school board members also was kiUed. 

School Board Chairman Robert H.Deford 
Jr. would wdcome a student member of the 
board, he said. Mr. DeFord said the board 
now us^ stixlents in an advisory capacity 
on many of its committees. 

"Having a student on the board wouldn't 
be objectionable to me," Mr. DeFord said. 
"Students can provide an insight we don't 
have. I think it's important that we get all 
the input from the students that we can," 
he said. 

MR. MEEKS WANTS the student School 
Board member to have full voting powers. 
He doesn't think an advisory member 
would do much good. 

"Having them as advisory members is 
alright as an interim measure," Mr. Meeks 
said, "but I don't know if the board would 
listen to a student if he were an ex-officio 



member. His vote could be used as a sort of 
weapon." 

He also feels that a high school senior has 
enough know-how to be able to hantfle 
School Board duties intelligently. However, 
at least one City Councilman disagrees. 

"I wouldn't vote for a student," said 
Charles Gardner, at-large City Council- 
man. "Let's face it, they are 
children. I wouldn't vote 

for a child on the School Board 
even it it were my own child. 

"I don't even see how a student would 
have the time to devote to the j<^," be said. 

INSTEAD MR. GARDNER suffiS^sted 
that students interested in tte functions of 
the Sk:hool Board form some type of 
organization, perhaps made Uft of 
presidents of the senior classes of the six 
high schools. That organization could then 
present suggestions to the School Board, he 
said. 

Mr. Gardner feels that the School Board 
would seriously consider suggestions from a 
student organization. 

"For example, we have literally hundreds 
of organizations in the community that have 
input into the city government. 

"The civic leagues are a good example," 
hesaid. "They don't have a vote, but if they 
have a complaint or a suggestion for us, 
they're welcome to make it. 

"I imagine the Schod Board woidd be 
very glad to hear from the students." 



iy.ySSft%SS«i«»fi^^ 



Less growth may slow 
new school construction 



By DONNA HENDRICK 
Sun Staff Writer 

The Virginia Beach School 
Board was asked last week to 
begin thinking of means other 
than continued construction to 
accommodate Virginia Beach's 
student population. 

Although the number of 
students here continues to 
increase, that increase is 
slowing down due to a number 
of factors, Dr. James C. 
Mounie, director of research, 
planning and develc^ment, told 
the board at a special meeting. 

Variables such as the interest 
rate and Uie gasoline shortage 
are affecting residential 
construction and ther^y the 
influx ol new studoits inU) the 
school system. The huge 
migration of new pupils 
expected from closings of 
military bases throughout the 
country has not materialized, 
he said. 

DECLINING TO predict 
population figures past next 
year, ^r. Mounie told the board, 
"It is not our intent to suggest 
that we now know the potential 
impact of the military and 
construction variables. We 
merely wish to advise you of 
what the pupil population is at 
present and will be next year." 

Dr. Mounie asked the board to 
consider several (Options to 
accommodate students in 
overcrowded schools. Even 
with the initiation of year-rnuMl 
education in four schools, the 
construction of three new junior 
high schools to open in the fall 
and the buildii^ of additions to 
two elementary schools, the 
schools still will be 
overcrowded l^ some 5,720 
students in the faUL The school 
are curreirtly ovwcrowded by 
some 8,315 pupils. 

"You will soon be in a position 
to make an informed chdce 
between construction, year- 
round operation and the 
extended day," he told the 
board. "You should be aware ' 
that even with year-round 
qteraUon or the extended day, 
some consM^on will, in all 
probabilityt^ff be necessary," 
he said. 

THE SENIOR high schod will 
be overcrowded in the fall by 
2,546 students, Dr. Mounie said. 
The opening of the three new 
\ junior hi^ schools and the 
transfer of all ei^th and ninth 
grado? out of hi^ school and 
into juniw high will help 
acctHnmodate the students, he 
sakl. 

The stuctent excess also is 
being hatred by the redrawing 
of school boumlaries and the 
redisUibutimi of pcrtable units 
used at many permai^nt school 
■itei, be saki. 

the sdiod system cawiot 
contimie to redraw boundaries 
and me portable units as long- 
term solutions to lugh sdiool 
overcrowding, he said. 

He asked the board to 
consider building additional 
h^ ^Aook, aikUng on to 
cxtotir^ buildii^, extending 
te KhBoi day (w going to year- 
rouod opomtiim at Kaspivilte 
ngb Seted. Wfnt Cohmial High 
Sclsel ni Kdun Hi^ Sdiool 

ADDITIONAL SPACE ^K 
mutt be created on the junor 
h^ In^ he said. Tte san^ 
fo aeraRtnuKbte 
I m^tmtt &mM be 
oatte JulwfeiRb 



will be overcrowded by 1,230 
next year, even with the 
opening of the three new 
schools. 

Dr. Mounie asked the board to 
consider constructing new 
buildings, adding on to existing 
buildings or year-round 
operation at Kempsville, 
Lynnhaven and Plaza Junior 
High Schools. He also suggested 
that Virginia Beach Junior High 
School be renovated. 

The 45-15 pilot program in 
year-round education will 
enable the school system to 
cq)e with the expected 1,944 
excess elementary school pupils 
expected next year, he said. 
That system operates at four 
elementary schools in the Plaza 
area. 

HOWEVER, he told the board 
Uiat it can no longer add on 
portable units to existing 
elementary schools without 
straining support facilities, 
such as cafeteria^, past the 
breaking pdnt 

"It seems tiie only opti<ms 
which might be available (mi 
Uie elementary school level) 
are construcion and year-round 
operation," Dr. Moufete said. "I 
say 'might' becaus^^ data 
from the year-rouni education 
pilot program is not yet 
available." 

Dr. Mounie also briefed the 
board oi several possible plans 
for various areas in elementary 
school neighbm-hoods: 

• Central to west 
Kempsville area: Kempsville, 
Arrowhead, College Park, 
Kemps Landing, Kempsville 
Meadows, Pont of View and 
Woo&tock schools are kicated 
in the so-called "growth 
corridor" of the city 



(essentially contained iri 
KempsvilleBorough) and will 
need an additional building, 
year-round operation of some 
buildings or boUi by 1975-76. In 
addition, Kemps Landing school 
needs to be remodeled or 
replaced. 

• Plaza-Windsor Woods- 
Green Run area: Brookwood, 
Holland, Plaza, Lynnhaven, 
Windsor Woods and Windsor 
Oaks areas need a minimum of 
one additional school even if the 
four schools continue on the 45- 
15 plan and the two others 
(Brookwood and Lynnhaven) 
begin using the 45-15 plan. 

f The "down county" area: 
Court House, Princes Anne and 
Creeds schcids will gain relief 
when the new North Landing 
schoid opens in 1975. Court 
House should be remodeled or 
replaced. 

9 Beach area: Linkhom 
Park, W.T. Cooke and Seatack 
schools should be remodeled 
and enlarged. 

• Bayside area: Bayside, 
Horaitage, Shelton Park and 
Thoroughgood schools might 
benefit from boundary 
adjustments. 

Elementary schools in the 
Great Neck-First Colonial and 
Aragona areas will not require 
additonal space in the 
immediate fiiture. 

The students are not the only 
ones capiag with over-crowded 
conditions. Dr. Mouiue tdd the 
board. He said the school 
administration staff also needs 
additional space. The staff now 
works in eight different 
locations and each of the 
buildii^ "is crowded beymd 
belief," he said. 





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"At last, a paper for wid abmit our 
Virginia Beach. Iliank you. Sun." - E. 
K., Lynnhaven 



"Your paper is just what this city 
needs. I love to read The Sun." - P.S., 
Piingo 

"The Sun is the best weekly news- 
paper I've read in a long time. Even my 
friends in Norfolk enjoy it." — L.M., 
Kempsville 

For home delivery phone 486-3430 




Actors take 
their show 
on the road 



-Paga B-r 

Two teams in 
photofinish 

baseball race 

-Pag9 AS 

JUNIOR JOLLIES are in store 
wt»n the First Colonial High School 
jumOT . class ^ I)reif^Q^>^ $en^ ^ 
lOcetches wiitieA Mj^^B^ituced by 
members of the #K^lt happens 
•rtiursday and Friday at the sehtiol. 
Tickets, available at the dow, are $1.25 
each. 

PINT-SIZED actors in the Virginia 
Beach Departmwit of Parks and 
Recreation creative dramatics classes 
appear in six short subjects and plays 
tonight at 7:30 at Thoroughgood 
Elementary School. The public is 
invited to see the yoir^ actw^ free of 
charge. 

GAMES, rides and a country stwe 
will be featured in a carnival 
sponsored by the Seatack Elementary 
School PTA Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 
p.m. at the school. Everyone is invited 
to take part in the carnival fun. 

Inside 

Two sections 16 P«9« 

Qassified B-6 

Comment -A-Z 

Features A4 

Forum A-2 

Gardming -A-B 

Life Styles Bl to B-3 

Real Estate B-7 

Fteligion -B-S 

Sports A-5 to A-7 




SERIAi^ SFTCTTOM 
VA Vna^ LIBRARY 
RICHMOSl^. VA 23219 



i^ 




^kh^ 



i.ia h 






03 497 3524 



Wedneiday. May 15, 1974 



City of Vireinia Beach, Va. 



COMrtgKtt 1974 



jisaat. 




Machete nomtod 



N^fth*Nn«niin nor snow nw" ghwm of 
night will ^top the mailman from his 
appointed rounds, Init the poor man 
would have to carry a machete to 



hacit 1^ way ihrtNijfh to this mailbox 
spied ami^t the weeds tfft 
Rosemont Road. (Sun photo by Rod 
Mann ) 



Callis plan sees 
more city parks 



Would you like to see a new golf course or 
additional recreational areas in the city at no 
expense to the taxpayers? 

City Councilman Robert Callis believes it's 
possible if the city establishes a recreation 
authority. He says he thinks the city is 
empowered under state law to establish such 
an authority and has asked City Attorney J. 
Dale Bimson to check the law and report back 
to the Council next week. 

"The recreational authority would operate 
like any industrial authority," Mr. Callis said. 
"They could sell bonds to construct a new golf 
course, tennis facilitira and <Aher worthwhile 
recreational areas without the assistance of 
the city." 

WITH THK establishment of a recreation 
authority, the city would net |M*ojects that 
otherwise would be loo expensive for private 
grou|». Yet U» taxpayers wwild also be off 
the hook. 

"We've talked about buyif« Bow Creek 
Golf Course, iar e3&#le. and they say*!haf s 



too expensive, (for the city to buy)" Mr. 
Callis says. "And yet interest rates are so 
tremendous now, who in private business 
coMld afford them?" • 

A recreation authority would be able to 
float 7¥t per cent bonds to finance projects, 
according to Mr. Callis. 

Thou^ he says the city's {Hirchase of Bow 
Creek Golf Course is "not out," he says the 
recreation authority would be an alternative 
where it doesn't cost city tax payers. 

"Besides, I'd much rather see a private 
golf course," Mr. Callis says. "The city 
shouW only come in when the private sector 
rannot meet the demands." He adds, the city 
ean collect taxes on a private golf course, 
where they would be paying out funds to run a 
city course. 

Ifsuch an authority were established, the 
Council would anoint authority members, 
but the body would ncrt come under city 
administration. Though he believes it can be 
done, Mr. Callis knows of no other 
recreational authority in the state. 



OPENS JUNE 29 

Mt Trashmore ceiebratimset 



Closed 

COtMH^ 

The Vlr^Bla Beach City 
C'wncB met MoAiay for 45 
miiwtes lii cXmti t«sloB, 
open w wither the pMblk 
mr ihe pr«sft Tli€ agenda 
Itale^ "app©tat«e»«»" l« 
cminlssiOM «•* • "tofPl" 
matter fwitocwwlw. In l« 
meeltags «• far thh year, 
the C'wiBcH ta« «»* »« •• 
towrs «Nd lhr« mkmim 
bfWad cta^ iMft- 



n's (rfficial. That fwrner smelly pile 
of gartiage known as Mt. Trashmore 
will have its grand openir^ June 29 at 1 
p.m. 

Members of the Parks and 
Recrealiai Commission announced at 
last week's meeting that the new 
recreation canplet, now known as ML 
Trashmore Park, will be almost totally 
completed by the official opening date. 

However, tJ» new iitformation center 
at the complex (located between 
Hdland R<ad, Edwin Drive and Scwth 
Boulevard near the Virginia Beach- 
Norfolk Expressway) will not be 
ewnpleted in lime for the grand 
q}enir%. commissiwi menribers were 
toU. 

Membars decide to delay !Mi<aii«» 
rf the iirformaUon center until it is 
comptetKl It will be ctedieated in late 
September during tte city-wide 
Neptune Festival Numerous 
fHT^tlon evttJts are ptann«i at Mt 
^aMnM« difftii tte festival.. 



TIIF, INFORMATION center will 
future a plaque dedicated to Roland 
Dwer , tl« ma n who had the idea to take 
the city's garbage, dump it in a 
sanitary landfill near the expre^way, 
pour dirt on t^ of it and Iran^orm it 
into a 160-acre recreation site. 

Mr. DOTer is a member of the Partis 
^^d R«:vea|^ Commission, and 
director of the state's Bureau of Solid 
Wsffltes ami Vector Control, 

He, abo e a member of the 
Kem^vilte Ruritan Chib which l»s 
(teveh^ed three artficial reefs ia the 50- 
acre Mt. Trashmore Lake. Club 
members ised 500 oW tir« to buiW the 
reefs in a shaU«w part of the lake. Mr. 
Dorer told commissioners at the 
meetii^. 

The reefs are designed to Improve the 
fishing in the lake, which b slocked and 
will be open to anywve with a state fTWsh 
watw f ishh« license 

(1lMlWiS«i«NKR.H A<iRKKD that 
sailing wwikl be r«triGt^ to the 



smallOl 20-acre lake frontii^ on South 
BoulvaPd, near the expressway, with 
the large Mt. Trashmor Lake r«ar 
Holland Road reserved for the use (rf 
fishers and those who rent the park- 
supplied paddle b(»ts. 

The smaller lake, dubbed Windsor 
Lake by the Parks and Recrratioi 
Department, contains salty, brackish 
water and may also be used for baric 
iRshing. 

I Although roembere of the Virgima 
Beach Ski Club will stage a water skiing 
tournament on Mt. Trishmore Lake 
Airing the park's pawl opening, the 
Me will not be (^en to the puWIc for 
water skiing. 

Mt Trashmore was opened bridly to 
the public last simmer when ll» 16th 
annual Tidewater Soap Bm Derby was 
hefcl on the rewfy-coraUmcted (tertv 
track down the ste (rf tl» mountam. 

This yeAfs deiof will be held two 
weeks after l|e grand opening 
, celelralion. ~ 



^■■■i 



Few protest 
record budget^ 



By DONNA HENDRICK 

and LINDA MILLER 

Sun Staff Writers 

Few persons were on hand at Monday's 
Virginia Beach City Council meeting to 
contest the first reading (rf the city's record 
IS3.8 million budget for 1974-75. 

The budget is up $515,000 from the 
$93,304,005 budget proposed by City Manager 
Roger Scott to a total of 193,819,605. Changes 
in the budget proposal came after Council 
tM-iefingi and budget study sessions. 

Final passage of the budget is expected to 
come Monday with the Council's second 
reading of the budget ordinance. (All 
ordinances which involve mrniey require two 
readings before they become law.) 

ONLY FIVE persons appeared befcre the 
Council at Monday's public hearing - two of 
them to ask the Council to send the school 
portion of the budget back to the Virginia 
Beach School Board with a request for higher 
teacher salaries. 

The school budget has received a $492,200 
increase over the originally proposed budget, 
making school operating funds total 
$42,102,215. 

Increases in the school budget are due to 
higher teacher salaries, costs for research 
and public information, attendance and 
health services, pupil transpcarUtlon and 
operation and maintenance cf school planto. 

The largest increase in the amount 
allocated for teacher salaries and otiier 
instructional costs for regular day schod. The 
Council approved an increase of |475,W0 for 
instructional costs. 

THE aCHOQt BOAM> voted Ust month to 
w»«<nn«xpectedllll^eit»trtaiiro»«w«t5 
cover the added cost of higher twcher 
Salaries 

.RKhard Gordon, executive director of the 
Virginia Beach Education Association 
(VBEA), read councilmen a britf sbitement 
asking them toupgradeteachersalarlce even 
more by increasing the school tmdget by 
$920,151. 

"I understand that only die School Board 
can determine how these funds can be 
expended." Mr. Gordon said, "but, the Clfy 
Council and city manager can make 
suggestions to the board." 

In a letter sent to councilmen e^riier this 
month, the VBEA asked them to recommend 
(hat the addiUonal $920,151 be applied to 
highei>-^cher salaries to raise the starting 
base pay to $8,140. 

Gaynette Winter, unsuccessful candidate 
for City Council in the recent election, asked 



the eouncil to return the school portion of the 
budget to the School Board end^ request the 
board to raise teacher salaria 10 per cwit 

OTHERS ADDRESNNG the council on the 
proposed bud|et were Kent Hackman, 
chairman of the hudget committee of the 
Council of Civic Organisattons (COO) ; Cecily 
Macdonald, CCO planning and lonlng 
develoimient chairman, and I^vid Edchirdt, 
chairman of the Virginia Beach Communlly 
MenUl Health: and MenUl Retardation 
ServieeB Board (Chapter 10 Board). 

Members trf the Arts and Humanities 
Commiulon, who were scheduled to plead for 
reinstatement (rf their original budget 
request, learned prior to the Council meeting 
they are to receive $3,000 more than outlined 
in the orglnal budget 

The Arts Commission requested $12,390 in 
funds when it submitted the budget lliat 
request was cut to^.oao in the city managM-'s 
budget version. After the Council review of 
the budget, however, the commiaaion was 
given $3,000 more, for a toUl of $10,620, still 
$1,600 short of their orglnal requMt 

One Arts Commiaaion monber indicated 
the group is saUsfied with the new amount 
and would not ask the Council (or additional 
funds. 

" AFItm ITS budgets reviews, the Council 
also made additlona and deletioni to various 
city department budgeto. Those changM 
include: 

• a $61,094 budget increase for the Public 
Satiety Department Civil Defense Unit; 

«a $30,814 increase Xta the Parks and 
Recreation Department; 

•a $27,693 IncroMe for the General 
SenrtoM Departaae^i 

• a 1»m imrease for Ow City Council 
budget; 

^a $23,680 increase In the Health 
Department' budget for a c«npi^Mmivt 
mental health program; 

• a $22)730 bucket increase in the Executive 
Department Including a decrease of $206 in 
the Public Information Officer's budget, a 
M.966 decrease in the IntergovemmenUil 
Relations Comtlinator's budget and a $20,000 
Increase for data |HWM8ii«; 

.•a $12,000 budget increase for the highway 
divhiion Community Servicea,' 

• a $9,221 increase in the ttirary budget, 
« a $3,500 increaae for the Social Ser^deea 

Department; 

•a $2,222 increaae for the Juvame 
probation division of the Judicial 
Department; and; 

•a $306 increaae in the city attomoy'a 
budget fw the law departnMnt. 



'King 

of 
Dumb' 




ByCILKSINKX 
Sun Washhigton Bureau > 

WASHlNGTON-The current issue 
of "New Times" magazine features a 
cover portait of Sen. William Uoyd 
.Scott (R-Va.) with the caption, "The 
dumbest Congessman of them all." 

A correspoiKlir^ article, written by 
.staff member Nina Totenburg. lists 
who the author says are the 10 
"dumbest" members of Coi^re^. 
Sen. Scott was revealed as the "King 
of Dumb." 

Another poll, released last year by a 
Kal|* Nader group, showed that 
senate staffers list Sen Scott as the 

"least bright " <rf senators. Sen. Scott 
was also rated at the bottom of a 

•political accountability" poll 
released by the League of Women 
Voters in February. He and Sen. 
William Byrd were one <rf seven 
candidates who received 7.ero ratings 



^N. SCOTT 

from the league. i 

The "New Times' article daims 
thai Sen. Scott is not(M-iou8 fw Ms 
inability to keep a sUff . The Virginia 
senator has had three administraUve 
assistants in the past year. SK^cording 
to Ms. Totenburg. and in the same 
lime she said there have been 
"fourteen chan^" in a staff of 19. 

MS. TtlTKNBl'IKi SAID Sen. Scott 
is the only member of Congress «*o 
must advertise in the newspaper M a 
staff. She cited his comments in 
respoise to a reporter's cpiestion tl»l 
lieing sworn in was the highlight of his 
first y«ir in the Senate. 

Other allegations in tlw article 
rang!* from a slatem«fil thai the 
senator has washed and ifried oW 
paper cHpe to make them reuseabie to 
a statement that only 12 pwH^e at- 
tended a $100 a plate fund-rasier fw 
him in IS71. 






^m 



.^iiAi^tf^^^ 



Comment 



Pagi A-S-Tha Sun-WMbiMdiiy, May 16. 1974 



An editorial: 



Diverse support 



Politics make strange 
bedfellows, as the saying goes, but a 
plan by President Nixon to wipe out 
the Office of Economic Opportunity 
(OEO) has orompted the coaliti<m of 
one of the most diverse groups ever. 

Imagine in the same lineup 35 
governors, includii^ Alabama Gov. 
Geoi^e Wallace, members <rf the 
Congressional Black Caucus, 
Republican Mayor Richard Lugar of 
Indianapolis and Democratic Mayor 
Richard Daley of Chicago. 

There aren't many things which 
c(Mild draw such a diverse group as 
this together, but they all obviously 
Teco&me OEO as an agency which 
can do things for the poor and 
underprivileged that no other 
agency is capable of handlii^. 

MR. NIXON'S PLAN is to wipe 
out OEO and leave it to the local 
governments to pick up and fund 
those programs which officials 
consido* worthwhile. The funding 
would come from local sources. 

Rep. Augustus Hawkins (D- 
Calif.), who is leading the fight to 
save OEO, says giving the kind of 
help which the agency provides to 
tiie poor in a community is a low 
local priority in many areas. Ttiou^ 
the programs are worUiwhile, cities 
seems to have their hands full with 



other projects, sudi as sewers and 
roads. Rep. Hawkins points out that 
abolishing the agency will probably 
kill two-thiitls of the OEO programs. 
The agency admiidstors s<»ne 900 
Community Action Program (CAP) 
operati(xis across the natimi and 
employs 185,000 persons, many of 
whom are former welfare 
recipients. 

CAP INCLUDES sudi things as 
Head Start for pre-school children, 
Follow Through for elementary 
school chilcb-en and other inrograms 
ranging from day care centirs to 
services for the aged in both riiral 
and urban communities. 

By compelling local governments 
to administer the programs 
themselves, Mr. Nixon's plan 
negates the organizational system 
which makes the agency so 
effective. Many leaaders — Mayor 
Daley and Lugar, for example — 
have realized that helping the pom 
can often be done more effectively 
through a Community Action 
Program rather then through the 
traditional City Hall channels. 

If Congress continues to fund the 
OEO, then the agency will keep on 
doing the job that most local 
communities are unlikely to take on. 



-Y sw0ar on a stack of tranaci^ts.. 




iJf 




City side 

ByUndalimef 

Council dilemma 
caused by cats 



. Sometimes it's UAiipr (and unpofNilar) being a 
Virginia Beach City Councilman. Last week 
Councilman Floyd Waterfield was put on the spot 
vtlien it came his turn to vote on an animal 
ordinance that called for confining city cats, as well 
as d(^s. 

Normally, with 11 councilmen there can be no 
stand-off votes of 5-5, but Councilman Curtis Payne 
was absent from the May 6 meeting. The vote was 5- 
4 to confine the cats when Mr. Waterfield's name 
was called to vote. You could feel the tension in the 
room between SPCA hopefuls and cat fanciers who 
spoke against the cats' inclusion in the new animal 
ordinance. 

"You're iBio{^)osed (for re-election). You can be 
la*ave," said one coimcUman to Mr. Waterfield^ 

Mr. Waterfield looked around the room as he 
purred "aye." 



FOR MOST residents of Virginia Beach, the City 
Cmincil electim was over May 7, but one group held 
their own private election Thursday. 

For pre-schoolers from the Montessori Child 
Development Center on Witchduck Road, it made 
no difference which of the incumbents l(»t or what 
faction they rei»'esented in the Council election. 
They elected their own candidates — of their own 
age. The group took a tour of the city hall and its 
(^ration last week and chose their own mayor and 
city manager for the day. Tours for duldren's 
groups, as well as interested adults, are arranged 
through the city's Public Information Office. 



»» < ^****** 



EACH WEEK Cii|r Manager Roger Scott 
delivers a closed meeting statement citing sectimis 
of the Freedom of Information (Fol) Act to allow 
the Clouncil to hol<l a clos^i session the following 
week. Occasionally, he will make a mistake in 
reciting his prepared statement. La^ wedc, as he 
com(rieted his statement he said, "It is requested 
that a vote be taken at this time to prevent the 
{Mresentation of this matter" in closed session. He 
meant to say "to permit the preswitation," 

MT. TR ASHMORE seems to be the coming thing 
— «v«» in childr«!'s bodes. In a recently releas«l 
botk call«l "Save The Earth" Mt. Trashmore is 
featured in a four page story entitled "liking 
ActtMi: tl» Story of Mt. Trashmore." Tbe book is 
Ml ecol<^ handbook fw children writtoi by Betty 
MiDs and Uhstrated by Oarie A. Nivola. 




Letters from 
our readers 




yiNi 



OAVIO M. KAR 



Am I md^mmdmt Neteipapv 



ST Ad MARTIN tK.M. BRITTOH SIMS 



SOMMA UA OUMMER 



JMCSCmOWN 




KilCH nMMMM OOWOMATMW 



'Maalt' controversary 



Sir: 

This letter is in reply to an article in The Sun 
( May 8) referring to Doug Meeks, president-elect (rf 
the Kellam High Student Cooperative Association 
(SCA). The headline stated that there is a "con- 
troversy" regarding his quest to put a student on 
the School Board. If Doug knew all the facts, he 
wwild find that there is no controversy except in 
what he is creating for himself and the students. 
First, Doug has tried to separate himself from the 
SCA. As president, he is the student's represen- 
tative, and everything he does until June 1975 will 
reflect on him, the school and it's administrators. 
As he stated, the students don't care one way or the 
other, so Doiig should represent their wishes and 
dtap it The students have a good reason not to 
care, for, as a whole, we have no friction or 
problems with the Board. And if we do, we have 
many options open to us that D«ig knows about and 
failed to tell. Let's go over everything one by one. 
Doug stated a School Board student would 
provide a unique insight. What kind of insight? The 
student pickedprobably would be a student with good 
grades and one that is popular with administrators. 
Would this sttrient or any other be able to represent 
the black sbidents, the drug user, the potential 
drop-out, tfjtf chronic trouble B|a|ser? A "good kid" 
lacks the connections to carry out such a wide and 
broad set of goals. 

What school would he be picked from? How can 
he or she represent the elementary and junior high 
student? Besides that, he still has to go to school. In 
all, what purpose would he serve? Doug said he is 
mainly interested in curriculum pwAlems. Well, we 
have the Curriculum Committee here at the Beach. 
Every subject area in the BeiSti school system has 
its <wn Curriculum Committee that studies and 
creates the make-up of curriculum. This committee 
is made up of teachers, administrators and 
students in each sub^t area, all who have an equal 
vote. Doi^ is on this committee, appointed by 
myself, for a two-year term. So stud«its have a 
very big voice in ciffriculum, with a vote thrown in 
for good measure 

Doug failed to take into consideration what the 
student would do when required to discuss raisii^ 
tax revenue, negotiating business contracts, 
trachers' salaries and building schools. No student 
has any knowledge in that category. 

Adding one mwe pers<m would create 12 mem- 
bers, making a tie vote possible. And if students get 
re|n%sentat>on, what about bus drivers, custodians 
and cafeteria wwkers? Will they want It, too? 

Doug mentioned that an ex-<rfficio or advis(M7 
member <rf Ite boaitl would not woris. Well, we have 
10 advisory members right now. much alor« the 
line Cwmcilman Charles Gardner suggested. At 
^st once, and many times twice a month, the 
Superintaident ^ Schools. Dr. E. E. BrickeU. 
meets with all the Junlw and Senior Hi^ SCA 
Fresi(tents. Th^ meetings are candid and frank, 
and Dr, Bridtell has never turned a student oft 

From Ih^ meeting, both past and (M-esCTt, 

• rtuitenls pined ctonges in the A^b code, parfc^ 

Ms «m« tMilt, i^Moes were imtalled. stage ctn-- 



Forum 



tains put in and things like the Curriculum Com- 
mittee with students on it were brought to life. This 
gives us even more input, and gives the School 
Board "unique insight." 

Also mentioned was the fact that School Board 
officials would do a better job if they were elected. 
Judges and School Board officials luve something 
in common, and that is they have a j(^ that is so 
important that they £(hould not be put under 
political pressure or forced to run for re-election. 
They should have full time devoted to th^ct of 
^ running the schools and nothing else. 

To get a student member on the board, or to have 
an elected board, requires a General Assembly vote 
for a change in city charter. The Assembly has 
enough trouble passing major bills, without having 
ithe additional burden of changing our charter so 
one student can get on the board. It really serves no 
purpose to hassle them. 

In summary, there is no need for a student voting 
member on the board. The students are happy on 
the whole and aren't hassled a whole lot. We have a 
full vote and say in curriculum, which in turn gets 
to the board. We have a direct line and input for 
ideas to the board with Dr. BrickeU through the 
Presidents' meetings, and City Council through the 
Mayor's Youth Council. It would be impossible to 
pick one student from all the schools with good 
Representation and also impossible for that student 
to be able to participate in most Board action. 

We ha ve an excellent rapport with the board now, 
so why ruin it and make enemies (which this will) 
by fighting for rights and representation we al- 
ready have and that Doug has the power to use? 
None of the city's current SCA Presidents su^wrt 
this idea in the total voting aspect, and I hope they 
continue to make advances next year in the capaci- 
ty they have now" 



Russell Lay 

Kellam High SCA President 

1973-1974 



On dta other hand 



In reference to D<H)na Hendrick's article in The 

Sun (May 8) "Studwit's Radical Project Stirs 

Contrcwersy." I would like to congratulate Mr. 

Meeks for having tte courage and stamina to fi^t 

*^ what he believes. 

Having been a recent candidate in the coun- 
cilmanic election. 1 can personally appreciate the 
tremendous undertaking he has incurred. ^ 

TTiere will be those who say that there is no need 
for a student on'the Virginia Beach School Board, 
that students already enjoy enough say in their 
educational system. It is my contention arei firm 
belief that this is a falsehood. 
f 

A student serving on our city's School Board 
would, in my opinion, be advantageous to the 
citizenry because his ai^intment would not be 
based on political favoritism. A student would be a 
true independent. He will not owe his position to a 
councilman because the student will have per- 
fwmed mthing which had been politically 
favorable to those who serve on Council. 

I believe in what Mr. Meeks represents. His 
proposal is sound. Thrwigh an unrelenting fight 
with the governmental units in Virginia Beach, I 
am confident he will eventually realize his goal. 



PHer R. Joy 



The Sum wA^mtt M huen from in rw^ 
»$. Names nM be wiMttU cm request, but 
f^me incluik yow mim and teie^wK imm- 
ber nritk your letter. Letters ere tut^t tv 
eMiitig to meet new^mper ttyk and ^mce rw 

^I^Tf 19^11 ttt UtIK.' fOfllWI, wm^UUa MeaCm Mint 

136 Rotetmrnl Rd. Vlr^da Bitch, Va. 2S4SZ 




By 

"Seal 
Sims 

Sun Editor 



By any other 
name, it's B.$. 




Being an editor, one becomes acutely aware of 
B.S. - or the "Fake Factor," as writer Arttnir 
Herz(« calls it. It surrounds you everyday in ttews 
releases, political catch-jrfirases and press an- 
nouncements. B.S. is there in redundancy, in 
euphemism, in over-simplication and in 
meaningless non-statements whteh either appeal to 
emotions or somehow manage to associate ad- 
mirable qualities with selfish gain. 

There are numerous examples, such as ex- 
pressing the obvious in the phrase "free gift" and 
the mutually exclusive jargon of "profit loss." One 
particularly obnoxious example is in the television 
commercial for a headache tablet which claims to 
"hit and hold a higher level (rf pain relief." 

The danger of B.S. is. that, as gullible humans, 
we may soon be unable to distinguish between fact 
and fiction, or worse yet, we may not take the time 
to sort out all the gobble of misinf(»mation that is 
thrown at us. 



AS. MR. HERZOG WRITES in "The B.S. Factor 
— The Tteory and Technique of Faking It in 
America," the fake factor has become an 
established part of American culture. "It is brought 
to you in advertisements, communications, news 
stories. It is seen in the design of many products 
and felt in the prices of those products. It is heard 
on talk shows and telethons and pops up whenever a 
station break is announced and commercials ap- 
pear instead. It resounds ... over the Super Bowl 
when jet fighters swoop overhead as though the 
taxpayers Imd demanded this use of planes, pilots 
and fuel." 

Mr. Herzog advocates a solution in which 
thinking persons become radical in seddng out and 
asking what really promotes human ha{q[>iness. 
With a habit of doubting, these radicals should 
demand proof and substance in what they are told. 

When a Virginia Beach city councilman 
presented a position paper entitled "The Right to 
Maintain a Decent Society," no one questioned the 
legitimacy of that inspired title. Drairable 
characteristics were linked with a city ordinance 
which forces drug stwes to place Playboy 
magazines underneath the counter. It was as if 
magazine dealers were fostering an "indecent 
society" on our community. 

THE MARINES' Rifleman's Creed shows the 
extent that such image-conscious thinking can be 
carried. "My rifle is my best friend. It is my life. I 
must master it as I master my life: My rifle is 
human, even as I, because it is my life;" 

There is ego-boosting B.S. in the businessman's 
language. "Bottom-line consciousness" is sub- 
stituted for understanding of profits. "Waste 
management" means garbage disposal. An 
"umbrella solution" is actually the best answer. 

Mention of the word "money" must be avoided, 
esoeciallv when "funds" can be used instead. As 
Mr. Herzog points out, "funds" sound safer. 
"'Investment' is used instead of 'gambling,' and If 
you have any funds left over after 'profit-taking' 
from your 'blue-chip securities,' you can put your 
quarter into the machine at the 'toU plaza.' " 

If we're going to avoid such clap-trap as "the 
wings of man" and the Watergate mentality, then 
Mr. Herzog's hock is a good place to begin. It's 
enjoyable reading, and you come away refreshed 
that someone else has seen through the holes of 
language used for images and not communication. 

Until we've rid the marketplace of ideas of all 
this B.S., we'll continue to get low-level headaches 
from higher level insults to our intelligence. 



How tosabscribe 




Nanw 



Addraa 



J w 



Statt 



Zip 



1Yr.«l() 6Mot.$4.eO() 3Moi.$2.50O; 



■- >. 



-. ( 



Many of our raaden prafer to git 
^thtir parsonal copiet of The Sun by 

mall. .Ri^ie* f I 

If you wi^ The Sun to be maiM 
wMkly to your home or buiineM, mail 
us the coupon and lerviee will begin 
immediatily. 

Mail To: 

Virginia Beach Sun 

Circulation Dapt. 

138 Rosamont Rd. 

Virginia Beach. Va. 23452 



PiMM M«i The Sun To: 



HaSSLES 




.v- . ' \ 



By 

Donna 

Hendrick 



Scenic spots or 
shoppina sites? 



You're sick of hearing about "no growth" and 
"planned growth," right? 

Now that the councibnanic campaign rhetoric is 
ovef V everyone may forget the growth issue. But did 
you ever wonder what "no growth" could mean to 
you personally? 

If you're a Virginia Beach resident from 'way 
back, you remember when driving up Virginia 
Beach Boulevard was like taking a drive through 
the country. 

Natives remember when there was no Hilltop 
North, no Princess Anne Plaza, no Pembroke Mall, 
no continuing traffic jams at Virginia Beach and 
Independence Bouleyards, no Green Run, no 
Faiitield, no Carolanne Farms. 

I'M NOT AGAINST Drogress, and I'm not as 
militant as some people are about growth. I don't 
think we should erect a fence around Virginia 
Beach with warning signs: "Go away. We don't 
want you." 

I don't think someone who has lived here 20 
years is any "better" or has any more rights than 
someone who has lived here 20 months. 

We're all in this t(^ether, and we all need to 
work together to come up with some kind of 
sensible plan for our suburban city. 

VIRGINIA BEACH IS a huge city. There's still 
plenty of land down there in Creeds, Pungo, Back 
Bay, Blackwater and Princess Anne. 

Visualize a lovely stand of trees off the road, say 
son\ewhere in Pungo. Now visualize those b'ees 
bulldozed down, an asphalt parking lot covering 
them and a giant shopping center with brilliant 
li^ts. 

It can't happen in Pungo or Blackwater, you 
say? That's what they said not too long ago about 
the meadows near Virginia Beach Boulevard. 

Take a drive sometime (or walk and save 
energy) to a site in Virginia Beach you haven't 
visited in a while. You may be in for a shock. 

I DID IT last week and was horrified to discover 
that one of my favorite views of the Chesapeake 
Bay is now obliterated by a high-rise condominium. 

There's another beautiful spot off Shore Drive 
by Bayville Farms. Take a drive up First Court 
Road and enjoy those beautiful trees. They're still 
there now, but in Uie future?. . . 

Or try a drive throi^h Chesapeake Beach. It 
used tiybe a ^^py little residential community 
pehihed on the bay. It used to be an undiscovered, 
serene part of town. 

SOMEONE HAS discovered Oiesapeake Beach, 
though, and what used to be a sand dune is now an 
expensive duplex. The beginnings of other duplexes 
are evident aU over that part of the bay. 

Sometime, try a daytime drive through the still 
rural parts of Princess Anne. See those towering 
trees over there? They're lovely, aren't they? 

Now look a little closer. See that sign? It 
probably says "sale" and "available" or "zoned 
commercial" with a real estate company name and . 
phone number. 

In a couple of years, or even less, those trees 
could be transformed into another bank or another 
.mi^ile home park. 

I KNOW ALL the arguments about how wehave 
to keep progressing and how we need all that lovely 
tax money coming in from developments and how 
we n^ more homes and how we need commercial 
establishments to serve the people in those homes. 

But none of those ai^uments makes me feel wie 
JMt tetter when I discover my favorite spot in the 
resort city, the place I used to go to enjoy the 
scenery and contemplate the state of the world, has 
been turned into a hamburger stand. 

1 concede that we need hamburgers, iMit don't 
we also need our quiet spots? 

If you've got a favorite place in Virginia Beach, 

«ie of those out-of-the-way scenic spots, I suggest 

you hurry and visit it soon. Maybe you should even 

'take a iMcture of it for memwies. It may not be 

there tonorrow. v 



The Sun-Wadn«sday, May 15, 1974-Pa9t A-3 



foee/ 



by Rod ■oaii 




School will soon be out and children like 
five-year-old Timmy Gray will be free to 
enjoy the summer days in the sun. In a 



shot taken at Hope Haven Childrert's Home, 
perhaps Timmy is making plans for those 
vacation days ahead. 




tL GOMER 

PVLE 



*( 



"^J 



5:30 PM 



WEEKDAYS 




'POWERFUL FORCE' 



State women's lobby formed 



Women in Virginia will have a 
new voice in the state 
legislature witb the foliation 
of a statewide women's lobby. 

Vera S. Henderson of Virginia 
Beach, a leader of the women's 
rights movement in Virginia, is 
organizing the lobby to 
represent Virginia women on 
issues of marriage and family, 
welfare, education, child care 
and other women's issues. 

Announcement of the for- 
mation of the statewide 
Women's Lobby of Virginia was 
made at a press conference last 
week at the State Capitol. 

"THE THRUST for women's 
rights is not being taken 



seriously in Virginia," Ms. 
Henderson said last week. "We 
need to work at the state level to 
change the laws." 

She explained that the lobby 
will "speak for all women in 
Virginia" and will be a 
"powet-ful force" in the 
legislature. 

She is optimistic about the 
changes for the lobby's ef- 
fectiveness and said she has 
talked to many enthusiastic 
women who have expressed an 



interest in working for the 
lobby. 

While the lobby effort is in its 
org|niiational stages, Ms. 
Hen^rson said it needs the help 
of persons willing to contribute 
"hard work and real research" 
to the effort. 

Persons eligible for mem- 
bership in the women's lobby 
are those who support the ob- 
jectives of the women's 
movement in Virginia, in- 
cluding equal opportunity and 



positions of leadership and 
responsibility in the buBinets, 
academic, political and 
economic life of the state. 

Ms. Henderson, a former 
president of the Virginia Beach 
chapter of the National 
Organization for Women 
(NOW), is a leading women's 
rights advocate. 

Anyone Interested in ad- 
ditional information about the 
women's lobby may write Ms. 
Henderson at 1136 York Lane, 
Virginia Beach, Va. 23451. 







HENDERSON 



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IMMEDIATE 

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PERSIAN RUGS 

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SATURDAY, MAY 18 2 P.M. 

Viewing&Iiupection from 12 noon until auction 

Included are loroe of the finest grades of KERMAN, BOKHARA. ISPEHAN. 
S^OlflS^TlreiZ. BELOUCHESTAN. NATURAL SILK QUME. HUNT^ 
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VIRGINIA'S LARGEST ANTIQUES EVENT 

Tl DEWATER 
METROPOLITAN 



Antiques 
Show 
Sale 



sponsored by 

WOMEN'S AUXILIARY 

NORFOLK 

PORTSMOUTH 

BAR ASSOCIATION 



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THE 



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Noriolk Admission $2.00 With this ad $1.5 0\ 



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Fri. and Sat., noon to 10 p.m. Sun., noon to 6 p.m. 

MAY, 17- 18-19 1974 

Another Fine Bellman Production (301-679-2288) 




weekdays 11 PM 






Features 



A4-The Sun-Wednwday, May 15, 1974 



$2S0 tid€ets for 
'slick' N. Y. mayor 



r- 




New ^ork Mayor Bea^ne's 68th birthday party 
aboard Ihe Cunard ocean liner Queen Elizabeth 2 
was billed as the most elegant bash ever to hit this 
city's social scene. It could have been a catered 
affair from a Phillip Roth novella. 

The showpiece of the occasion was a mammoth 
smorgasbord which ran the gourmet gamut from 
roast pheasnt to pickled herring. Towering 
resplendently above the decorated joint was the 
Cunard caterers piece de resistance— an 80-pound 
niargarint' model of City Hall complete with a 
working clock in its cupola. The sculptor was not 
identified. 

OVKR 1.000 of the mayor's friends bought $250 
tickets to this affair to provide him with the ultimate 
in the thoughtful birthday gift-the liquidation of his 
campaign debt. The men were in black ties; the 
women wore clubhouse chic. 

Two bands alternated continuous foxtrots, which 
were so slow that you could have gyrated around the 
floor with a cane without missing a beat. The 
musicians were careful not to play one piece of 
music that anyone born after 1940 would recognize, 
much less be able to dance to. But then most of the 
mayor's friends seemed to be "gentlemen of a 
certain age " (as the French so gallantly refer to 
women ) . 

1 don't know the accuracy of the campaign charge 
that Beame is controlled by real estate interests, 
but there were more than a few real estate men 
among the mayor's friends. Almost every guest I 
spoke to was in real estate, one of whom 1 
recognized as a biggie in the field 

"ARK YOU a good friend of the mayor's?" I 



What's Happening 
at the Pottery 

Opening Specials 
Everywhere! 



asked. "Yes," he beamed. 

"Are there many real estate people here?" I 
asked. 

"Oh, yes," came the proud reply. 

"Could you point them out to me?" 

"Certainly, my dear," and my new acquaintance 
began to oblige. I'll never know what story I might 
have gotten because just then a 25-year-old version 
of Zsa Zsa Gabor grabbed him by the arm and 
pulled him away purring, "Come my darrlink, ve 
most go now." 

I thought of pulling him back by his other arm, but 
realized that every photographer and televison 
reporter east of the Hudson was there. I pictured the 
next morning's headlines "Women's Libber and 
model in tug-of-war over real estate mogul " Still, 
I'm sorry I chickened out. Lois Lane and Brenda 
Starr wouldn't worry about what .their mothers 
would think. 

TIIK ONLY hard news of the night was the protest 
over the use of a British shin for the party. City 
Council President Paul O'Dwyer boycotted the 
affair because of British reoression of Catholic civil 
rights in Northern Ireland. Pickets across the pier 
carried the same message. Someone threatened to 
blow up the ship, necessitating a show of exotic 
security measures including a contingent of 
frogmen. All this was going on the same week the 
Republic of Ireland was debating a bill that would 
permit married couples to purchase con- 
traceptives. 

The party peaked with the mayor's introduction 

of Bess Myerson so she could introduce him for his 
birthday speech. "She's still Miss America," 



Beame mimiked Bert Parks as the former com- 
missioner of consumer affairs ascended the stage. 
Beame's unraised consciousness toward feminist 
feelings was no shocker; when queried on the 
subject during his campiaign, his reply was, 
"What's (nnsciousness-raising?" 

BUT THIS was no great moment of glory for us 
liberated women either. We could have had the 
most prowoman mayor ever (as well as one sen- 
sitive to the minorities and to the unmoneyed). 
Manhattan Assemblyman Al Blumenthal put his 
career on the line back in 1966 leading the fight for 
legal abortions in New York state (the liberalized 
law passed in 1970). This was years before 
Women's Lib was fashionable cause, years before 
it was an organized cause. 

But when Blumenthal made his bid for the 
mayoralty last year, only a handful of this city's 
'multitude ol feminist activists were visible in his 
campaign. And the thousands of working women in 
this town who now schedule their abortions on their 
lunch hours were much too busy to work for 
Blumenthal 

So we have miracle margarine and male 
chauvinism in city hall. I still wonder about that 80- 
pound margarine statue though. Would Beame, 
known for his thrift, let it all melt down the drain? Is 
it being stored in some giant city freezer for the next 
municipal gala? Or does the mayor ask Mrs. Beame 
over breakfast, "Pass me a pat from the left wing, 
dear." 

But what really worries me is Beame's $41,000-a- 
year press secretary. If he slipped up on margarine, 
what's going to happen on the sticky issues? 



Military begins 'to 



^^-^-.f 




• • 



Ughtfoot — This Is what has 

happened at th« Poftery In the 

last two months. The Candle 

Shop, Print Shop and Mexican 

Shop have nrioved and 

expanded. The lead crystal 

and brass shop has expanded. 

Also the stemware, china, 

Import, brandy terrarluna, 

apothecary, tableware f^^st 

and dry flowers, have all 

moved Into our new building 

across, the tracks and 

expanded In size. 



We have also added a new </i 
acre greenhouse next to our 
new building with domestic 
and outdoor plants. 

CX<r new restaurant will be 
opening soon with a cttaesa, 
wine and candy shop, which 
will have domestic and 
Imported merchandise. 

Come visit us soon and save 
with our opening specials on 
merchandise. 



• •■••■•■§•"•••■•■•■•:•:•:•:•-•■•:•:•'• 



If you hear loud booms and 
shell bursts next week in the 
area of Camp Pendleton, we're 
not under attack. 

It will bethesounds of aerial 
firing conducted by a National 
Guard Reserve unit from 
Norfolk on its annual training 
outing at the State Military 
Reservation (Camp Pendleton). 

The reservists will be firing 40 
mm shells from tanks on the 
beach. The targets will be radio- 
controlled target planes flying 
over the ocean near the 
reservation. 

The shells will not actually hit 
the planes (they're too ex- 
pensive to destroy, a National 
Guard spokesman said), but 
hits will be recorded if the shells 



hit a certain target area behind 
the planes. 

TMKRK IS NO danger to the 
public, the spokesman said, 
because the firing will take 
place in a restricted area off the 
reservation. 

If any wayward ships happen 
into the area, firing will be 
suspended. Look-outs are 
posted at all times during firing. 
Red flags will be displayed on 
the beach, and no firing will be 



conducted during periods of low 
visibility or during darkness. 

The danger limits of the firing 
zones are marked with U.S. 
Coast Guard orange and white 
vertical striped bouys, and 
white warning lights will JIash 
during firing. 

The firing will be conducted 
starting Monday, through May 
24. Additional firing will 
be May 28-31. Hours for 
both weeks are 8 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m. 




ACROSS 

I. Rickenliacker. 
for one 
RfthlpM 
— down, 
minimize 
Crony 
Reverberalr 
Underdunp 
Pay for Uie 
flchiKilinir of 
Cheer (up) 
Foam 
Exude 

20. Be sorry for 

21. Front surface 
Yielded 
Cupidity 
Advanced 
decree: abbr. 
Bitter herb 
3ay« an Ave 

29. Rower 

30. You and me 

31. Roundi, aaof 
a race 

32. Set on Are 

33. Have faith 
36. LarRC barrel 

36. One of the T 
deadly aim 

37. Great' abjru 

38. Dodge 

40. More burly 

43. Unexploded 

44. Mince 
In—, 
aaunder 
Lewd lo<»k 
Pale 
Six or mors , 



4 
R 

12. 
13. 
14 
IS. 

17. 
18. 
19. 



24. 

25. 
•». 

27. 
28. 



DOWN 

I. Gibbon, for 

one 
:;. Bounder 

3. Hard to gtmp 

4. Prepare 

5. Opera division! 

6. Pronoun 

7. Westward — ! 

8. Valued hicfaly 

9. Tennis pro. 
Rod — 

10. Exist 

11. Stronic desire 

16. Clever: sharp 

17. SwacthcarU 

19. Minds 

20. Delay 

21. Speechify 



21. Flippant 

23. jBain as proSt ' 

24. Food : steiif 

25. Extra 
benefit: slang 

28. Annoyance 

29. Equips 

31. Impede 

32. Lartett part 

34. Permission 

35. Thickly furred 

37. Talk effusively 

38. Buildioc wing 

39. Compete 

40. Owns 

41. Ram's mau 

42. Twaddle: 
slang 

44. Cry of 
trinmph 



45. 



46. 
47. 
48. 



P^fk South could be 




Lots of people are buying beach 
condominium homes. 

But only a very few, very smart 
people will actually be living in 
their new homes this summer. 
You could be one of tteflfe 

And you could be .spending 
less. Becau-se Pacific South 
offers unlimited luxury at the 
lowest cost per square foot of 
living .space. Check prices. You 
won't be able to duplicate the 
$23,000 to $53,000 price range 
available at Pacific South. 

Think about it. Better still, 
come see the condominium homes 
complete and ready for your 



inspection at Pacific South. 
Check room sizes. Compare floor 
plans. Marvel at the view from 
oceanfront picture windows. 

But don't ««# too long. Three 
out of four of sH our honje units 
already belong to someone. 

WCIFC SOUTH 

."ilh and Pacifit Avenues 
Virginia Bearh 

Snlex oflTu'es and model units 
Often on (iremises. 
lOam to 4pm weekdays 
I Dam to .5|>m weekends. 



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Solution on page B-4 

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IIOIIOSO 




Fimn 

May IS 

to May 21 

ARIES: (Ibrch 21 to April 
If - AIM Ariw AMCBdant) - 
Give attcntkm tofinanccf and 
■ccounti — tie up loow ends. 
Stay on top of all anrnnunica- 
tk»8. aittWcring letten and. 
phone calki pronvtly. Curb 
teritoicy toward sarcasm. Be 
gentle with discipline at 
home. 

TAURUS: (April N te May 
II — Also Tanras AscendaBt) 

— Personal projects could 
now pay off. Use M^ vitality 
to forward your ambitions. 
Give time and attention to 
money matters — revamp 
budget where necessary. Con- 
trd your erocAimss and get 
enougti rest. 

GEMINI: (Mi^ 21 to June 
29 — Also Gemtai Ascendant) 

— Some fondest dream can 
come true now. Your past ef- 
fnts appear to peak out now 
and diarm and chariana are 
high. Your success may spark 
envy in others — be under- 
standing. Possible new 
friendship. 

CANCER: (June 21 to July 
22 — ylJso CancCT Ascendant) 

— Take time out now to re- 
view past accomplishmoits 
and future goals. Make plans. 



Remodding your home coidd 
be occupying your time. 
Utilize old materials and fur- 
nishings in unkiue ways. Be 
creathre. 

LEO: {3xks a te August 22 
— Also Leo Asemdant) — Ac- 
cent is Ml frioids and associ- 
ates. Popularity vaa hi^. 
Associate with those in au- 
Qiority and |»-estigious por- 
tions, l^e part in community 
projects, activities. Be 
prompt, well groomed, pa- 
tient and considerate. 

VIRGO: (August 23 to Sept. 
22 — Also Virgo Ascendant) — 
New people and situations are 
coming into your oivironment 
now. Be considerate and hard 
workii« on the job. Social life 
picks up too. Good time to im- 
prove your mind, undertake a 
new study, buy bocdcs. 

LIBRA: (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22 

— Also Libra Ascendant) — 
Early this week take time out 
to rest and rediargfe your en- 
ergies. Travel or communica- 
tions are accented now. A 
good time to settle any legal 
affairs fawaldy. Improve 
skills wiQi a stu<fy program 
now. 

SCCmPIO: (Oct. 23 to Nov. 
21 — Also Scorpio Ascendant) 

— Be logical, not emotional, 
regarding current (x-ojects. 
Good time to start a study 
program to increase profes- 
sional abilities. Avoid argu- 



ments with mate or partno* — 
be firm in decisions, but kind. 

SAGirrARIUS: (Nov. 22 to 
Dec. 21 - Also Sagittarius As- 
cendant) — Ihis ^ould be a 
week to remember. Fulfill- 
ment of fondest wishes, 
honors and limelight shower 
on you. Finances are favored 
aiHl important decisions may 
be reached. Be supporth^e of 
others. 

CArai(X>RN; (Dec. 22 to 
Jan. If — Also Caprieora As- 
cendant) — (Concentrate on 
work and service areas. 
Those in authwity favor yoUi 
Resist negative or pessimistic 
attitudes. Work on ideas to 
amplify procedures making 
business matto? runjnore ef- 
fidently. 

AQUARIUS: (Jan. 20 to 
Feb. 18 — Also Aquarius As- 
cendant) — Romance is in the 
air — with exciting, emotional 
changes. Social contacts, 
travel and relations with op- 
posite sex are all accented. 
New responsibilities* chal- 
lenges and contacts are em- 
phasized. 

PISCES: (Feb. If to March 
20 — Also Pisces Ascendant) 
—Hunt for the bargain in real 
estate matto-s. Use logic, not 
emotion, in making decisions. 
Tap your sul)Conscious for 
ideas, inspiration tliat could 
pay off financially. New love 
affair for some Pisceans. 



Strictly 
Personal 

Mather predicts future 
by reading the tea leaves 



By PAT and 
MARILXN DAVIS 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

I'll bet you haven't heard this one. My 
mother drivks tea, which is fine, but she 
also reads the leaves. She'll ask someone 
to have a cup of tea and then read the 
leaves. 

My boyfriend was over a couple of 

days ago and out came the tea. He drank 

a cup to be polite and then Mom told him 

that he was going to get a traffic ticket. 

On his way home, he did. He called me 

and said, "What kind of a nut is your 

mother? I just got a ticket." What can I 

do about Mom and this obsession with 

tea leaves? 

Sally 

Dear Sally: 
Suggest she switch to coffee. 

I>ear Pat and Marilyn: 

Wten I come home from work all my 

wife does is complain about the kids or 

dive headlong into some boring 

monologue <m a subject which is of 

interest only to her. I'm bored and want 

a little spark put back into our 

marriage. My wife reads your column so 

give her a few suggestions. 

Tom 

Dear Tom: 

Keep in mind that it takes two to 
spark! A good marriage doesn't just 
happen. You have to work at it. 

After the kids are in bed, have a talk 
with your wife af# tell her exactly how 
you feel. Constructive, honest 
communication is essential. By the way, 
how long has it been since you took your 
wife on a weekend vacation? 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

I'm a senior in high school and have 



been dating Carl for six months. At first 
we haffl a lot of funf We went places and 
did things but lately Carl has only one 
thing on his, mind. How do I handle this 
and how can we get back into our good, 
old relationship? 

Peggy 

Dear Peggy: 

This is one reason I am against going 
steady. It is human nature to go a little 
further as you spend more and more 
time together. But if you insist on dating 
only one person, set a few guidelines for 
yourself. Don't just sit around. Plan a 
definite activity for each date. 

Don't allow necking and petting to be 
your favorite indoor sport. Bowl, swim, 
play tennis, participate in group 
activities and continue saying "NO" like 
you really mean it. 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

I have a friend and considered her to 
hie one of tlie most genuine people I had 
ever known. We are both married, work 
in the same, office, and have many 
common interests. 

A couple of weeks ago she showed up 
with a new diamond ring which is at 
least a couple of karats. Everyone in the 
office was impressed, and we all 
wondered how she could afford such a 
large diamond. Well, her husband told 
my husband it was a phony which cost 
about $200. 1 feel my friend is cheating. 
What do you think? 

Martha 

Dear Martha: 

I think it is none of your business. 
Wearing a counterfeit diamaa4idoes not 
indicate a lack of sincerity. 

Strictly personal will be glad to consider your 
question. Write: Pat and Marilyn Davis, Virpnia 
Beach Sun, 138 Rosemont Road, Virginia Beach, 
Va. 234S2. 




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Beach to hold S nOVtS 



track meet 



World track records will not be threatened, but 
the track stars of tomorrow may be msdiing their 
(tebut Friday. The eleventh annual Virginia Beach 
Physical Education Track Meet is schechiled for 
Friday at Kellam High School. Starting time is 5:30 
p.m. 

Eighth, ninth and tenth grade girls and boys frohi 
all Virginia Beach secondary schools will compete 
in the meet. Participants will face students in the 
same physical education grade level to which they 
are presently enrolled in. Ribbons will be awarded 
to the top four finishers in each event. Students 
participating in the event may not be members of 
school track and field teams which compete in- 
terscholastically. 

The scheduled events for the track meet will 
include the long jump, high jump, shot put, low 
hurdles. 100-yard dash, mile run, 440, 880, 220, 880- 
yard relay and 440-yard relay. 

in case of inclement weather the meet will be 
May 24. 

Youngsters 
to test fitness 



There is a theory that track talent is born not 
made. The local unrefined, uncoached talent will be 
on display this week. Nearly 2,000 Virginia Beach, 
fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh graders will 
demonstrate their swiftness afoot at the 16th 
annual city-wide Physical Fitness Meet. The ac- 
tivity will start at 10:30 a.m. at Cox High School. 

Boys and girls will compete against members of 
their own sex and grade level. The 50-yard dash, 
shuttle run, 600-yard run-walk, standing broad- 
jump, jump and reach and the rope skip will be the 
areas of competition. The boys will also compete in 
a pull-ups event. 

Contestants for the track meet were determined 
through eliminatiort meets held at each city school. 
Participation is limited to one event per student. 

Ribbons will be awarded to the first five places in 
each event. A team champion will be named on 
each grade level with a plaque going to the school 
accumulating the most points. A special plaque will 
be presented to the school, posting the highest 
combined point total for all grade levels. 

In case of inclement weather the meet will be 
held Friday. 



JJj2&iiMJtodnj^y^May15J97^M^^ 



Golf Notes 

Taylor foursome 
takes tournament 



The Redskins may have been 
a loser in last season's NFL 
playoffs, but Charley Taylor 
came up a winner on the golf 
course Saturday. Taylor's 
foursome captured the Florida 
four-ball match at Red Wing 
golf course with a nine-under- 
par 63. The golf tournament was 
part of the "Redskins Remem- 
ber Lombardi" weekend, which 
concluded this past Sunday. 

The tourney ended in a four' 
way tie for first place, but 
Taylor's quartet was awarded 
top honors in matching cards. 
Taylor's group toured the front 
■ nine in six under-par 30 fashion. 

Bill Xallahan, playing with 
Taylor, made it a clean sweep 
for his team, taking the closest 
to the pin competition. Callahan 
carded a birdie two on the 180- 
yard seventh hole after placing 
his drive four feet from the cup. 

Foursomes led by Redskin 
offensive co-ordinator Ted 
Marchibroda, safety Brigg 
Owens and flanker Roy Jeffer- 
son were the other teams tied 
at 63. 



The weekend was sponsored 
by the Norfolk Sports Club to 
raise money for the Lombardi 
Cancer Research Fund Center 
Georgetown University. About 
30 current and past mertibers of 
the Redskin organization 
participated in the festivities. 




TAYLOR 



House bums Red Wing 
with course record 66 



Club pro Jennings House 
served notice to golfers seeking 
the Stable Open gdf tournament 
title that they will be steiving 
on unfrien<fly grounds. House 
shaved a stroke off the course 
record he shared with Ue 
Trevino with a six-under-{»r 66 
at Red Wing golf course on 
Thursday. The State Open will 



be played over Uie par-72 Red 
Wing course in late June. 

Playing in the rain with 
Jimmy Ellis, Dave Bellman and 
Don Potter, House birdled four 
of the first eight holes. House 
also birdied the eleventh hole 
before closing his recordnsetting 
round with a rush with birdies 
on the final two holes. 



Two goH Uwrneys set 



The «%ather is improving and 
with the season golf tour- 
naments start aomm up. 

The fourth annual Ladies' 
Virginia Beach Amateur golf 
tournament is srt for June 3-5 at 
Kempsville Meadows Country 
Club. Defending champion 
Martha Smith and two-time 
winner Ui P«mer htmi the 
field. 

On Uie men's front, ttie 2l1h 
annual Payton Memorial Golf 
■nwmament will be jrfayed July 
2-3 over the Cavalier Cwintry 
CbA Cowse. 

Entry forms have bera tmt to 
colleges in Virginia, the 
^s^mi- Md Attartic Co.* 



Conferenced and to colleges in 
the Washington-Baltimore 

area. 

The field will be limited to 160 
entrants. Skip Dimniway, of the 
Univa-slty of North CaroUna 
was the l»73 tourney chamfwon. 



Somers holes aca 

Phil Somers beat the rain and 
darknras for his first I»le4n- 
one. He carded the ace with a 
five-wood shot at the Cavalier 
Yacht and Country Club on the 
fifth hole. Somers' playing 
I»rtow8 ira* G««Mie Hoey and 

Tim Foley. 



Kempsville catches Bayside 



Kempsville made an amazii^ recovery. Given vp 
for drad after a miserable 1-2 district start, the two- 
time defmding state baseball champions came all 
the way bade. . 

The Chiefs forced a plavcrff with Eastern District 
co-leader Bayside with a 12-1 win at 
Princess Ann Tuesday. The latest success in the 
Chief's resurrection pushed their win streak to 
seven. 

The two teams finished district play wiUi iden- 
tical 8-2 marks. A pne.game playdf to be played 
Thursday or Friday at neutral field yet to be 
determined will decide the Eastern District 
champion. Probable pitchers for the contest are 
Bayside's Marty Moore (5-2) and Kempsville 
southpaw Bob Harrison (6-1). 

BAYSIDE CLINCHED at least a tie for the title 
with a 3-0 whitewashing of Cox on Monday, putting 
all the pressure on the Chiefs. Kempsville forced to 
play with their backs up against the wall for much 
of the season delivered at the crucial time once 
again. — 

The key to Bayside's important win was lanky 
southpaw Craig Wiesner. The talented hurler 
shutout the Falcons on three scattered hits while 
going for three at the plate himself. 

Cox started Mark Ho(fees matched zeros with 
Wiesner through the first three inning. The 
Marlins had two-out runners in scoring position in 
the first and second innings, but Hodges had the big 
pitch when he needed it. 

Wiesnel" faced only the minimum nine batters 
over the first three innings, registering four 
strikeouts. The Falcons only baserunner in the 
opening innings was promptly picked off by 
Wiesner. 

THE MARLINS broke through against Hodges in 
their half of the fourth. Wiesner started the inning 
off with a lead-off single through the middle. One 
out later reliever Jack Ferrell moved Wiesner into 
scoring position with a base on balls. 

Leftfielder George Tyner gave Wiesner the only 
run he needed with a line drive single to right to put 
the Marlins on top 1-0. Bayside ran themselves out 
of a big inning, however, when Tyner was nailed at 
second and the Falcons completed an unusual 
double play with a put out at the plate. 

In the fifth inning. Cox threw the ball everywhere 
in the field of play except to themselves. The 
shoddy exhibition of fielding soit the Marlins to 




BAYSIDE'S GEORGE Tyner (8) finds Cox 
second baseman Matt Payne waiting with 
the ball as Tyner arrives at second base. 

their crucial win. Bayside scored two important 
insurance runs on only one hit. 

Stan Tarketiton started things off for the Marlins 
with a clean single back through the box. Gary 
Lane sent Tarkenton scampering home with 
Bayside's second run with a hit that didn't travel 
more than three feet in front of the plate. Attemp- 
ting to sacrifice Lane bunted the ball down the third 
base line. Cox catcher John Koehler's throw went 
much further, sailing deep into the right field 
corner. By the time the errant throw was retrieved, 
Lane had stationed himself on third with a stand-up 
three-base error. A bouncer to short brought home 




,u:*^^i*» 



BAYSIDE'S ROY Lohman (1) tries to scwe 
all the way from first on a George Tyner 
single. Lirfiman's gamble did not pay off as 



Cox catcher John Koehler made the put^nit. 
(Sun ph(rto by Neal Sims) 



Seadi golfing dynasty 
intact with Ctiiof victory 



Virginia Beach — The World's 
Largest Resort City - can also add a 
footnote — high school golfing power in 
Virginia. 

For the fifth ronseci^, year, the 
Eastern Region title founff *» home in 
Virginia Beach. Kempsville was a two- 
stroke victor to take the regional title for 
the third time in five years. The Chiefs 
were regional titlists in 1969 and 1970, 
capturing the stat^Ue the second Ume. 

The Chiefs will nbw go on to ttie state 
tourney with regional runner-up 
Lafayette. The two-day 364»le tourney is 
scheduled for Monday and Tuesday at the 
Keswick Golf Club in Chark)tt*svUle. 

THE REGIONAL RESULTS flrought 
down a curtain on a high school golfing era 
in Virginia. Princess Atme's ftfth place 
finish eliminated the Cavaliers from sUte 
title conslda-ation. The Cavaliers are the 
only team to win the state gdflng title two 
consecutive years. Their 3M team tot»l 
broi«ht an end to the Princess Anne 
golfing era. 

Like the district tournament the 
previoiB week, the regional toiffney was 
marred by inclement wcattier. For the 
second successive week, the scores 
reflected the battle with ttie elements. No 
one in the field of « golfer matched par. 

R^«- Savage, as he has all season, l«l 
tl« Chiefs in their charge to the top. 
Savage carded Kempsville's low in- 
divi<faal soM-e with a six-over-par 78. 

Savage's excellent round did mrt Mim 
him toumameit raedalirt h«»rs. That 
went to HamfAon High School so|*omore 
Tim Baker wltti a tKWH>ver-i»r 74. Oscar 
Smith's Boblqp tamm grabb«l the nnner- 
up ^»t with a four-over pw toUl of 76. 

SAVAGE AND PRINCESS Anne's 
^kfmlng Indlvidi^ cbmnpiwi RI^B^ 



Tucker tied for third position. Bayside's 
surprising Don Newhart continued his fine 
play with a ftnirth place finish with an 18- 
hole t<rtal of 78. 

* The individual scores posted by TiKker 
sM Newhart earn^ the two-city golfers 
individual berths in the state tmimament. 
Tucker won Uie state indBvidual title last 
year while playing as tte number four- 
man on the Cavalier's champtonship 
squad. Newhart is following Ti«:ker'8 lead 
this season. He has qualified for the 
regional and sUte toMfwment with ex-? 
cellent back to bae* perfornSiwW^ 
Newhart spent tl» year in the numbor 
three stot for the Marlins. 

So{A(»nore Tommy Oillen was another 
key in the Chief's re^mal victory. 
Kempsville's number four man posted his 
team's second lowest aeon touring the 
Newport News course in seveioveriw 79 
fashion. "Cullwi had an early tee time. I 
was especially pleased when be came in 
with a 79," said K«n|»viUe Coach Bob 
&-aun. "I thoi^ht we were in pretty good 
shape If the oflwn played reM«ial*r 

weU." 

The Kempwrille te«n did tai |Jay th«r 
b^ golf of the ^, but it was good 
ratough for ttie victory. Teamii* with 
Savage and (M\ea, were ^k>r Jimmy 
Baltew and scmlw K«7 Drtlun. Ballew 
carded an 83 while DeMun came home 
with an 87. Cta • *»y n*«i aU Uie 8cor« 
wwe high, the effort |wt»ved to be aaifja. 

THE WIN WAS especially swet «w the 
Chiefe. Prince« Abb* t»A edged Kwvi- 
ville l9 a single stroke m the last bcrte a€ 
the 1973 ra^toMl. 

aty titltet Kdm Imistnred but Mill did 
not regain Uieir f«Bi cto^J^ at the city 

tourney. The Knitfrts ported the towest 
team total in the area, taigng ttie city tiUe 



with a four-over-par 292. The Knights 
slippied to fourth in the district wiUi a 
team total of 345. Kellam found the 
Newport News course more to their liking, 
but their sq^lfcof 331 was rot good enough 
to earn them a state qualifying berUi, 
placing them third in the regiwial f ieW. 

None of the KnighU mmaged to crack 80 
for their day's efforts. Billy Woolard and 
John Dozier prated identical SO's to lead 
Kellam's third place finish. Tommy 
Hardee and Artie Watkiri«'1wsted SS't to 
complete Kellam's scaring. 

PriM»ss Anne had an even rougher day 
on Uie links with Tucker's 77 being the only 
score in a competitive range. Mike 
Flentek<83), Bob Peters (») and Rich 
Rdlbesy (90) rounded mit the Cavalier 
effort. 

Eastern District champion First 
Cokmial faded in the regional tournament. 
The Patri<rt8 flntahed slxOi wltti a teem 
total of 342, First Cotonial's effort was 
marred by the amtrovCTsy surrounding 
the eligitHlity of Uieir number one player 
ReyiMilds Dawson Dawson was ruled 
ineliglWe by the Virginia High School 
League for comp^ing in an outtfde 
toumamimt while the season was In 
progress. The deciMon was reverwd by 
the Eart«ii DteU-ict inrincipals a^ 
Itewsim sou^t an injunction in court. 

Whether bothered by the swirling 
controversy or n^ Dawson posted a 
medwcre K. Bill Cole (84). Ricardo Britt 
(86) and John Saunders (87) doomed the 
PatrkM to their sixth place r^ionaJ 
finish, ftltt had laten the Eastern ENMtet 
medalM horn^s the jM-evious week. 

Mtn Andenwi was Uie oUiw tocal 
golfer oMnpetlng in a» r^bnal twm«y. 
The young Bayskte ^Ifer, comp^ing ta 
his fir* rcgknal tomamat. failed to 
move Into coat«irtk» carting a 93 




1>ner had just driven in the Marlini flnt 
run with a line single to right. ( Sun photo by 
Neal Sims) 

the final Marlin run as Bob Needham's throw to the 
plate was wide and skidded by Koehler. 

Over the same period, southpaw Wiesner was 
throwing nothing but strikes. Between the third and 
fifth innings, he retired seven of the nine Falcons he 
faced on strikes. Throwing both the fastball and 
curve consistently for strikes, Wiesner finished tlw 
contest with 11 sb-ikeouts. 

SIDELINES 

By 

John ' 
Baimen 

Spertildlter 



VHSL rulings 
hurt players 

Carry me back to old Virginia. 

There is one word in that saying that is applicable 
to the governing body of high sdiool sporte in the 
this state-the Virginia High School League 
(VHSL). The word is old or archaic maybe. 

Last week's controversy over First Colonial 
golfer^Reynolds Dawson's eligibility just anottor 
example of how out <A touch with the purpose of 
high school sports the VHSL has become. 

THE RULERS of high school sports decreed 
Dawson ineligible for the Eastern Regional golf 
tournament for participating \^ the Virginia State 
Golf Association's Team Match in Suffolk. The 
ruling was later overturned by a 3-0 vote by the 
Eastern Distrj^t principals' executive committee. 
Dawson playl|d in the regional and shot an 85. 

The executive committee should be commend^ 
for its action in overturning the VHSL ruling. The 
point is, however, why should Dawson have to go 
through the hassle in the first place? Afterall, the 
tournament was an amateur event for which he 
received no compensation. A claim many a star 
high school football player could not making after 
choosing the college he plans to attend. If Dawstm is 
good enough to compete against better amateur 
competition why shouldn't he be allowed to on his 
own time? The NCAA would not lo<* on Dawsra's 
action as affecting his eligibility in college. Why 
should the VHSL look upon his action with righteous 
indignation? High school sports are for the studmts 
not the rule makers. 

If Dawson's case was just an isolated examine, 
one could overlook the VHSL's actiwi. Unfo-- 
tunately, it i|pit. There wiU be a state all-star 
baskettell this summer in Roanoke. For the past 
two years, high school basketball in Vir^iUii has 
meant one thing — Moses Malone. 

The gifted athlete from Petersbiarg Hi^ Schod 
will not be competing in the all-star contest. The 
VHSL has ruled him inellgil^ because Malone had 
the desire to play against jpme of the b^t Mgh 
school basketball players in the country^ He par- 
ticipated in an all-star contest at Crtd Fl^ Housfc-^, 
in College Park Md. and the Dapper Dan Classk: in 
Penroylvania. 

FUNNY THING— Malone played before a packed 
hoiffie in Cole Field Hoi»e. The Eastan District 
tmsketball tournament did not even All the smaQ 
confines of the Norfolk Arow. 

It has not bees a banner year for BencH 
basketball players, signing collie sdiolarships. 
Many a Beach coach ctmiplains about the lack of 
exposure his players get, at the same tin» the 
governing body (rf the ^wt \m a pdicy penalizing 
athtetes for participatir^ in games \i^ia« oritege 
scouts abound. 

Fo<^ball does tai escq>e the hand of the VHSL. 
Unlikemany states, Vii^nia dora not b(M spriiw 
football practices much to the dismay of many 
coaches. Twenty s|Mring anerooons of U^t pn^tice 
6aes not seem all that evil. 

With the new 30 scholarship limit inv«ed by ttie 
NCAA, it has become toughar to get a free tictet to 
college. The few days of extra work m^ spdl the 
(hf f eraice in a marginal b>llpiiqr» receivtog m 
education free that he could n^ <^«^^rt. 
It is time the VHSL started woi«ng fwthi 
studHite imtewi of trying to impoe its own brtacl 
of law ud ordtr. 



OTV 



PUft A-e^Tha Sun-Wednesday, May 15, 1974 



MsuHysm ^nnis king 



A year did little to change the com- 
plexion of the Eastern District tennis 
scene. 

Maury, for the second consecutive year, 
conquored all comers. The Commodores 
swept to the title taking top honors in all 
six singles categories and the three 
doubles titles. 

' For the second straight year the rest of 
th«> district was forced to battle for runner- 
up honors. First Colonial came away with 
the lions share of the scraps Maury left 
over in their title blitz. The young Patriots 
starved notice that they will be a force to be 
recokned with in coming years. First 
Colonial took three runners-up spots in 
the singles competition and were on the 
losing end of all three of Maury's doubles 
triumphs. 



l,AN(;tKY HOLLAND gained the 
runner-up spot in the number two players 
competition. Holland missed out on his 
title shot fallino tn Maiirv's Sam Asdit in 
straightsets6-2, 7-6. Holland had moved into 
the final round with a 6-0, 6-0 win in the 
(|uarterfinal round and a liard fought 5-7,6- 
2. 6-2 semifinal round triumph over 



Kempsville's David Brandt. It 
Brandt's second loss of the season. 



was 



Patriot Tom Wade came the closest of 
any district player to dethroning a Com- 
modore in singles competition. Wade 
extended Maury's number-four player 
Frank Pace to three sets before suc- 
cumbing 6-1,3-6, 6-2. Wade had advanced to 
the finals with two consecutive straight set 
victories. 

Bill Price was the other Patriot to make 
it to the final round before falling to a 
Maury nelman. Price dropped a straight 
set decision to Elliot Webb 6-2, 7-6. 

The team of Howard Jones and Wade 
was the lone First Cok>nial doubles squad 
not to fall in straight sets in the final round. 
The Patriot pair dropped the match 6-2, 3- 
6, 6-2. 

Kempsville put on Uie second best 
iwrformance of a city team in the district 
tournament with two players reaching the 
final roiind. Kempsville's number one 
player Nick O'Hara missed his shot at a 
district title, dron>ing his second decision 
of the season to the Commodores Vince 
Thomas 6-0, 6-0. One the way to his defeat 



in the final round, O'Hara avenged an 
earlier defeat to First Cokwiial's Jeff 
Danworth with a straight wA. 6-2, M vic- 
tory, llie winning Thomas completed his 
second successive undefeated season ill' 
district competion. Thomas was seeded 
first in the tournament. 

BILLY MILLER was the otiiw Chief to 
reach the final round. He met with the 
same fate as his teammate, losing in 
straight sets. Maury's Rom Kramer 
captured an imiweasive 6-1, 6^) title win. It 
was Miller's second defeat of the season. 
He had advanced into the final round with 
easy straight set triumphs in both the 
quarterfinals and semifinals. 

Princess Anne's Rich Banta completed 
the Beach sweep of second place honors. 
Maury's Harry Hitch was a 6-0, 6-1 title 
victor over Banta. Promising sophomore 
Banta was the lone Cavalier to advance 
beyond the semiflnals. 

For the second straight year. Beach 
efforts were not enough to halt the ram- 
paging Commodore machine. The chase to 
stop Maury continues this week at the 
Eastern Regional tournament which 
started Tuesday at the Hampton Institute 
and will continue through today. 



Gross to play with Va. all-stars 



It has been a banner year for 
athletics at Bayside High 
School. Four athletes have been 
awarded college scholarships. 
The Marlin baseball team is in 
the thick of the Eastern District 
pennant race. 

Earlier in the year Bayside's 
Roscoe Coles and Don Harold 
were awarded for their gridiron 
efforts by being named to the 
East squad in the Virginia all- 
star gamt> this summer in 
Roanoke. 

AN ALL-STAH basketball 
game will beheld in conjunction 
with the football game. Once 
again the directors of the 
week's festivities returned to 
the Bayside talent pool for a 
l^yer. Bayside's star pivotman 
Elton Gross was selected to be a 
participant in the third annual 
affair. 

The selection continues the 
parade of honors that have been 




squad for the second con- 
secutive year. He was also 
named to the all-district team. 
More importantly, Guilford 
College thought enough of 
Gross' basketball playing 
ability to award him a full 
athletic grant-in-aid to their 
institution. 



Gross was the main cog on the 
Marlin basketball team this 
year. His efforts played a major 
role in Bayside posting their 
best record in the school's 
history at 10-10. The star 
pivotman set a single game 
rebounding record against 
Kellam when he corralled 28 
errant shots. 



Neptune festival plans 
fishing tournament 



GROSS 

heaped upon the 6'5" Gross 
since the basketball season's 
conclusion. Gross was selected 
to The Sun All-City basketball 



2i 



The Virginia Beach Neptune 
festival has announced plans for 
a fishing tournament. A 
$1,000.00 cash grand prize will 
be awarded for the most out- 
standing fish caught in each of 
22 categories. Second and third 
prizes will also be awarded. The 
tournament will start at 6:00 
a.m. Sept. 28 and run con- 
tinuously to 8:00 p.m. on Oct. 4. 



Any individual may enter the 
Neptune Festival Fishing 
Tournament by purchasing a 
$5.00 ticket. Tickets must be 
purchased prior to catching any 
fish that may be entered in the 
tournament. 

Tickets are available at 
participating weighing stations. 
For any further information 
call 490-1221. 



CONSOLIDATED REPORT OF CONDITION OP 

PEOPLE'S BANK OF VIRGINIA BEACH 



of Vbglnia Beach in the State of Viigiiiia and 
Domestic SubiidiariM at the Close of butinesi on 
April 24, 1974. Made to The State CotiK)ntfc>n 
Commiitton. 

ASSETS 



Cash and due from banks • •"— 

U. S. Treasury securities • > •;••• 

OM««»(M9»4ML«th« 13.8. Gkwmunait ^gmdm and corpotatlom 

Obligationa or States and political subdiviiions 

Oth« MCurttiM 

IVading account securities ..; 

Fcd«al funds sold and securities purchased under agreemenU to resell 

Other iMins 

Bank premises, furniture and fbctures, and other asseU representing bank 

premises .1 , 

RmI estate owned other than bank immises ' 

Investments In subsidiaries not consolidated - ■ 

Custommr's liability to this bank on^ acceptances ouUUnding 

Other assets • 



$ 3,433,288.93 
. »0i,507.67 

none 
5,913,347.26 
none 
none 
none 

33,212,919.31 

1.825,739.19 

none 

none 

708.325,75 

134,657.98 

TOTAL ASSETS ••••••• * 46.136,813.09 

LIABILITIES 

Demand deposiU of individuais, partnerships, and corporations $15,254,156.^ 

lime and savings deposits of individuals, partnerships, and corporations 17,473,473.30 

DeposiU of United States Government 268,709.02 

Depouts of SUtes and political subdivisions 4,256,819.91 

Deposits of foreign governments and official institutions ».. none 

Deposits of commercial banks none 

Certified and officers' checks, etc 710,639.81 

TOTAL DEPOSITS $37,963,798,40 

(a) ToUl demand deposiU 17,098,825.10 

(b) Total time and savings deposiU 20,864,973.30 

Federal funds purchased and securities sold under agreemenU to re|nircnase ... 2,000,000.00 

Other liabilities for borrowed money "*■*• 

Mortgage indebtedness .tao"Sm tk 

Acceptances executed by or for account of this bank and outstanding i So 'i ao i a 

Other liabilities - 2,l<iZ,10».13 

TOTAL LIABILITIES ^JM^Hi^^M 

MINORITY INTEREST IN CONSOLIDATED SUBSIDIARIES 



none 



0^ 



RESERVES ON LOANS AND SECURITIES 

Reserve for bad debt losses on loans (set up pursuant to Intornal 

Revemie Service rulings) 

Other reserves on loans 

Reserves on securities 

TOTAL RESERVES ON LOANS AND SECURITIES 



% 262,935.94 
none 
none 

$ 262,935.94 






CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 



none 



Capital notes and debentures 

(^Mcify interest rate and maturity of each iuue outstanding) 
Equity capital, total - $3,069,616.8'^ 



none 



*a^»* 



1,290.000.00 

1,535.090.00 
244,526.87 
none 



Preferred stock-total par value ^^ ~ 

(No. shares outstanding • none) 
Common stock-total par value 

(No. shares authorized 258,000) (No. shares out^nding 258,000) 

Surjrius 

UndWWed profiU 

Reaove for contingencies and other capital resnves 

TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNTS $ 3,069,616.87 

TOTAL UABILITIES' RESERVES' AND CAPITAL ACCOUNTS $46,186,818.09 

MEMORANDA 

Average of total deposiU for the IS calendar days ending with call date $39,412,533.00 

Average of total loans for the 15 calendar days ending with call date 32,726,166.00 

Unearned discount on installment loans included in total capital accounU none 

U K. JauMi Grouch, It., fteaideBt, of dw dwve- 
naned back, do lolen^ swMt Itel dds lepoft of 
omdMoii is tiM and oxnct to te best of aiy 



Comct-Attaat: 



STAItS OF VIRGINIA, CITY OF 

ViRGMIA BEACH, SK 

^oi» to Hid ndiacribcd before me this 10th day of 

M^, 1974. and I henby cot^ tbi^ I on not u 

offlwr or dneetor of this Iwifc. 



K.lna«sCia«ich,Ji. 
JJ'.Mdboa 
W«F> WkMcfamt 

E.T.atM,ni 



^EAL) 



cxpifM 



Svwi Ray Fuaaell 
NotnynibUc 



16, 1976 




A POLE VAULTER sflhouetted a^liist the 
night sky makes an interesting picture. 
Regretfully for the vaulter invorved, the l>end 

Marlins beached 



in tlM crossbar leads one to believe the 
attempt was unsuccessful. (Sun photo by Neal 
Sims) 



Pilots steer by field 



Alabama football coach Bear Bryant 
once said, "winning isn't everything but it 
sure beats the hell out of anything that 
comes in second." 

With no slight to the illustrious Bryant, 
Bayside proved him wrong at the Eastern 
District track meet at Lake Taylor. With 
Roscoe Cedes finishing first in four evente, 
the Marlins still could not overcome 
consistent Norview. The Pilots won only 
two events, but consistently placed in 
numerous events to upset the favored 
Marlins Wk to 41«/i. 

The Marlins were hurt by the absence of 
freshmen star Jerry Mosely, who was 
injured during the 100-yard dash finals at 
the city meet two weeks ago. Before the 
meet, Bayside Coach Len Greenwood 
figured Mosely's abscence would cost his 
charges 10 points. The loss proved vital. 

s 

BAVSIDK. ON the strength of Coles' 
brilliant performance had forged a slim 
lead, entering the last event of the district 
meet— the mile relay. Norview posted one 
of their rare wins in the competition 
covering the distance in 3:24.2 to win the 
team title. 

Norview's excellent performance 
prevented a clean sweep bjr Beach clubs. 
Following Bayside were Ktsmpsville (34), 
Kellam (30), Princess Anne (27) and First 
Colonial (18). Cox completed the local 
showing with an eighth place finish. The 
Falcons registered a team total of 10 
points. 

Despite Bayside's disappointing loss, 
Coles was again the class of the meet. The 
starring Marlin senior even improved on 
his city meet performance where he swept 
the 100. the 220, and the 440 with a se<^>pd 
place in the long jump. "This time aroiiihd 
Coles added a long jump triumph to his 
personal win column and took fifth place in 
the tri|rie jump. Coles accounted for 25 of 
Bayside's points. 



He won the long jump with a leap of 
22'4". Coles' 100-yard dash performance 
was not one of his better showings of the 
outdoor season, but his time of 10.0 was 
good enough to edge the Princess Anne duo 
of Mike Casey and Robbie Edwards. 
Running in only his thiird 220 of the season, 
Coles bettered the field with a time of 22.6. 



COLES AGAIN saved his best per- 
formance for last. In the city nieet Coles 
br<*e the city meet 440 record by six- 
tenths of a second. He was not up to his 
record-breaking performance this time 
around, but his time of 49.2 tied the 
existing district meet 440 record and gave 
the Marlins a momentary lead. 

Kempsville remained the surprise team 
of the past few weeks. The Oiiefs finished 
the dual meet portion of the outdoor season 
with a mediocre 1-3 mark. At the city 
meet, Kempsville was a narrowly beaten 
second. Their strong third place finish at 
the district meet was keyed by the familar 
trio of Mike Crabtree, Steve Sawyer and 
Matt Slavish. 

Crabtree rebounded from his city meet 
loss with a record-breaking performance 
Friday. The junior cleared 6'4" to break 
the district meet record. It bettered his 
best leap of the season by two inches. The 
city meet loss was Crabtree's only setback 
of the season. 

Sawyer set his second meet record in as 
many weeks with his mile victory. The 
long-striding Kempsville harrier beat a 
strong field with a time et 4:21.4. Slavish 
gave the Chiefs a one-two finish in the 
, /.event, finishing a few strides off teammate 
Sawyer's winning pace. Bayside's Eric 
Chapman, who tmished second to 
Sawyer's 4:17 mile in the city meet, 
slipped to third in the trio's continuing 
battle. 



Sawyer could not repeat his double of the 
city meet, falling to a revived Brian 
Rhinehart in the 880. Cox's Rhinehart 
equalled his best half-mile time of the 
outdoor season with a time of 1:57. 
Rhinehart is the only local harrier to run 
an 880 under two minutes this season. 

Slavish was not up to equalling his. 
brilliant time of 9:29 which won the city" 
two-mile test. He did post his second best 
time of Uie season outdistancing the field 
in a time of 9:42.9. Slavish is the only area , 
two-miler under ten minutes this season. It 
was his fourtli consecutive sub ten-minute 
race. 

Kellam 's fourth place finish was keyed, 
by the consistent Ken Rutledge. The 
Knight senior won the discuss with a throw 
of 146'0". Rutledge has lost in the discus 
only once this season that coming in the 
city meet. 

HE COULD NOT beat the First Colonial 
pair of Ernie Davis and Jierry Ohnaizer in 
the shot put competition. For the second 
straight week, the Patriot duo bested the 
previously undefeated Rutledge. Davis, 
came out the winner in his personal duel 
with teammate Ohnaizer, reversing the 
city meet decision. Davis won the event 
with a heave of 53' *k". 

Princess Anne's surprisingly strong 
finish was keyed by brilliant hurdler Karl 
Fremd. The Cavalier harrier outclassed 
the hurdle field taking both the in- 
termediate and high hurdle teste. Fremd . 
set a meet record in the intermetiate 
hurdles, becoming the first area hurdler 
under 40 seconds in the event this season 
with a time of 39.0. 

Teammate Robbie Edwards tpent a 
frustrating afternoon watching Bayside's 
Coles' back. After his third place finish in ' 
the 100-yard dash, the Cavalier senior^ 
finished in the runner-up slot in both the ' 
220 and 440. 



BOAT 

OWNER 

READ 

THIS! 




Vm HAVE A NEW POLICY DE- 
SIGNE]) FOR THE OWNERS 
OP 0UTBOAR06, INBOARDS, 
SAILBOATS AND INBOARD/ 
OUmOARDS, 25 PEET OR 
UNDER^COVERAGEINCLUIXS: 

YOUR BOAT, MOTOR, EQUIP- - 
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YOUR UABIUTY TO OIHERS 
ARISING PRmi THE USE OP 
BOAT. 

MEMCAL PAYMENTS 

12M.0NTHS WERAHON 

UNRBSTRICIBD TERRITORIAL 
LOOTS. 

rRDOUMS INCLUDE COVER- 
AGE FOR PHYfflC AL DAM- 
ACX $100,00a WATCM3UFT 
UAULrrY AND 11/100 MQX- 
CAL PAYMENTS. 



CHECK 
WITH US 
FOR COST 

COMPARISON 



Casey 
accepts 

grant 



Princess Anne's Mike Casey 
became the tenth Beach high 
school football player to receive 
an athletic grant-in aid. 
Catawba awarded Casey the 
athletic grant last week. 

The senior running back had 
an off year last season for the 1- 
8-1 Cavaliers. Casey was 
hampered by nagging injuries 
throughout much of Ute season. 
His physical tools were enough 
to impress Catawba. The 195- 
pound Casey runs the 40 in 4.6. 
He placed second to Bayside's 
Roscoe Coles in the 100-yard 
dash at last week's Eastern 
District track meet. 

Casey is the second member 
of the Princess Anne squad to be 
awarded an athletic grant this 
year. Teammate Frank HoUey 
signed with Duke University 
earlier in the year. 

Catawba plans to use Casey 
as a defensive back. 



xis«jaBSft«is^^ 



Athlete of 
the Week 



§ 



m 



n 



Alan 
Price 



Kempsville 



i 



i 



a 





SOFTBALL TOUIWEY 

A "Class B" double 
elimination Softball tournament 
will be Memorial Day we^end. 
beginning May 24. For furthw 
details contact commissioner 
Jim Brown at 340<845. 



Kempsville's Alan Price has beea selected 
as Virginia Beach high schod athlete d the 
week by The Sun. 

Shortstop Price led the (kfen&ng state 
diampons to an important 8-2 win over 
Granby Monday. The seniOT, wlu) has signed 
an athletic grant-in-aid with ODU, went four 
five witti three singles and a double to key the 
Qhiefs 16-hit jitktck. Price's best day at the 
plate on tte's^^^n raised his average to .405. 

An (Mitstanding atiilete is named weekly by 
The Sun ^u*bu^out the high schod sprii^ 
seascm. 




June thru 
August 




(Two 3-w«6k 
t^wions) 



AT NORFOLK ACADEMY 

EASrinN TENMS CENTER 'S compete, mtmiw Jr. DevelopmeHt Pn^rm emphtrizing dl 
<tfteHri*StmkM exeeu^m, FM^vork. SmHgy. «»«*««)' ...6 MfUj' ifiOfltd in- 



ffiPARATE aOtm P(Mt BEONNOtS, ADV. ^G., DOERMEHATE, k ADVANCED 

BOYS/ORLS . . . rotaikmalctahon neiRucnm. 

ENROLLMENT LIMITED 4 or 5 pw groupl 

Fot ta>chwe A bfoflB^OB. cd: 
-rwMVM»» ROGER FLAX, PHJ).EMraNTn«IS CENTER 
"unr ao Twr ^^ gMOTAM M. (Suite 1008) Norfolk. V». 

•27-MtO 



■ife^MaaMtttfH 



■■M 



mi^^u 



^iMBlMift 



Chiefs triumph Iwhind IS-hitattadc 



Tht Sun-Wdntjday. May 15, 1974-P||^ A-7 



Monday 

Kn^vilie 8 Gragby 2 

Kempeville exploded for their 
Wghest hit t<^l of tte season to 
stay r^ht on league-lrader 
Bayside's heels with an 
important M win over Granby. 
The Chiefs bailed out 16 Mts In 
32 at bats for their sixth 
consecutive district win. 
Pouthpaw Bob Harrison was the 
benificiary oi the base hits, 
Coasting to his sixth win in 
feven decisions. 
: Kempsyiile broke on top early 
vith four runs in the first two 
Minings. Successive singles by 
^lan Price. Steve Hanson and 
Marls O'Hara gave the Chi^s a 
1-0 lead after one inning. 
Hanson put the game snvay in 
iie Second with a (hree. run 
home run. Price was the day's 
tutting star with a four for five 
performance at the {4ate. 

Harrison lost his shutout bid 
in the sixth, but maiiaged to 
complete his sixth game of the 
season with seven strikeouts. 

First Colonial at 
Princess Anne ppd 

The game was postponed 
because of wet grounds. It has 
been rescheduled for this 
afternoon at Princess Anne.' 

NorvlewSKellamZ 

A season, which started full of 
promise for Joe Kwasny and 
Kellam, ended in fnistratimi. 



Norview bunched tbdr hits in 
the opening iniung, touching 
Kwastiy for thr^ run. 

TheKn^hts, who held a share 
of the district lead for much of 
the season, failed to close the 
gap despite a second inidng 
home nn bf Mike Fox: 

Kwasny finishes his sason, 
teacH^g the district in wins and 
strikeouts. The Kellam see 
fintehed with a 7-3 record Hie 
loss ckses out Kellam^s season 
with a S-4 district record. The 
KiUghts had gotten (^ to a 44 
1^010 start, but faded in the 
stretch. 




Friday 



Bayside5Norvlew4 

Craig Wiesner not only saved 
the game, but maybe the season 
for the Marlins. The star south- 
paw entered the game in the 
bottom of the final frame with a 
runner on second in relief of 
starter Marty Moore. Wiesno- 
pitched his way out of the jam, 
netting a double play on a fly 
ball to center to end the contest. 

The Marlins broke on t<^ 
early, bunching the majority of 
their tuts in the early inninp. 
The offensive barrage spotted 
Moore a five-run cushion which 
stood-up until the fifth frame. A 
thrto-run burst brought the 
Pilots back within one run, but 
Wiesner's relief pitching closed 
the door. 

The win enabled the 7-2 
Marlins to pull to a half game 



lead ova- pursuing Kempsville 
in the tight pennant race. The 
win was Moore's fifth straight, 
improving his record to S-2. 

Kellam 3 First Coloniali 

Kellam 's Joe Kwasny became 
the first pitcher in the district to 
win seven games with a 3-1 
complete game win over 
First Colonial. The win im- 
proved the Knights district 
record to 6-3, keeping them in a 
third place tie with Maury. For 
the stumbling Patriots it was 
their sixth loss in seven tries. 

Kwasny struckout nine in his 
route going performance, 
raising his league leading 
strikeout total to 97. The 
Patriots did reach Kwasny for a 
run in the bottom of the second, 
breaking his string of 13 
scoreless innings. 

The Knights pounded out 10 
hits in route to their second 
consecutive district win.' Hard- 
luck pitcher Scott Lowery tock 



the loss, 
one win. 



his fifth againti only 



May? 



Princess Anne 7 
Cox 4 

llie reju^mated Cavaliers 
continued ttieir hot streak down 
the stretch with their third 
strai^t league victory. Prin- 
cess Anne nailed down the win 
with three runs in the top of the 
eighth inning. Cox had forced 
the issue into extra innings with 
single tallies in the fourth and 
fifth innings. 

Kevin Sheehan, improving his 
record to 3-4, picked up the win 
for the Cavaliers. Sheehan 
came on in relief of starter 
Dave Weldon in the fourth and 
hurled one-run relief the rest of 
the way. Jack Ferrell took the 
loss for the Falcons. 



KdlamSBaysMet 

Bayside's lead in the Eastern 
District pennant race 
evaporated thaiyts to KMIani's 
Joe Kwasny. The fireballing 
righthander went the distance 
striking out 10 m a three4)it 
shutolit pa-formancef 

The Knights put the game 
away with a two-run spurt in the 
fourth inning. Wes Wagner 
accounted for the Kellam of- 
fensive expkoion with a twq- 
run home-run. The round- 
tripper, coming off Marlin 
starter Craig Wiesner, was his 
first of the year. 

Wiesner took the loss for 
Bayside, his third against five 
wins. 



First Colonials 
Booker T.WashbigUHi 3 

First Colonial finally found 
some offense for pitcher Scott 
Lowery. The result— Lowery 
notched his first win of the 
season and the Patrtots broke 
out of a dismal five-game losing 
streak with a 6-3 triumph over 
Booker T. Washington. 
Lowery's record is now 1-4. 

The Patriots put the game out 
of reach with two runs in the 
final inning. First Cok>niaI had 
jumped to an early 3-0 lead 
before the Bookers drew within 
one with a two-run fifth inning. 

The Patriot totals of six runs 
and ten hits were both seasonal 
highs for the club. 



Kempsville 4 
I jike Taylor! 

Kempsville continues to win 
the games they have to. The 
defending state champs pulled 
even with league-leading 
Bayside with the 4-1 win over 
Lake Taytor. The loss dn^ped 
the Titans out of the pennant 
picture. 

Righthander Jimmy Moore 
was again the pitcher, who 
delivered the crucial win. After 
his recurring first inning 
problems where the Titans 
reached him for a run, Moore 
was just about untoucliable 
shutting out Lake Taytor the 
rest of the way. Moore 
struckout 10 while holding the 
Titans to a mere three hits. 

Kevin &nith, a light-hitting 
first baseman, stepped into the 
offensive spotlight for the 
Chiefs. SmiU) delivered the big 
blow in Kempsville's four-run 
fourth, singling home a pair of 
rims. 

Moore improved his record to 
6-1. 



•AiTIRN DliTmCT 

HIGH SCMOOL 

■AiSBALL 

tTANOIMai 

W L . 




■AYSIDK 
>KIMPSVII.LI 

Maury 

KtLLAM 

Norvlcw 

B.T. Withington 

FIRST COLONIAL 

xPRINCKStANNB 

COX 

Grinby 



KT OB 
. MM - 

. 777 
. TOO 

. too 

. «0 
. 400 



'•? 
1 
2 
4 
t 
333 <>/> 



;^ GOMER 

PVLE 



100 7 



«— latt gam* not includtd 



Bayside front court duo 
named Att-Americas 



Elton Gross and Jim Goffigan 
carried Bayside to their best 
basketball record in the school's 
history last season. For their 
efforts, Coach and Athlete 
magazine named the pair of 
Marlin front court men to their 
Prep All-America squad. 

The selection of the squad was 
based on nominations from high 
school coaches, sports writers 
and college recruiters. Gross 
and Goffigan are now eligible to 
be named to the magazine's 
Prep 100, Super 10, and. Cum 
Laude teams. Those selections 
will be announced in the May- 
June edition of Coach and 
Athlete. 

GROSS AND GOFFIGAN 

Wtf e both members of The Sun 
All-City basketball team this 
past season. It was their second 



consecutive year an the honor 
squad. Gross, a 6'5" pivotman, 
had perhaps the most out- 
standing year of any Beach 
basketball player. The center 
led the city in scoring, finishing 
third in the state with a 24.7 per 
game average. Gross set single 
season scoring and rebounding 
records for the Marlins. He will 
attend Guilford College next 
year on a basketball grant-in- 
aid. 

Goffigan closed out a brilliant 
three-year career this past 
season, which saw him capture 
nearly all of the Marlins careo* 
records. Goffigan set a single 
game Bayside scoring mark 
with a 39-point effort against 
l^ake Taylor this past season. 
Goffigan fell just a few points 
shy of becoming the first player 
in Bayside history to score over 
a 1,000 points in a career. 




B & L AUTO PARTS & REPAIR 

340-0707 480-1418 

146 S. Rosemont Rd. Roar Princess Anno 

Noxt to Sun BMg. Plaza Shopping Contor 

TWO LOCATIONS TO SERVE 
YOUR AUTOIMOTIVE NEEDS 



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WEEKDAYS 




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spark plugs to gas and headers and manifolds and cams - At prices 
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6 PM 



WEEKDAYS 



GOFFIGAN 



Sports Record' 






This Waak 



WBONESDAV 



BnaMI — First Colonlil at Princes* 

Anne 

TenBti — Eastern Regional Tournament 

at Hampton institute 

FRIDAY 



Track — Eastern Regional Track Meet at 
Todd Field 

SATURDAY 



Track — Eastetfl Regional Track Meet at 
Todd Field 

MONDAY 



Sa^bdl — Eastern Regional Tournament 
at Todd Field 

Gotl — Stale Tournament at Keswick goll 
course in Charlottesville 

TUESDAY 



•ateball — Eastern Regional Tournament 
at Yodd Field 

OoN — Stale Tournament at Keswick golf 
course in Qwrlottetville 



Last Waak 



ADULT SOFTBALL RESULTS W74 

UNLIMITED, DIV No. 1 

Astors 16, Jaguars 6 

H AMContraclingM. North Landing Elec. 

13 

Nail Benders l«, FOP. No. • 17 

lndcpcnd«Mt «, Orioles 1 

Ted's Pliia Lounge », Pork Chop Farms ( 



UNLIMITED, DIV No. } 

Computer Sciences Corp. IS, Aragona "A" 

1 ' 

Crabbers S. Bucks 7 

Burger King 10, Chicho'S t 

E. Caligari & Son 10, U.S. Coast Guard 7 

My Brother's Mothers 7, CG. Pungo Radio 

s 

UNLIMITED, DIV No. 3 

CliP Teleiihone IS, Tiki 9 

Howcrin Residential Sales 12, Lynnhaven 

Lounge 9 

Cool Blues II, Paradise Inn I 

I.S.S.I., Cam Neck 18, Larasan 3 

Mulke/s 17, Va. Bch. Truckers 7 

UNLIMITED, DIV No. 4 

My Brothers IS, Smith & Keene 3 

Sir Buddy's 17, Bunn's Bailers l« 

Green Run 9, True Value t 

Taico Plumbers 13, Coastline Corp. 1} 

Chops 15, Jaycecs 10 

UNLiMlfiD~Div No. 5 

Rookies 14, Corvette Club 5 

Hot VMieels 30, B It n consn-uction it 

Class "A" 

Oil Realty }, Murden's Appliances i 
Reld Associates 7, Evergreen Realty I 
AAalbon Farms "Porkers" 9, Expo's 
Merchants 11, Professional Really 7 
Stewart Sandwiches 7, Cavaliers 3 
Tony's 11, Greenwich Supply 10 



ADULT TENNIS LEAGUES 1974 

WOMEN'S BEGINNERS 

Team (3) 3, Team (4) 4 

Team (I) 4, Team (7) I 

Team ((I 4, Team (6) 3 

Team (3) «, Team (5) 1 

WOMEN'S ADVANCED BEGINNERS 
Team (4) 3, Team (3) 3 
Team (1) 3, Team 17) 3 
Team (I) 5, Team («l 
Team (3) 3, Team (51 3 



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Gardenin g 



Page A-S^-Tlw Sun-Wednesday, May 15, 1074 



Mildew is 
controlled 
by sprays 



Q. The leaves of my crape myrtle are 
covered with a white powder and some of 
the leaves are falling. What can I do? 

A. The problem is powdery mildew and 
it is very common on crape myrtle at this 
time of year. Spray your trees with 
Actidion P.M. or Benlate at 14-day 
into^als until the disease appears to be 
eradicated. Any infected leaves that drop 
off should be cleaned up and disposed of. 




questions & answers about lawns & gardens 



Q. I've noticed garden mums for sale 
now. Is it a good idea to plant them now 
for fall bloom? 

A. Definitely purchase and plant your 
gardoi mums at this time of the year. 
The Classic mum is a good yellow variety 
and it is also the official Neptune Festival 
flower. Many of the local garden centers 
have stocked up on the Classic mum since 
it is a good variety and it does flower in 
late September when the Neptune 
Festival is taking place. 



Q. The lower leaves on my tomato 
plants are turning yellow. Is this normal? 

A. It is not normal, but is an expected 
response to the cool temperatures we 
have boea experiencing. Until the night 
temperatures warm and the soil warms 
then your tomato plants wiU not grow 
properly. 



HotliHe wUl be gbd to answer your questiont about lawns and 
gurdeiu. Send your questions to ihaHtne, Virginia Beach Sun, 
138 Rotemont Road, Virginia Beach, Va. 23452. 



Council offers 
Neptune flower 



"The Classic," the official flower of the Vii^nia Beach 
Neptune Festival, is being offered for sale by the Council 
of Garden Chibs of Vii^inia Beach. "The Classic" is a 
yellow chrysanthemum. 

The Ne^une Festival committee plans to award prizes 
to individuals and businesses displaying the mum during 
the fall festival. 

A silver Revere bowl will be awarded for the best 
display of the mum at a commercial place of business and 
a {rivate residence. In addition, $15 will be given to the 
Virginia Beach garden club sellii^ the most [dants and $15 
to the club making the most effective use of the flower as a 
display for neighborhood entranceways. 

"The Classic" is on sale for 50 cents per plant. 
Information may be obtained from Vicky Rodgers, 
president of the KempsviUe Garden Club, at ^-0965. 



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Have you visited a home 
that was beautifully 
decwated indoors and then 
walked onto a terrace which 
was a hodgepodge? 

The sliding window and 
scenic terrace have 
revdutionized the approai^ 
to outdoor space. We m 
longer tend to think in the 
terms of front and back 
yards, but rather of 
supplementary living areas. 

SPACE adjacent to living, 
dining and sleeping areas 
has come to be considered 
as an outdoor room. Space 
flows across thresholds and 
color must flow with it. 

It is important to consider 
color relationship of terrace 
furnishings when they are 
constantly visible from the 
living room through a wall 
of glass. 




EXTENSION DIVISION 



THE BOUNTY of color in 
home furnishings makes it 
easy to find outdoor 
furniture and fabrics. 
Where silks, velvets and 
tweeds leave off indoors, 
plastic, canvas and metal 
pick up outside. In these 
materials, you can interpret 
a coordinated scheme by 
simply restating your 
interior color scheme. 



Garden club 
news and rtotes 



MAY KASKKTS were 
warded ribbons in the recent 
contest sponsored by the Lake 
Smith Terrace Garden Club for 
club members. Top winners 
were Jean Maxwell, Dot Wilgus 
and Doris Falter. Blue ribbon 
winners were Kay Calvert, 
BeUy Given, Jean Maxwell, Dot 
Wilgus, Flo Blankenship, Ruth 
King, Doris Faller, Lena Fox, 
Aurora Sanchez, Lee Zim- 
merman and Ni Rhodes. 

JUDGK Mrs. Malcolm Todd 
was guest speaker at the recent 
meeting of the Princess Anne 
Plaza Garden Club. Mrs. Todd 
judged arrangements brought 
in by members'and gave tips on 
floral arranging and care of 
plants. Officers elected during 
the meeting are: president, 
Mrs. Bill Forinash; first vice- 
president, Mrs. Eddie Snead; 
second vice-president, Mrs. 



William Colona; recording 
secretary, Mrs. Richard 
Cannon: corresponding 
secretary, Mrs. Melvin Seay, 
and treasurer, Mrs. Charles 
Price. 

OFFICERS were elected at 
the recent meeting of the 
Riverton Garden Club. They 
are: president, Karyl Kraft; 
first vice-president, Elsie Katz; 
second vice-president, Pat 
Singstock; recording secretary, 
Mary Ann McGrath; 
corresponding secretai'y, Susan 
Danziger, and treasurer, 
Margaret Stewart. 

THK HOARD meeting of the 
Council of Garden Clubs of 
Virginia Beach will be Tuesday 
at 10 a.m. at the Pancake House 
in Princess Anne Plaza. The 
meeting will include a Dutch 
treat continental breakfast. 



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Floodlights and spots 
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shrubs and concealed in low 



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the cozy warmth tA a firelit 
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Changes made now can 
provide satisfactory living 
space the whole year. 





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FOOD 




LINDA SEARLS whirls in rehearsal of a pollia 
number called "Bumming Around." The 
polka was only one of a variety of numbers 



presented in the Civic Ballet's Kaleidoscope of 
Dance." (Sun photo by Rod Mann) 



Provnising 



-:w^ 



'Kaleidoscope' shows sample of talent 



Many persons— even those who frequently 
patronize other arts groups in the city— are turned 
off at the mention of the word ballet. But, the 
performance of the Virginia Beach Civic Ballet last 
week-end might have changed their minds. 

Under the du-ection of Russian-trained Miec- 
zyslaw Morawski, the Civic Ballet is being h-ans- 
formed into a group which Beach residents and 
others will be hearing mwe about in the future. 
(This was the first performance of the ballet 
company under Mr. Morawski's direction since his 
arrival in the Beach in September.,) 

Though the dancers are not always as poised and 
precise as one would like, the company has talent 
and promise. Even now the company puts on an 
entertaining presentation. "Kaleidoscope of 
Dance" was, as the title suggested, a sample of 
what the group can do. 

THE MOST EXCITING performance of the 
company's presentation was a pas de deax from 
"Sleeping Beauty" danced by Linda Searls and 
James Ambrose. Ms. Searls is one of the Civic 
Ballet's most accomplished dancers and she has 
something— perhaps her smile— that always seems 
to capture the audience. She was ably partnered by 
Mr. Ambrose. 

The bi^est problem for the company seems to be 
the lack of male dancers. Dancer John Medlin 
appeared in five of the nine presentations. One 
could only guess that they must have been feeding 
him vitamins backstage to keep him gowg during 
the strenuous dancing niunbers. 

The third numbes^on the program premiered the 
"Chopin Suite," and Mr. Medlin appeared first in a 
pas de deax with Shirley Oake^, tten a pas de trois 
with Debby Benvin and Petra Wirth and finally 
danced the "Waltz in E-Minor with Ms. Benvin, 
Ms. Searls JipOakes, Ms. Wirth and Mr. Ambrose. 
The seccma oance number even had to be delayed 
until Mr. Medlin could make his quick CMtume 
change. 



■Revietv 



The Vvpnia Beach Civic Ballet presented its spring dance 
performance, "Kaleidoscope of Dance " Saturday and Sunday 
at Plaza Junior High SchooL The company is under the dir- 
ection of Mieczyskw Morawski The next performance will 
be June 28 at the Norfolk Theatre Center as a part of the 
Tidewater Arts FestivoL 



OF THE "CHOPIN SUITE." the pas de deax of 
Ms. Cakes and Mr. Medlin proved to be the most 
well done of the numbers. The dancers performed 
with grace and style, and costumes and lighting 
were excellent. 

Mr. Medlin once again appeared with the other 
four dancers in a nicely choreographed premiere (rf 
the familiar first movement of "Beethoven's Fifth 
Symphony." 

Mr. Morawski has done a terrific job with 
choreography for the company. He created or re- 
choreographed all numbers for "Kaleidoscope of 
Dance," except those done by members (rf the 
ballet company. 

There was only one performance in the recital 
that one might take exception to— the opening 
dance routine. Billed as an "Introduction to Ballet 
(Jlasswork," the dance had little to offer, unless it 
was to give parents a taste of what goes on during 
the long hours of ballet practice. Ev«i that might 
be stretching it, for the number was too well- 
rehearsed to be realistic. 

THE SECOND PORTION of the pn^am seemed 
to last only seconds. The numbers were good but in ^i&s* 
most cases decid^y too short. 

"Greeting Polonaise" featured the yoang junior 
members of the Civic Ballet. Though far from 
professionals, the group took pride in their per- 
formance. Young Joseph Timlin appeared ex- 
ceptionally proud as the only male dancer among 1 1 
females. Others in the dance included Alison Forst, 
Amanda t}oldsmith, Lisa Hunt, Elizabeth Hurd, 



Trishia Meacham, Kelly Powell, Kim Powell, 
Cherie Ryder, Ann Tate, Sabina Timlin and Dottie 
Watkins. 

John Medlin was once again on stage with Ms. 
Oakes and Ann Watkins in the popular "Trepak" 
from the "Nutcracker Suite." The Civic Ballet has 
performed "Trepak" before various groups in the 
city, but the presentation during the "Kaleidoscope 
of Dance" was the best performance. 

"Awakening," a modern dance with 
choreography by Marilyn Baker, restaged by Ms. 
Searls, was performed by Ms. Wirth and Ms. 
Searls. The piece was too short to have much im- 
pact though what one saw was delightful. 

DEBBY BENVIN presented a jazz impression 
number which she choreographed. Like the modern 
dance, it was short but a nice change from classical 
ballet. 

The Civic Ballet company wound up their per- 
formance with a fun-filled polka called "Bumming 
Around". Members of the group danced around the 
stage, and it was an excellent ending to an over-all 
go<xi performance. 

Costuming was lavish for all dance numbers and 
was better than one would find in most productions 
of small, beginning ballet companies. The taped 
music was for most part satisfactory though some 
endings and pauses left the audience wondering 
how to respond. 

The effectiveness of the use of the projector to 
flash the title and names of performers on the wall 
before each number is questionable. Many times 
the pauses between the title's appearance on the 
wall and the beginning of the performance left the 
anxiflus and restless aiiatence in the dark. 

Everyone involved in the ballet production sh<Mild 
be proud of its spring performance, and everyone in 
the area should look forward to bigger and better 
things from Mr. Morawski's compai^. 

— Unda Miller 



Courageous climb to dentist^s chair 



X 



ScAne peo{4e cUmb moun talis ; I go to the (kntist. 
Why? BecatKe the cavity is there. 

I realize I slKxild appreciate the wonders al 
modem dentistry. And I have nothing against the 
man personally. But the simple bruth is: I'm 
chickea 

I woncter if Sir Edmuml Hillary, bef(« the big 
cUmb, w<Ae up in the middle of the night and 
thought: what's that awful tbiog I have to do 
tommwrow? Oh yes, Mount Everrat. MajHiie I 
coukl oidl and cancel the climb. 

IF HE DID have such momente. I'm c(nvinc«l 
he'd never admit it-not the way he waved that flag 
ami iMtike out Uie M chocdate when he gM to the 
top, anm^ tlvoi^h the fraM. 

No, Sta* HiUary, ^st like men^xtif Ac, p«f ers 
Ae bravado approach. I ra^Md ttii f act to tbe 
teOett m I nt waWog my torn In neqr dMtM't^ 




receptiwi room recent^. 

"Doctor's runung a little late," the receptionist 
aid. "It will be a few minute." 

"Look," I said, dron^ flie mapdne I was 
dhr^fafii^ "I hate to have him huiry (M#my 



accwmt. Why don't I cwne back another time?" 

THE RECEPTIONIST gave me a strai^e, secret 
smile and told me to sit down. I turned to the man 
next to me who was starii^ sttrically at his knees. 

"You look like a man with impcrtant biainess 
waiting for you on tiie outside," I b^an. "How'd 
you like to go ahead ci me?" 

"I'm waitii^ for my little boy," he said. I don't 
muMe, Iwt if I'd had a match I'd have smoked the 
butte in tte uh tray. 

WhM my m«n«it finally came and the mn^ 
ishered me in ami assisted me into the chair, I 
reali«d the wcwst was over. There was nowhere to 
go trmn there but out I gave the approaching 
(tentist a phony smile and lakl, "Hi!" 

Awl when it was over. I fdt like waving a flag, 
ai^ I woid^'t haw mind»i a cup (rf hot choc(date 
either. We know, d(Jii't we, Sir Hillary, that once the 
mountain ta climbed, tbee's r«aUy ntOung to it. 



Acting tour 



All the world's 
a stage-even 
a playground 



By DONNA HENDRICK 
Sun SUrr Writer 

Children will find more than sports and games 
this 8umm«- at the city's playgrowids. They may 
even ^ee a few comedians, Jugglers, mimes and 
dramatic actors. 

The performers will come from an "Acting 
Troupe" course to be taught this summer at the 
Virginia Beach campus of Tidewater Community 
College (TCC) by Bentley Anderson, insUiictor (if 
theatre communications at Virginia Wesleyan 
College. 

The Acting Troupe students will "hit the road" 
after sOme class instruction, taking their talents to 
the playgrounds operated by the Virginia Beach 
Department of Parks and Recreation at most of the 
city's public schools. 

The Acting Troupe endeavor is a joint venture of 
Tidewater Community College and the Parks and 
Recreation Department. 

"WE WANT TO involve and interest the children 
and expose them to live theatre," said Donna 
Davis, drama supervisor for the Parks and 
Recreation Department. Ms. Davis is in charge of 
administering the program for the city 
playgrounds. 

"This course is only for stage nuts," explained 
Dr. H. Stewart Smith, division chairman of TCC's 
humanities and social sciences department. 

"It will involve taking a troupe of raw rookies and 
making actors and producers out of them," he 
chuckled. 

Tidewater Community College got involved in the 
idea because "We are always lookii^' for ways to 
cooperate with the agencies in the community," Dr. 
Smith explained. 

MR. ANDERSON, who will teach the course at 
TCC, visualizes using all the tricks of im- 
provisational theatre to entertain the children at 
the playgrounds. 

"I'm not committed yet to what we will do 
exactly," heexplained, "because a lot of it depends 
on the individual peculiarities and talents Uie 
students being to it. 

"This will be performers' theatre for people who 
would like to have an enjoyable experience touring 
these recreational centers," Mr. Anderson said. 

The Acting Troupe course will begin June 17 at 
TCC and will continue every weekday from 1 to 4 
p.m. for 10 weeks. The firat few weeks of the course 
will be devoted to classroom work, including a brief 
history of the theatre, and the rest of the coune will 
be devoted to taking shows to the playgrounds. 

THE COURSE IS open to anyone interested in 
theatre. There are no prer^uisites, but Mr. 
Anderson will require that his students be reliable, 
he said. 

"What I want firat of all are people who are 
reliable and dependable," he explained. '«! want 
people who are willii^ to get up on a stage and do 
something. 

"I'd just as soon they don't know anything," he 
continued, "because I will teach them what ttiey 
need to know." 

"I don't care if the students know anything 
about theatre. In fact, I assume that none ol them 
knows anyttdng about it. 

Mr. Anderson explained that the troupe will be 
required to improvise, to "work quickly and create 
as they go along." 

HE HOPES TO be able to develop his students' 
ability to "take something unusual that happens, 
and incorporate it into our play.' 

If the playground tour is a success, the troupe 
also plans to perform in the city parks ttiis summer, 
entertaining the public at free performances. 

"This is something that is desperately needed, " 
Mr. Anderson said. 

The Acting Troupe students also will be 
required to attend rehearsals and make their own 
props, scenery and costums. Th^ hope to use the 
city's new Showm<^ile for their perfomunces if it 
arrives in time. 

The Showm(rf)ile is an extendable mobile stai^ 
transported,by truck. The Showmobile is (Hi order 
from the manufacturer and is (kie to arrive July 1. 

IF THE SHOWMOBILE doM not arrive in time 
fo? the summer performances, the Aeting Twwpe 
wiU perform on a portable pUtform whi(A wlB be 
moved from playground to playground 

llie Acting Troupe cowse is a co]^j(e emit 
course enabling studoite to earn five credit hou^. 
Dr. Smith said. The course cost is $31.25 (16.25 pa- 
credit hour ) . In addition, a $i an)licatton fee will be 
charged any student who has never attoaded any (rf 
the Tidewater Omnnunity College campuei. 

Early r^istration fw the axne will be c<m- 
ducted TiMjrsday and Friday at the Beach TCX: 
campus. Students mining this week's r^tration 
dates may register any ttme until the coune ^rts 
on June 17 by callii^ the college's admissimis <^ce 
at 42ft^)065 for details. 



/^ 



Lifestyles 



fH^||HJfl«»«»«»^««M««»*«»"»* •••••■••' 



!■•«•«••• 



B4 



P*9e B-2-The SunH««dn«day, May IS, 1974 




FOR THE FUTURE 

l'R)s ,and other mysteries 
will be explored by Ray 
Stanford, UFO and psychic 
researcher, tonight at 8 p.m. in 
a lecture at Cox High School. 
Admission is $2 for adults and $1 
for students. 

YOUNG .ACTORS in the 

creative dramatics classes 
sponsored by the Virginia 



Beach Department of Parks 
and Recreation will present six 
short subjects and |days tonight 
at 7:30 at Thoroughgood 
Elementary School. The 
program is open to the public 
free of charge. 

SKNIORS are celebrating 
Senior Week this week at 
Kellam High School. Today, 
seniors will take over 
administrative and teaching 
positions at the school. Seniors 



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will dr€Bs in l9S0s costumes 
Thursday and have an aU-day 
outing and |Mcnic at Redwii^ 
Park Friday. 

GKRRI WILNKR'8 one- 
person show of recent 
lithographs and serigra{diB is 
now on dis{^y at the Vii^nia 
Beach Arts Center gallery, 1916 
Arctic Ave. The works will be on 
dteplay through May 23. 

TWO FILMS, in Alistair 
Cooke's "America" series will 
be shown today at the Virginia 
Beach Campus of Tidewater 
Community College (Camp 
Pendleton, Buildii« 252). The 
film showing, at 1 :30 p.m., is co- 
sponsored by the Virginia 
Museum and the Virginia Beach 
Arts Center. Admission is free. 

A PANKL will discuss 
"ProUems of the Learning 
Disabled Adolescent" at 
tonight's meeting (rf the 
Tidewater Association for 
Children With Learning 
Disabilities, 7 : 30 p. m. a t Second 
Presbyterian Church, 7305 
Hampton Blvd.. Norfolk, 
election of officers 
will precede the discussioa 

ART will be on display at the 
13th araiual Sidewalk Art Show 
Thursday-Saturday at Souttiem 
Sh(q;>ping Center, f^orfolk. Prize 
money totalling 2,500 will 
be awarded in various 
cat^ories. 

A LKCTIIRK in the science trf 
creative intelligence and 
transcendental meditation (as' 
taught by Maharishi Mahesh 
Yogi) will be Thursday at 7:30 
p.m. at the Pembroke Court 
Apartments recreation center. 
Independence Bourlevard at 
Witchduck Road. The lecture is 
qwn to the public free of 
charge. Additional information 
may be obtained from the 
International Meditation 
Society, 825-7056. 

ARTIST Robert Bumell will 
give a lecture-demonstration on 
water cdors Thursday at 8 p.m. 
at the Vh-ginia Beach Civic 
Center (Dome), 19th Street and 
Pacif k Avenue. Virginia Beach 
Arts Center members and 
anyone interested in joining the 
center are invited. 

RKGISTRATION for all 
summer classes at Old 
Dominion University will be 
Thursday and Frklay from 8:30 
a.m. toBp.m. in the registration 
center (Old Administration 
Building). Course schedules 
may be obtained from the ODU 
Summer Programs offke, «9- 
8000. 

SAVINGS BONDS will be 
presented by Rep. G. William 
Whitehurst (R-Va.) to children 
in the U.S. Savings Bond 
program at Windsor Woods 
Elementary Schod Friday at 
9:30 a.m. in the school 
cafetraium. 

THK CAPK HKNRY Audubon 
Society will meet Friday at 8 
p.m. at the Norfolk SPCA, 916 
Ballentine BWd. ElizabeU) and 
Hii^h Bell of Newport News will 
present a slide program. 

THK STATK c(Mivention of 
the^ Virginia Society of the 
American Association of 
Medk»l Assistants Inc. will be 
hosted by the Virginia Beach 
chapter Friday'Sunday at the 
Ramada Inn Oceanfront. 
"... and the Beat Goes On" is the 
theme of the 18th annual state 
meeting. Gm. Mills Godwin has 
proclaimed this week Virginia 
Association of Medical 
Assistants Week. 

THK BAROQUK AND Italian 
Renaissance galleries at the 
Chrysler Muwum at Norfolk, 
OlnQT Itoad and Mowbray Arch, 



%% 



HAPPY 



aw 




VA. BEACH PICK UP 

MODOMNNOIfS 
MtMSiMNUfS 

tun* 7-10 

CANADA lAST 

Jwite 22-30 

ram WTCN cownr 

J(me28-3O,Av0. 9f} 

CBITMl aOMDA i 

WAIT MSOT Wmt 

My 713. Aug. 4W 

601MIWBT 

Jyly 21 Auguit 17 

POCmM IW>«NTAINS 

SUN N' FUN 

Juir 28 31 

MKSMM 

SWMM RSTIVAl 

Au^nf 70-16 

MOrg. O0f-bfOar MiwvriM 

nve^wtie Off ae^te^f 

MR. HA^Y 
TRAVH. SaVId 



WS-^46 



1 



wUI open to the public Fri- 
day. Additional information 
may be obtained from the 
museum at 622-1211. 

FRKK FILMS for childrei 
Saturday at 11 a.m. at two 
branch libraries are "The 
Headless Horseman" and 
"Swimmy" at the Virginia 
B^Kh branch and "Merry- 
Go-Round Horse," 
"Rumpelstiltritin" and "Three 
Little Wizarcb" at the Windsor 
Woods l»rahch. 



A WALKING tour ctf' 
the . Ghent section 

of Norfolk, sponsored by 
the Woman's Club of Norfolk, 
will be Saturday from 10 a.m. to 
2 p.m. Registration will be held 
at the Women's Club, 524 
FairfaxAve., NorfoUt, the same 
day at 9:30 a.m. Tickets are 
$2.50 each. Coffee and 
refreshments will be served. 
Proceeds benefit various 
charitable projects. 

GAMKS, food, a bazaar, 
white elephants and door prizes 
will be inchided in Cub Scout 
Pack 424's annual spring 
carnival Saturday from 10 a.m. 
to 4 p.m. at Louise Luxford 
Elementary School, 4808 
Haygood Road. 

A CARNIVAL sponsored by 
the Seatadc Elementary School 
PTA will be Saturday from 10 
a.m. to 5 p.m. at the school, 411 
Birdneck Circle. Games, 
rides and a country store will be 
included. Proceeds will be used 
to |Hu-chase curtains for the 
school auditorium stage. 

AN ART AUCTION sponsored 
by the B'nai B'rith Women, 
Norfolk chapter, will be Sunday 
at 2:30 p.m. at Military Circle 
Shopping Center in the north 
court. Viewing begins at, 1:30 
p.m. A raffle and drawing will 
be held for a hand-colored 
lithograph. Refreshments will 
be served. Proceeds benefit the 
group's charitable projects. 

FOR THE RECORD 

A 1WO-YKAR member of the 
Vurginia Beach Rescue Squad, 
R.S. Hill Jr., was named 
Squadsman of the Year at vSt 
recent annual installation and 
awarib banquet at the Ft. Stiry 
(Officers Chib. New officers 
installed inchide C. T. Dickson, 
caotain-elect: Ellis J. Mills, 
first lieutenant; Mr. Hill, second 
lieutenant; K. G. Riley, 
sergeant, and E. Randolph 
Pugh, plans and training. 
Directional officers are 
Virginia Gilpin, secretary; W. 
M. Holland, treasurer; M. G. 
Stone, ftind drive chairman; 
JeanK. Whilhoit, public relations 
and Alice E. Malbon, chaidain. 



A BOOK IFAIRwas held last 
week ' at Court House 
Elementary School with 600 
titles offered for sale. 
Educational games and posters 
also were available for the 
students. 

A TURTLK race was held at 
the April meeting of Cub Scout 
Pak 481 at Kings Grant Baptist 
Oiurch. Race winners were 
DonaM Prawl, Rex Hatter and 
David Griffin. Gardoa Scold 
advanced to Bobcate and Jerry 
Brown to Wolf. 

A RAINWATER regatta was 
the hi^Ught of the recent 
meeting of Cub Scout Pack 425. 
Winners were David 
Bridges, Derrick Shirley 
and Jimmy DriscoU. 
Herb VideU was awarded a <»ie- 
year service star, and Phillip 
Standi was welcomed into B(9 
Scout Tnxqi 432. 

Ittm may be mimitttd to Swi 
DU by maO. Heme imifl your imp 
Ice to Sun DU, Vk^k Beach Sm 
138 Rotemont Road, Vtr^nla Beadt 
Va. 23452. DeaOine b noon Fk- 
day i^tor to the week of public- 
aHon. 



FOOD 



4.' 



Low- fat can be delicious 



WI^ not try your hand at 
these ddicious knr<<aturatcd 
fat recipes? 

CHICKED 
ALA KING 

3 tablespoons oil 

4 Tabksixxms flour 

1 tMspowi salt 
Pqiper totarte 

3 cups chid(«) stock 
Oi»4Urd cup nonfat dry 

milk 

^ pound sliced mudrooms 
V4 cup diced green pqipo- 
V* cq) dMpped ptaniento 

2 cups cooked chidcen 

4 Tablespoons sherry 

1 Tablespoon chonwd pars* 
ley 

Heat oil in a saucepan, add 
flour, and cook briefly. 



stirring, four in chicken 
stodt, sttaitagomatantly until 
tlUck aid nMoth. Senon and 
^ in noitfiM dry nriOL Cook 1 
myute. 

Saute slicM muriirooms 
Mid Mid to sawx, alo^ widi 
cMdKn, fftm pqiper and 
pimiMito. Heat tooii^ Omi 
add Aerry. Ad^ seasoning 
and garnidi witt pardey. 
Serve with rice. Yield: 44 
servings (about 1 (piart) 

CHICKSM MARSALA 

Prqiared in a way usually 
reserved for veal, wine in 
chidien givto a certain flair. 

3 Chicken breasts (IVi 
pounds), donned and qdit 
and boned 

H lemon 



m teaqwons white pepper 
■•« cqi flour 

6 * Tablespoons polyun- 
y-'Sirturated oil 
^ pound muafaroons, slked 
>4 cup finely chopped onion 
2 Tablespoons <dive oil 
U cq) dry Marsala wine 

Squeeze the lemon over the 
chidten and qxtekle wiUi the 
salt and penxr; coat with 
flour. In a large skillet, heat 3 
taldetqioons of the oil ; add 
mushrooms and oirion and 
cook untU wilted; remove 
from skillet. 

To skills «ld ronaiiring (ril 
and the olive oil; ackl diidten 
and over moderate heat, 
brown lightly on both sides 10 
to 15 minutes. Add mushroom- 
onion mixtaire. 

Cover and simmer until 



r 



Easiest Swiss Steak 



" ^ clip 'ii' cook 



IH lbs. bofwlaa* b««f ehuck steak 

y* teaspoon •■N 

M cup Chopped onion 

Vk teaspoon HaNsli herbs 

% bay leaf 

1 (• 01.) can stewMl tomatoas 

2 taatpoona flour 

2 labiaspooni COM water 

llanieva oulsMa let and cut alaak into aarvlng plaeaa. Sptlnkla witli salt: brown under brollar, 
lumlns one*. Ramova and plaea In baUng disb. Stir onion, barbs and bay leaf Into loniatooa: 
pour ever steaks, covar UghHy and bake In 800 dograa ovan 1M hours. Skim oN any fat front 
surface. SUr flour Into coM water to make smooth pasta. Bland In laMaspoon of sauce from 
meat, than stir Into remaining sauce hi disb. Continue baking baaf IS minvtas longer until 
sauce Iblckans sHgbtly. Four sarvlnga. 



V 



diidtoi is tender — 18 to 15 
minutes. Add Qie Marsala | 
nine and hetf . Blaif«8 4 to 8 
servings^ 

STIRflllED 

ASPARilGUS 

2 rablapoons polyun- 
sataintedoil 

1 pound of aspMVgiM 
Satt 

3 Tablespoons of water 

When asparagtu is in ' 
season, take advanta^ of tlie 
rdativdy short ttme it v^ 
pears in tiie food msrtets. ■ 
Purdiase green fkredi looking ' 
staOcs with ti|^t kioking ^ 
Flill tips imttcate overHBfMiture 
stalks. Break the aipu:«gii8 ^ 
stalks whare eadi staOc brads 
natural^. IMscard Oie toagK 
end. Wadi under m^ng 
water or soak in cold w^er ■ 
for S miiutes. Cut tlw stalks ' 
into itach pieces. Heat the oU ' 
in a dtillet. Stir in the aapara* 
giis pieces and fry fat It 
minutes. Add the water and < 
salt. Cook for a few mora ' 
minutes untU uparagus is ' 
ri^t for your taste. 

— ■■MM (AdvRtiaBment) mmip 

FOOD 

FOR 

THOUGHT 

B; PAUL ROMAN 

A small pinch of sugar to 
the cooking water bringsl 
out the flavor of carrots; 



'Inherit the Wind' opens 
at Beach Little Theatre 



"Inherit the Wind" will open 
May 24 at the Little Theatre of 
Virginia Beach, 24th Street and 
Barberton Drive. 

The play stars Robert Fur- 



niss, Mac McManus, Marcia 
Bartusiak and Fred Jenks III 
with Bob Burchette, Fran 
Peterson and Charles Burledge. 
The show is directed by Pat 



Boy's Choir sings 
in nation's capital 



The Virginia Boys' Choir, a 
local musical group of 30 boys, 
wQi pertorm in l^ashington, 
D-C, Thursday. 

The choir was invited by Rep. 
G. William Whitehurst (R-Va.) 
to pertorm. Hie group will sing 
on the steps of the Capitol 
building at 11 a.m. Thursday. 

The following day, the choir 
will pertorm at Saint Albans 



School for Boys on the Grounds 
of the Washington Cathedral. 

The Washington performance 
is the group's first out-of-state 
singing engagement. The boys 
will be in the nation's capital 
through Sunday. 

The group also will pertorm 
May 20 at Thoroughgood 
Elementary School for the final 
PTA meeting of the school year. 



Bernick who is the drama 
teacher at Kempsville High 
School. 

Other cast members include 
J. Justice, Wirt Walker, Randy 
McClellan, Henry Highton, 
Sally Furniss, Steve Grabinsky, 
Carl Gotz, Roxy Webster, P.K. 
O'Meaghek, Lisa Cary, Flo 
Haynia, Randy Abbey, Craig 
McManus, Michael Thorpe and 
Laurie Watkins. Set design for 
the show has been done by 
Robert Coulsting. 

The play will run Fridays and 
Saturdays through June 8. 
Curtain time is 8:30 p.ni. for all 
performances. Tickets are $1.50 
for students and the military 
and $3 for adults. Reservations 
may be made by calling the 
Little Theatre at 428-9523. 



Add a teaspoon of curry 
powder to duinplings to go 
atop your bubbling 
chicken. 



A few drops of vinegar 
added to a pan when 
poaching eggs prevents 
them from breaking and 
makes the whites a good 
color. 



FOR AN ENJOYABLE 
MEAL ■ SPEaAUZING 
IN CHARBROIUBD 
STEAKS, MEXICAN FOOD 
AND LOW. LOW PRICES 
TRY THE 




400 LASKIN ROAD 




'<i./-. It' 



Ctit.^OH 



BF \i n s VI oNs 



Shampoo 8 Sal.... From $3.45 

Complaia farmonant Wovas .«....$6.95 to $19.95 

Roox Fonci-Tono Touch-op From $5.00 

Roux Frosting '(St^inpoo S Sal Extra) $12.50 

Haircut „ $2.75 (Loiftg Ha1r $3^ 

No /^^intment Necessary - Just Come In 

HILLTOP 
DAILY -8 TIL 6:30 



Hilltop Ptu* Shopping Cantar 
iMUn Rd. N«xt to Safaway 
nioifci 42S-9S97 
Va. Baach 



DAILY - 9 'TIL 6 
THURS. - 9 'TIL 9 



911S Va. Baach Blvd. 
AcroH from OEX 
Rionas 497-9769 
Va, 



1734 E. 

Uttla Craak Rd. 
Naxt to zayras 
Phona: Sla9093 
Norfolk , 



PW^It^W^H^W^W^W^W^W^W^**^ ^ ! ^ ■ >I ^1 >^W ^ H ^W ^ <«^>»^ W ^W^ <I ^ W^«^>| ^ <»^W^W ^ W^I ^W^> I^» I ^>I < 



OPEN HOUSE 

Saturday, May 18th - 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. 
MONTiSSORI CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER 

4501 N. Witchduck Road 

((^ Imkpentkmsa avd.) 

Roglstration b«lng tok«ii for Summor and Fall 2 
yrs. old - 4tli grado - Day Cora - Montossorl Clattot 

6s45 a.ni. to 6 p.iiu 

LAIIOE FENCED PLAYOROUND ■ Allt COMDfTfOMED 
HOT LUNCH S7A7i LfCEMSED • QUAUritD TiACHiKS 

Opon Yeor 'Round - Summor Program 

PHONE 497-2422 



GaiiteWUKr,Dtaectar 
,AiM.Oir. 



-*#» ' *' ' «# ^ «»*# ^«**»M W i»« » » » w »» i ^ w# <i # 




mg^/m^m 



mmmm 



wmmmmimmHm 



mm 



t^mmm'itmmi^fvigm 



Reli gion 



The Sun-Wedn«day. May 15, 1974-PagB B-3 



*l 



CHURCH 
NOTES 



"WOMKN'S ROLE in the 
Church in a Time of Change" 
will be the topic of a talk by 
Aileen Rucker at Tuesday's 
Virginia Beach Episcopal 
Women's Convocation at 
Eastern Shore Chapel. The 
convocation will begin at 10 
a.m. with communion and is 
scheduled to end at 2 p.m. 

STKAWRKKKIES and ice 
cr^m will be on the dessert 
menu at the 12th annual 
Strawberry Festival sponsored 
by the women of St. Margaret's 
Circle at Old Donation 
Episcopal Church Friday at 
12:30 p.m. The spring event 
includes a fashion show and 
dessert. The public is invited. 
Donation is $1.50. Tickets may 
be obtained by calling the 
parish office at 497-0563. 



? SAY HAPPY birthday today 
(o Foundry United Methodist 
phurch. The church, at 2801 
Virginia Beach Blvd.,, 
Mebrates its 14th birthday. 

i 

; "THE PARABLE." a movie 
bi the context of worship, 
followed by comments, will be 
shown in the social hall of. 
Virginia Beach United 
Methodist Church Sunday at 
?:30 p.m. 

\ 

] A DISTRICT prayer break- 
fast for United Methodist 
iVomenwillbeMay24at9:30a.m. 
it Thalia United Methodist 
^urch, 221 N. Fir Ave. The 
program will be "Echoes From 
fletreat" and will cost $1.25 
tach. Reservations may be 
4i«de t^ calling 340-5015. A 
nursery will be provided. 



ALL OFFICERS and circle 
leacters are asked to attend the 
meeting of the Executive 
Council of the United Methodist 
Women Sunday at 7 p.m. at 
Foundry United Methodist 
Church, 2801 Virginia Beach 
Blvd. Sunday's meeting is the 
final meeting before summer. 



UNITED Methodist Men will 
meet at the sanctuary of 
Foundry United Methodist 
Church Monday at 6:30 p.m. 
Burnett Thompson, ad- 
ministrative assistant to Rep. 
G. William Whitehurst (K-Va.). 
will be the speaker. A catered 
supper will I3e served. 



CHURCH SCHOOLS all over 
town need workers this sum- 
mer. TTie request for volunteers 
this week comes from Baylake 
United Methodist Church, 4300 
Shore Drive. Bible School for 
children of the church will be 
June 17-21. Teachers, helpers, 
crafts workers and especially 
. smiling faces are needed daily 
from 9:30a.m. to noon. About 24 
workers are needed. Volunteer 
by calling Dot Etchison at 464- 
4231. 



BIBLE STUDY classes for 
youth and adults will be held at 
Bayside Baptist Church, 1920 
Pleasure House Road, May 26- 
29. The Rev. David L. Henry, 
pastor, will teach the classes, 
concentrating on the book of 
Isaiah. Classes will meet May 
26 (6-7:45 p.m.). May 27 (7:30- 
8:45 p.m.). May 28 (7:30-8:45 
p.m.) and May 29 (7:15-8:30 
p.m.). 




Peace to be found 



There's always peace and beauty to 
be found at the shrine at The Star of 



The Sea Catholic Church, 14th Street 
and Pacific Avenue. (Sun photo by 
Rod Mann) 



Contact number 




Sun shines on I is 428-2211 
Religion news 



S^d us your news! 

The weekly religion page in The Sun is the 
))lacf to piMiciile special events. If yoar 
chui^ or synagogue is planning something 
^^cial, let The Sun know. 

I^nd news of religious activities to the 
Vli^nia Beach Sun, 138, Rosemont Road, 
Vilginia Beach, Va. 23452. 



i 



:S 



kisi^f^m^<!msmx 



J 



The telephone number for 
Contact, a new telephone 
counseling service sponsored by 
two local churches, was inad- 
vertently printed incorrectly on 
this page last week. 

The correct telephone 
number was printed on Page 1 
of last week's edition. 

The Contact telephone 
number is 428-2211. 



ONGmY 



f^Bptkis start 

^yer week 

?, 

for missions 

i 

.?'We...the Resources" is the 
tl|eme of the Norfolk Baptist 
Association's observance 
o(i Week of Prayer for City 
Missions this week. 

!The work (rf the associaticMi 
aJMi its missionaries will be 
e^iphasized through fx-ayer and 
social offerings. 

faring the we^ of prayer, 
Ekptist dutch members are 
a^ed to visit the East Ocean 
\Tew Center, the Baptist 
Sfudent Union Center and the 
iirfolk Baptist Association 
ifkes at 4864 Shell Road in 
rginia Beach. 

uring the special week cf 
yer, offerings received will 
applied to the capital funds 
am of the Ncrfdk Baptist 
ociation. 



Need help? Phone -In TV »-i— 



The 



CUJB 



%» 



featuring 

Pat Robertson 

8PM wceknights 



■-^■<.i^-: 



WXRI 



105 



STRONq 
ckuRclfES 




IVIAkc STRONq 



• • 



COMIVIUNITIES 







m iMt Fmm taM • Dm INrM'^ 



! If you haw just moved, 
l It's time to call your 
Welcome Wagon hoetess. 

Phone 340-2131 

If yoy ar* IntanMad In gattlng 
■nfwnwtlon •bout taint * 
WatconM wtfon HotMs, fill 
out th« followint coupon 



I ^toifM! . 






MM toi D W lcon w Wafon 
»W «OR|i> M. CMM 



A THOUGHT 




TODAY 
MAY 15, 1974 



PSALM 133 

) Behold, how good and 
how pleasant it is for 
brethren to dwell 

lt(^ether in unity! 

2 It is like the preci(His 
I ointment upon the 
jhead, that ran down 

upm tiie beard, even 
I Aaron's beard: that 
went cbwn to the skirts 
oi his garmaits: 

3 As the dew of 
H^nmon, and as the 

I dew that descended 
upoi the nrauntaiis erf 
'Son: for Uier« tte 
I U)RD c<MnmAiMkd t)» 
Uessii^, ev»i life for 
' evermore. 



Emmanuel Tabernacle 
ChMrch-UPC 

157 Mmriion Ave. 

(1 bkMkoffS. Lynnhtven Rd.) 
Rev. HiroM Hidkm-PHtcH 
Phone: 340-7333 



BAYLAKE UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 

4300 Shoie Drive 
Vt. Beach - 464-2423 

Byron S. Hallstead 
Minister 

SUNDAY SERVICES 

CSiwch St^ooi 9:30 AJ«. 
Motniiv WonUp ll:OQ A.M. 
VISTORS ARE WELCOME. 



TIDEWATER CENTRAL 
CHURCH OF THE 
NAZARENE 

Rev. David HoUein, hrtor 

5S14 taUaMMt n. 49741703 
9mfixf School lb. • 9:43 A.M. 
How of Tnimiifc 10:50 AJI. 
Jmior, Yo«fli, * AiMt 
MtowMp • 6:00 P.M. 
How of ta^rtoR -7:00 P.M. 
W«*m^ ai.«fed( 



-^HteCK CHURCH 

640KempivOleR(L Hi. 499-3727 
^^ilnia Beach 

Sunilay 

SMiaay Sclwel «:4S A.M. 

Mvninf «Verihip 11:04 A.M. 

EvaiiMfl Warihia 7:N P.M. 

TMttday 

MorilMI tWariKip ie:M A.M. 

EvMiat Worililp 7:M P.M. 

Thuridav 

Mamint Wartlila l«:M A.M. 

EvMin* Worlhip 7:10 P.M. 

NWMry AvatMM* 
PASTORS 



Rev. John OimeiMi 



Rav.AnnOlnwnai 



FIRSTCHURCH 
OF CHRIST 
SCIENTIST 
Virginia Beach 
1341 Laskin Rd. 
Sunday 
Church Service 11:00 AM 
Sunday ScheM 11:00 AM 
Wednesday 

Testimony Meeting 1:00 
PM 

Christian Scientist 

ReediRg R«em 

( same address as above) 

Monday thru Saturday 

11:00 am te]:OOPM 

Also Open Tuesday Evening 

7:00 PM to* :00 PM 

Everyone is welcome to 
Study, Borrow, or Buy 
Autheriied Christian 
Scientist Literature and the 
King James Version ol the 
BIMe. 

Christian ScienHtt Monitor 
is also availaBie. 



1 



ST 



Assembly of God 



(Comer Va. Beach Blvd. 
Oceana Blvd.) 

S. BeOet, Pastor 
42B-5197 



EMMANUEL BAPTIST 

CHUiKM 

4750 Baxter Rd.Va. Beach 
Ptatot: W. P. Gtandatafr 
Rionc: 497-42(M 

Sunday School: 9:45 AJI. 

(AUAgH) 
PMachu^ Seivii^: 11:00 A.M. 
E\«nii4 PieacM^ 7:00 P.M. 

WedMsday 7:30 P.M. 
PtayerA BiMe Study 
Varied YouOi ActivWes 



WELCOME TO WORSHIP 

ANDwrmEsswini 

ST. MARK A.M.E. 

CHURCH 

i. Alton Butts, Minuter 
17M rotten Rd. Virginia 
Bew*.V». 

SkaAy Phone 428-1330 
aisch SdMoi - 9:30 A.M. 
DiTiiie Wordtip - 1 1 :00 A.M.| 
W«ineiday - 7:00 P.M. 
The Tndiii^ MinMry 
Wednesday -8:30 P.M. 
He Cliurcto at ftvfm 



UNITED METHODIST 

Church plans expansion 



Expansion is in the worics now that 
Virginia Beach United Methodist Church 
has acquired the old Austin Motel 
property next door to the church at I9th 
Street. 

The motel hems in the church's new 
educational building and had been 
considered the key to opening up the 
church to 19th Street. Virginia Beach 
United Methodist is at 207 18th St. 

Plans are in the works to increase the 
parking area and use Pacific Avenue as 
an exit from the church. 

THE CHURCH paid $62,500 for the 
property. It assumed a mortage of 



$21,803 and negotiated a loan with a local 
bank for the remainder of the purchase 
price. 

The motel has been leased from the 
church by a local innkeeper who will 
operate it during this year's tourist 
season. 

Pastor Donald H. Seely said the church 
hopes to tear down the motel at the end of 
the season for expansion of the church 
property. 

Negotiations were handled by Harold 
B. Kellam, chairman of the church 
trustees, Thomas Broyles, Col. Aubrey 
Holmes and Earl Slattum. 



NEWSPAPER 

CARRIER BOYS 
AND GIRLS 

MUST BE 12 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER 
If you would like to earn extra 
money and live In any of the 
areas listed below, call 
486-3430, Monday thru Friday 

THESE ARE THE AREAS 
WHERE CARRIERS 
ARE NEEDED 




GATEWOOD PARK 
REGENCY APTS. 
SELLAMY MANOR 
WOODHURST 
CARDINAL ESTATES 
WASHINGTON SQUARE 
LYNNWOOD 
CAROLANNE FARMS 
CHANTICLEAR APTS. 
GREAT NECK MANOR 
Call today and start aaming 

486-343a 



BAYLAKE PINES 
WEBLIN PLACE 
HAMPTONS 
NOTTINGHAM ESTATES 
TIMBERLAKE 
AVALON HILLS 
LYNNHAVEN SHORES 
LYNNHAVEN COLONY 
GREAT NECK ESTATES 
BIRDNECK VILLAGE 
that axtra money right nowl 

CIrculatlen ^ 



Religion Page Sponsors 



PRICE'S 

INCORPORATED 

BRAND NAME 

Appllancmt 

rv Stereo 




PRINCESS ANNE 
EQUIPMENT CORP. 

504^!^NMIIItary Hwy. 

Virginia Boach, Va. 
Pliona420- 1840 

John Deere Jqulpment 



ASPHALT 

ROADS 

& 

MATERIALS 

Plione - 497-3591 



CONTRACTORS 
PAVING CO. INC. 

3779 Bonney Road 
Phone • 340-1161 



PEOPLE 
_ BANK 

OF VIRGfNIA BEACH 



<^CH ^i^ 



Offices Tfiroughout Virginia Beacli 



425-5077 



First In Free Checking 
First In $plr|/rc/oy Bonk/ng 



THERE IS A 
DIFFBRCNCE 

TRY 

Beach FortI 



I 






1 38 Rosemont Road 

Va. Beach 
PKone — 486-3430 



KEMPSVILLE 
PHARMACY 

5266 PRINCESS ANNE RD. 
VIRGINIA BEACH, VIRGINIA 

497-3516 



3ol|n lull 
PublirkHflUfip 

LUNCHEON SPECIALS 

n.4o "P 

Including salad & biv«rage 
3600 Bonnay Rd. 340-9463 



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Page B-4-The Sun— Wednesday, May 15, 1974 




Junel 



Buses may be on the road 



A review 
of Naval 
warfare 



ByUiUkis^ 



Many of us are of the opinion that amphibious warfare is 
a product of modern day times, dating from the World 
War I! era. Actually, however, amphibious warfare is as 
old j» war itself, dating back to centuries before the birth 
of Jesus Christ. Such warfare basically began when man 
first took the boats on water to transport men and 
equipment to and from battle scenes. 

These facts are illustrated in the Amphibious Museum 
at |he Little Creek Naval Amphibious Base, which con- 
tains displays of equipment used in amphibious warfare 
from 1500 B.C. to modern times. The variety of items on 
display ranges from a model of a Roman "Bireme", a 
ship powered by oars in battles during Ceasar's time, to 
recently developed guns and miniature two-men sub- 
marines. Lt. Cmdr. B.R. Bunce, museum director, says 
"We've go! everything from saltwater soap to a 16-inch 
projectile" 

TIIK Ml'SEUM HAS an inventory of some 500 items, 
including weapons, equipment and uniforms of am- 
phibious forces. Cmdr. Bunce points out it is practically 
impossible to place a dollar figure on the value of the 
inventory since some of the artifacts are originals and 
can'l be replaced. 

These artifacts include portions of the uniform, sword 
and scabbard of Rear Adm. R.L. Brainard, USN, who was 
the first Amphibious Force Atlantic commander and 
personal belongings to Maj. Gen. H.M. Smith, USMC, 
classified as the father of modern amphibious warfare 
operations. Other items include ships helms and navy 
guns dating back lo 1874 

Among the more extensive displays is a mock-up of an 
amphibious assault landing operation, including over 70 
models of the various types of ships involved. The display 
was constructed by the team of four men responsible for 
daily operation of the museum. 

TIIOSK WHO SERVE under Cmdr. Bunce are petty 
officers K.C. Blomberg and R.A. Hayes and Airman J.B. 
Kinard and J.C. Byrnes. The Navy personnel are assigned 
to the museum on temporary duty. Mr. Byrnes is a 
civilian who was formerly curator of the Army museum at 
Ft . Myer. All have extensive backgrounds in the history of 
amphibious warfare. 

Almost 2,000 people tour the facility each month. These 
include numerous Naval Junior Reserve Officer Training 
Corps units from high schools throughout the country who 
visit the museum as part of their training. 

The general public is invited to tour the museum 
Saturdays and Sundays from 1 to 5 p.m. Special tours can 
be arranged for groups at their convience. These 
arrangements should be made in advance by calling the 
museum at 464-8130. The museum is located on 
Amphibious Drive adjacent to the Amphibious Base 
dispensary. 



Virginia Beach came one step ' 
closer to getting bus service 
Monday. 

The Virginia Beach City 
Council unanimously approved 
a contract with the City of 
Norfolk to provide bus 
transportation to the Beach. The 
Norfolk City Council was to take 
the contract under 

consideration Tuesday. 

If the contract is signed by 
Norfolk this week, it will be 
about June 1 before any buses 
are actually on the road. George 
Times, an assistant to the city 
manager, explained that the 
two to three week delay in 
starting the service will allow 
Norfolk's Tidewater Metro 
Transit Co. (TMT), time to hire 
and train additional drivers for 
the Beach service. 

Beach city officials have been 



working with Norfolk city staff 
members, TMT officials and 
representative of the Tidewater 
Transportation District (TTD) 
for months now trying to get bus 
service restored in the Beach— 
at least until TTD is able to 
establish a regional transit 
service. 

THE BEACH Council has 
agreed X%, subsidize TMT 
operation in the Beach up to 
$150,000. The contract calls for 
the Beach to have control over 
rout^ and schedules of the 
sevice, as well as having the 
responsibility for any losses 
incurred by the City of Norfolk 
«• TMT. The contract is to be 



Unding one year. 

The Council also agreed 
Monday to enter into an 
agreement with other cities in 
the TTD to. provide interim 
capital funds for "the 
acquistion, consolidation, 
rehabilitation and expansion of 
public transportation in the 
four-city area." Virginia Beach, 
Norfolk, Portsmouth and 
Chesapeake are members of the 
TTD commission. 

The Beach's share of the 
transportation district's fhrst 
capital program is $84,630. The 
entire program wrD cost 
$11,150,000, including state and 
federal funds. 



Council 

okays 

market 



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RENT A 

MOTOR 
HOME 



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CALL 

424-2678 



Tax bills 
In the mail 



Resittents of the Lynnhaven 
Cdony wiU get a new modem 
Be-Lo mpermarket— much to 
tMr (tfstaste. 

Members of the Virginia 
Beach City Council voted 8-3- 
Monday to rezone a portion of 
land off Shore Drive from R-8 
Residential District to* B-2 
Community Business District. 
TheBe-LoMarket, which is now 
located m an adjacent lot on 
Shore Drive, will move out of 
their leased building into a new 
building to be cfflitnicted on the 
rezoned land. 

Attorney Grover Wright, 
speaking for the applicant 
Clyde Absalom, told the Council 
the land should be rezoned like 
nei^bming properties. (The 
area is divided with part 
business district along Shore 
Drive and a residential district 
ajoiningit.) 



RESIDENTS OPPOSIN.G the 

rraonihg application pleaded 
that if the lot went dommercial, 
eventually all surrounding 
vacant land would be rezoned, 
and would downgrade the 
neighbwhood. 

Voting for the rezffliing were 
Robert Callis, Robert 
Cromwell, George Ferrell, Dr. 
Clarence Holland, Garland 
Isdell, Murray M^lbon, Curtis 
Payne and Floyd Waterfield. 
Voting to deny the application 



were Reid Ervin. Charles 
GardiM* and John Baum. 

The Council unanimously 
approved: 

• a change of zoning petition 
by Eleanor and Neill McRae Jr. 
from R-8 Residential District to 
0-1 Office District on property in 
the Lynnhaven Village Area: 

• a change of zoning petition 
by Judy Andrassy from R-5 
Residential to A-4 Apartment 
Dmtrict on property in the 
Birdneck Village area of 
Lynnhaven Borough; 

• a change of zoning petition 
by The Southland Employees 
Trust from R-9 Residential 
Townhouse District to B-2 
Community Business District 
on property in the Princess Anne 
Plaza Area (Reid, Ervin 
abstained from voting) ; 

• a zoning change petition of 
Ella L. Johnson from R-8 
Residential to 1-1 Light 
Industrial District on property 
in the Oceana Garden area (Mr. 
Ervin abstained from voting); 

The Council unanimously 
denied: 

t the petition for a change of 
zoning by Senaca Campsites 
from AG-1 to A-1 Apartment 
District on Property in the 
Pungo Borough; 

t the petition for a change of 
zoning by Senaca Campsites for 
a Conditional Use Permit to 
operate a mobile home park in 
the Pungo Borough. 



i^'S-l'SSfft'Si'SSSffSWR'SR^RWS 



If you heaved a sigh of relief 
last mcmth after you'd filed 
federal and state tax bills, 
beware. City personal property 
and real estate tax bills will be 
mailed to Beach residents this 
week. 

An individual's personal 
property tax is assessed only on 
automobiles registered in the 
city. Tax is based on the 
National Automobile Dealers 
Association's estimated worth 
of the vehicle which a person 
owned Jan. 1 in Virginia Beach. 

The City Treasurer's Office 
computes 35 per cent of the 
vehicle's estimated worth and 



BOZO'S BIG 




2:30 PM WEEKDAYS 




assesses the owner $6 on every 
$100 of value. (In other words, if 
you own a car valuedat $2,000, 
you will pay $42 personal 
property tax.) 

REAL ESTATE TAX is levied 
on all persons who own property 
in the city. The tax assessment 
is based on 60 per cent of the fair 
market value of the prq)erty. A 
tax rate from $1.56 to $1.70 
(depending on which bwough 
the property is in) is applied to 
every $100 of 60 per cent of the 
fair market value. 

Payments are due in the City 
Treasurer's Office June 10. 
Persons with an overdue bill 
will be charged a penalty of five 
per cent of the tax due. Any 
person with a bill that ronains 
unpaid for more than six 
months will be assessed a half 
percent interest (on the amount 
due) every month, after the six 
months that the bill is 
delinquent. 

According to the city budget, 
the city anticipates $3.1 million 
in personal property tax and $19 
million in real estate tax to be 
paid this year. 



ROLL CALL 



WASHINGTON — Here's how 
area Members of Congress 
were recorded on majw roll call 
votes May 2 thrau^ May 8. 

HOUSE 

METRIC CONVERSION: 

Rejected, 153 for and 240 
against, a motion to suspend the 
rules and pass, with no 
amendments permitted, a bill 
calling for voluntary U.S. 
conversion to the metric 
system. 

The bill (H.R. 11035) would 
have set a ten-year conversion 
period and established a 
presidential commission to 
coordinate the process. It also 
would have permitted federal 
loans to small businesses that 
experience economic hardship 
due to conversion. 

Supporters argues that 
conversion is inevitable, and 
the sooner it is begun the less 
costly it \^ilt be. 

Many members who favored 
conversion voted against the 
motion because they wanted to 
offer amendments to include 
carpenters, mechanics and 
other individuals in the loan 



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provisions. 

Some members totally 
opposed conversion. Among 
them, Rep. H.R. Gross (R- 
lowa) lamented that under the 
metric system "you won't be 
able to walk a mile for a 
camel." 

Reps. Thomas Downing (D-1) 
and Joel Broyhili (R-10) voted 
"yea." 

Reps. William Whitehurst (R- 
2), David Satterfield (D-3), 
Robert Daniel (R-4), W.C. 
Daniel (D-5), Caldwell Butler 
(R-6), Kenneth Robinson (R-7), 
Stanford Parrls (R-8) and 
William Wampler (R-9) voted 
"nay." 

POSTCARD VOTE 
REGISTRATION: Rejected, 
197 for and 204 against, a rule 
that would have permitted floor 
consideration of a bill to let 
voters register by mail for 
federal elections. The General 
Accounting Office would have 
administered the program. 

In rejecting the rule, the 
House |n effect defeated the bill 
(H.R. '8053). The bill'? intent 
was to mal(e it easier to 
register. 

Labor unions, Common 
Cause, the League of Women 
Voters and Americans for 
Democratic Action lobbied for 
the bill. 

The National Municipal 
League, the National 
Association of Secretaries of 
State, the American 

Conservative Union and the 
American Civil Liberties Union 
lobbied against it. 

Supporters said that easier 
registration would counteract 
declining voter participation in 
federal elections. 

Opponents argued that mail 
registration would invite vote 
fraud. Rep. James Quillen (R- 
Tenn) said the bill would 
"wreak havoc" with the 



RUBY GILLIAM 

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR 



A Coll In The ^ght Direction 

It's bad enough having a pr(^lem or question on bankmg . . . but it's even 
worse being unable to reach someone for help. 

Ruby makes certain that, for whatever reason you may be calling, you get a 
prompt, courteous and Informative reply. 

It's her sense of responsibility that makes her good, but it's her response- 
iriaitity that makes her indis^ns^le. 

PEOPLE'S 
BANK 

OF VIRGINIA BEACH ^ „,„„ 

^>f MEMBER FDIC 

FIRST IN FREE CHECKING • F«ST IN SATURDAY BANKING 
iMkm Road • Kem|»ville • Bayside • Lynnlavm • Chin»e Coriw • lndi»t River Road 

Fhofw 4:^^77 • Member FDIC 
. THftBANK THAT MAKgS IT HAPPEN 



Announcing 

NEW CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES 
FOR INDIVIDUALS AND BUSINESSES 



Now you can run a classified ad for only ISi per line of type, 
(minimum charge $2.) Take advantage of these lower rates to 
reach over 22 ,000 homes each Wednesday . 



MAIL IN YOUR SUNSHINE ADI 



A lot of peo|de have asked how they can place a Sunshine Ad without anyone knowing 
about it. Clip out the coupon below and mail it in with your message and enclose the 
correct amount. First nones or initials only are acceptable in Sunshine Ads. 



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Minimum Charge ^ 

If Ovsr 32 Average Words, Add 2U For Each Additional 4 Words. 

MAIL TOs 

SUNSHINE ADS 

138 Rosemont Road 

Virginia Baacli. Va. 23452 



IT FAYS to ADViRTISi IN SUN CLASSIPIiDSI 

— — — — t - 



election process. 

Dowing, Whitehurst, 
Satterfield, Robert Daniel, 
W.C. Daniel, Butler, Robinson, 
Parrls, Wampler and Broyhili 
voted "nay." 



OIL SHIPPING: Passed, 226 
for and 136 against, a bill to 
require that at least 20 per cent 
of the oil imported for domestic 
consumption must be carried on 
U.S. flag ships. 

The bill (H.R. 8193) has the 
effect of guaranteeing business 
for American shipping 
interests, business that might 
otherwise go to less-expensive 
foreign shippers. 

Supporters argued that 
America should be as 
independent as possible from 
foreign control of her oil needs. 
They said the bill would open 
jobs and help America's 
balance-of-payment position. 

Opponents argued that the 
bill is anti-consumer legislation 
that will boost the price of 
gasoline by at least one cent per 
gallon. 

Downing, Whitehurst, 
Satterfield, Robert Daniel, W.C. 
Daniel, Parris andBroyhill 
voted "year." 

Butler, Robinson 'and 
Wampler voted "nay." 

SENATE 

VIET FUND CEILINO; 

Passed, 43 for and 38 against, an 
amendment to keep the 
previously-enacted military aid 
ceiling to South Vietnam at 
SI. 126 billion. 

The amendment forbade 
spending more than that 
amount in fiscal 1974. The 
Pentagon had sought 
permission to spend $266 million 
that had been appropriated, but 
not spent. In previous fiscal 
years. 

The amendmerft was 
attached to S. 2999, a routine 
supplemental appropriations 
bill that now goes to conference 
with the House. 

Supporters argued that the 
Pentagon must keep within its 
spending limits. Sen. Edward 
Kennedy (D Mass) said 
Congress should not permit "an 
accountant's sleight-of-hand" 
to reward the Pentagon with 
money "through the back 
door." Sen. Stuart Symington 
(D-AAo) said "the time has 
come to hold the line." 

Opponents argued that the 
Pentagon was not seeking "new 
money," but merely authority 
to honor previous 

commitments. Sen. John Tower 
(R Texas) said the strictly- 
worded amendment would cut 
off money needed to look for 
MIA's in Southeast Asia. 

Sens. Harry Byrd (I) and 
William Scott (R) voted "nay." 

HOSPITAL UNIONS: 

Passed, 63 for and 25 against, a 
bill to give employees of non- 
profit hospitals and nursing 
homes the right to organize 
unions. The bill does not affect 
public hospitals. 

The bill (S. 3203) would 
preempt state laws that forbid 
such unions. It now goes to the 
House. 

Supporters argued that the 
bill strikes a balance between 
employees' needs to unionize 
and hospitals' obligations to 
provide contlnuo\^r:^ealth care. 
Sen. Huber Humphrey CD- 
Minn) said, "It Is simply 
unfair" to deny union access to 
hospital workers. 

Opponents argued that 
permitting unions in hospitals 
will expose hospitals to strikers 
and walkouts that will 
endanger the lives of patients. 

Byrd and Scott voted "nay." 

OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY: 

Tabled, 47 for and 40 against, an 
amendment to take the sting out 
of the Occupational Safety and 
Health Act ol 1970. 

The amendment was offered^ 
to an unrelated bill on hospital 
unions <above). 

The OHSA established certain 
safety conditions that 
employers must meet. The 
amendment would have 
substituted discretionary, 
penalties for the act's 
nr^andatory penalties for 
violators, and would have 
broadened an employer's 
ability to appeal adverse 
findings. 

In tabling the amendmentH 
the Senate voted to kill the 
softening provisions. 

Those voting tor tabling 
argued that Congress should 
wait on a pending General 
Accounting Office review of the 
new law before changing it. 

Opponents argued that 
overzealous OSHA inspectors 
have persecuted employers, 
especially small businessmen, 
and that the Congress should 
act immediately to improve the 
law Sen Carl Curtis (R Neb) 
said that labor union bosses 
have used ttie act as an 
wganiting tool. , 

Byrd and Scott votetf ^iy " 



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Shopping center 
plans approved 



A 147,000 square foot shopping crater 
planned for construction across Shore 
Drive from the Naval Amphibious Base, 
Little Creek, was recommended for 
approval Tuesday by the Virginia Beach 
Planning Commission. 

The Planning Commission agreed 
with the findings of the city planning 
staff, which recommended that the 
shopping center application be ap- 
proved. 

The center will be called Gator 
Shores Plaza and will be developed 
across the street from the Little Creek 
base near the intersection of Indepen- 
dence Boulevard and Shore Drive. 

W.W.D. Associates, developers of the 
center, applied for a change of zoning to 
convert 13.31 acres of land from 
residential to business use. The 
developers have a long-term lease on the 
land. 

II. CALVIN SPAIN, attorney for the 
developers, said construction of the 
shopping center will not begin until next 
spring. 

The Lake Shores Civic League op- 
posed the zoning change. League 
President Richard Zoller said the .center 
would create drainage problems in the 
area, would overload sewage facilities 



and wmild cause adjoining property 
values to decline. He also told the 
commissioners that adequate shopping 
facilities already exist in the area. 

The developers have met with 
several city departments, Mr. Spain 
said, and have worked out plans to solve 
sewage and drainage problems ^ 

TlIK PROPERTY Was originally 
planned for apartments, but the 
developers withdrew their original 
application because it was 
"premature," Mr. Spaiif'said. 

Two additional parcels of land ad- 
jacent to the shopping center site also 
were recommended for rezoning from 
business and residential use to a hotel 
district. The developers plan to expand 
an existing Econo-Travel Motor Hotel on 
the site, Mr. Spain said. 

Before constructing the shopping 
center, the developers will be required to 
dedicate to the city an 80-foot right of 
way from the centerline of Shore Drive. 
The developers also will pay for a 
drainage system to alleviate flooding 
problems in the area and will provide 
adequate screening from surrounding 
residential areas, Mr. Spain said. 

Commissioner Sam Houston Sr. cast 
the lone dissenting vote against the 
change of zoning. 



Old phone 
books can 
save frees 



Virginia Beach school 
children will participate in the 
second annual "Save a Tree" 
program next week to be ob- 
served simultaneously in the 
four southside Hampton Roads 
cities. 

Ttie Save a Tree program is 
planned to help children learn 
about the ecology and the im- 
portance of preserving the 
country's forests. 

The children will be asked to 
collect out-of-date telephone 
books for delivery to paper 
recycling plants. Money raised 
from the sale of the phone books 
is used to buy school materials. 



KACII SCIIOOl. having all of 
its students participate in the 
program will receive a tree 
from the city of Virginia Beach. 
Plaques will be given to schools 
collecting the largest number of 
telephone books. 

Students who collect the most 
books will be awarded pine 
seedlings to plant. 

The Virginia Beach Council of 
Federated Woman's Clubs, 
local PTA chapters and several 
municipal departments and 
private businesses are 
cooperating in the Save a Tree 
program 



Drug charges sent 
to Circuit Court 



Gordon Harris, 21, is awaiting 
action by a Circuit Court grand 
jury on charges of possession of 
marijuana with intent to 
distribute. Judge P. B. White 
forwarded the charges Friday 
following a preliminary hearing, 
in General District Court. 

During the hearing detective 
D.H. Kappers testified he 
arrested Mr. Harris March 15 at 
his Norfolk Avenue apartment 
when he found approximately a 
pound marijuana in the 
residence, packaged in one 



ounce wrappCTS 

Detective Kappers stated that 
when he entered Mr. Harris's 
home he was standing by his 
bed and dropped three bags of 
marijuana, and $15 in cash on 
the bed. Detective Kappers 
said he went to Mr. Harris's 
apartment with a search 
warrant based on information 
from an informant. 

Mr. Harris was permitted to 
remain free on bond pending 
further legal proceedings. 



Art theft reported 



Police are investigating the 
reported theft of several 
paintings valued at $5,000 from 
the Oceanfront home of Mrs. 
Nathon Supak. 

Mrs. Supak is quoted with 
saying the paintings and an 
oriental rug valued at $1,000 
were taken from the home 



during the night of May 8 while 
she and her maid were asleep. 
It is believed entry into the 
home was made through a 
sliding glass door. 

At last reports, police were 
searching for suspects in the 
reported theft. 



KeHam named 
to Westeyan 
advisory seat 



Harold B. KeUam was named 
an officer of the President's 
Advisory Council at Virginia 
Wesleyan College during the 
recent spring luncheon meeting 
of the 43-member council. 

Mr. Kellam, a resident of 
Virginia Beach, will serve as a 
vice-chairman of the council. 
He is a partner in Kellam-Eaton 
Insurance Co., president of the 
K & E Corp. and a director of 
WVAB Radio. 

He also is a past president of 
the Virginia Beach Chamber of 
Commerce and a member of 
Virginia Beach United 
Methodist Church. 

P. Stockton Fleming of 
Portsmouth was named council 
chairman and Vincent J. 
Thomas of Norfolk was named a 
vice-chairman. 



LiOALS 



Robbery sentence set 



Vincent S. Price, 23, was 
sentenced Thursday to ten 
years in prison, with five years 
suspended, in Circuit Court 
following his conviction of 
armed roM)ery. 

Judge Philip L. Russo ruled 
the unsuspended time be served 
consecutively with another five 
year sentence from a previous 
armed robbery conviction. 



making a total of ten years to 
serve. He will be eligible for 
parole in two-and-a-half years. 
Mr. Price, who is presently 
confined to the Southampton 
state prison facility, was con- 
victed of participating in the 
March 2 armed robbery of the 
Pembroke Square Apartment 
Rental Office on Broad Street in 
which $600 was stolen 



Births 



Mr. and Mrs. 



H8mllto|Lj|^ebb, 



Laurence 

Jr., twin 

daughterly 

Mr. and Mrs. William Joseph 
Johnson, daughter. ' 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Wayne 
Sharpies, son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence 
Edward LIverman, son,^ 

Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Arthur 
Dennis, daughter. , 

Mr. & Mrs. Llnwood Casey 
Archer, Jr., son. 

Mr. & Mrs. James Forrest 
Bertram, daughter. 

Mr. & Mrs. John Bradford 
Werner, daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Ralph 
Scott, son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm 
Bradley Hart, son. 

Mr. & Mrs. Harold Charles 
Mabie, son 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael Anthony 
Hard, scm. 

Mr. & Mrs. George Howard 
Huffman, son. 

Mr. & Mrs. Freddie AUen 
Casey, daughter. 

Mr. & Mrs. Aloyslos Bemfcrd 
Edner, Jr., son. 

Mr. 8. Mrs. Ellgha McCoy 
Jones, Jr., son. 

Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Steven 
Crawford, son. 

Mr. It Mrs. Melvin Luther 
Gill, daughter. 

Mr. Ii Mrs. James Robert 
Miller, son. 

Mr. & Mrs. Frederick Wayne 
Smith, daughter. 

Mr. & Mrs. Doris Deverne 
Cicary, daughter. 

Mr. « Mrs. Gary Dean 
Sheets, s«i. 

Mr. Ii Mrs. Thomas Arrtrew 
Mtals, son. 

Mr. & Mrs. David Christian, 
daughter. 

Mr. Ii Mrs. Jamea Lawrence 
Morrlssey, daughter. 

Mr. d Mrs. Paul Augostlnt 



Mr. & Mrs. George Raymond 
Ernst, son. 

ffiT. & Mrs. John Franklin 
Link III, son. -*,«» 

Mr."^*. Mrs. Charles Ray 
Wrenn, daughter. 

Mr. & Mrs. Curtis Maddin, 
son. 

Mr. & Mrs. Martin G.J. 
Kennedy, daughter. 

Mr. & Mrs. Allan Clement 
Richardson, son. 

Mr* .»Mrs. Howard Lee 
Whitfield) son. 

Mr. & Mrs. Joshua Bertram 
Harrell, Jr., son. 

Hit. & Mrs. Floyd Paul 
Wilson, Jr., daughter. 

Mr. * Mrs. David Arthur 
Myers, son. 

Mr. & Mrs. Randolph Nelson 
Harrison, Jr., son. 

Mr. & Mrs. Issac Lee 
Holloway, daughter. 

Mr. & Mrs. Gill Allen 
Gouldthread, daughter. 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael James 
Fouts, daughter. 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Shay 
Ware, Jr., son. 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Orin 
Holmes, daughter. 

tAr. & Mrs, Perry Leslie 
Barh^t, Jr., son. 

Mr. & Mrs. Vardell Smith, 
son. 

Mr, & Mrs. Richard Lee 
Sprong, daughter. 

Mr. Ii Mrs. Thomas Charles 
Wulchak, daughter. 

Mr. & Mrs. Randolph 
Lelghton Chelborg, daiwhtar. 

Mr. Ii Mrs. Paul Edward 
Miles, daughter. 

Mr. Ii Mrs William H«»ry 
Lewis, son. 

Mr. Ii Mrs. William Edgar 
Gardner, won. 

Mr. Ii Mrs. Alfred Cornelius 
HenMrsen, Jr.. son. 

Mr. & Mr». Jeka Martki 

Wfl. I 



NOTICE . 

This is fo notify the public 
that the undersigned, trading 
as Blue Pete's Back Bay 
Marina will within ten days 
after publication of this 
notice apply to the Virginia 
State Alcoholic Beverage 
Control Board for a license to 
sell Beer for off premises 
consumption. 
Ben F. Forehand 
TA Blue Pete's Back Bay 
Marina 

1365 N. Muddy Creek Rd. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 
Diane T. Morris 
WITNESS 

May 15-1 T 



ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 13th 
day of May, 1974. 
Dianne Hancock Tompkins, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Samuel Bailey Tompkins, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from ^ said 
defendant upon the grounds 
of more than two years 
continuous separation. And 
an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the 
.defendant is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia, ttie last 
known post office address 
being: 1505 Old Kings Road, 
Holly Hill, Florida, if is or- 
dered that he do appear here 
within ten (10) days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
wtvat may be necessary to 
protect his interest In this 
suit. 

A cc^y— Teste: 
John V. FentreMi, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk. 

Stuart R. Hays 
4310 E. Imlian River Road 
Chesapeake, Virginia 

May l$ja,»— J— e »,4t. 

ORDER OF 
PUSLICATION 

Commonwealth of VInjinia, 
In tt»e Clerk's Office of tt« 
Circuit Court rt the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the lOth 
day of May, W4. 
Suzanne M. Schroeder, 
Plaintiff, 

agalrat 
Harry William Schroeder, 
Jr., 



' Tlw oWect of II* wW * to 
•Mi^a m i a r tm a whm at 



fhoro, or should one year 
have elapsed prior to the 
Court receiving a decree 
herein for entry that she be 
granted a divorce a vinculo 
malrinonnii from the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
of desert ion .'And an affidavit 
ttaving t>een made and filed 
that the defendant is a non- 
resident of the Slate of 
VirginiOi the last known post 
office address being: 15 
Schroeder Lane, Patchoque, 
New York, It is ordered that 
he do appear here within ten 
<10) days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what nr>ay be necessary to 
protect his interest in this 
suit. 

A copy— Teste: John V. 
Fentress 

By: J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk, 

Gay 6: Milius, Jr. 
524 Independence Boulevard 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
May l5.Ja.J»— June $— 4t. 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH 

The following abatKloned 
vehicles were removed from 
the streets of the City of 
Virginia Beach: 

IWO, Green, 4 door sedan, 
Oldsmobile, Identification 
number 407M38654. 1973 Ohio 
License, number N1874S. 

1965, blue, 2 door Hard Top, 
Mercury Comet, f(ftTr^i.i?> 
lification number 
5H23C542967. 

1957, Brown Ford Falcon 
Van, 1973 New Hampshire 
license NE 238. 

1959, green, Volkswagon 
Van, Identification number 
461390, 1972 Virginia license 
CEB-257. 

1964, black Plymouth 
Belvedere, Identification 
number 3641225968. 

1965, Maroon English Ford 
Cortina 2 door Hard Top, 
Identification number 
BA92HB77394, 1974 June 
Virginia License BVP-881. 

1966, green Rambler, 2 
door sedan, Identification 
number AGK097F 137064. 

These vehicles have been 
removed to Wilson's Auto 
Service, 635 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia 23451. The owner or 
any person having security 
interest may claim this 
vehicle within three (3) 
weeks of the date of this 
notice by paying all towing, 
preservation, and storage 
charges. Failure by the 
owner or persons having 
security interest to exercise 
their right to- reclaim the 
vehicle within the time 
provided shall be deemed a 
waiver and shall be con- 
strued as consent to the sale 
of the abandoned motor 
vehicle at a public auction. 
W.W. Davis, Colonel 
Chief of Police 
H.C. Terry, Captain 
Commanding Officer 
Traffic Bureau 
May IS— 1 1. 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC 
HEARING ON AN 

Application to the U.S. 
Department of Tran- 
sportation for the 
Acquisition, Consolidation, 
R ehabi I itation, and 
Expansion of the Public 
Transportation System in the 
Tidewater Transportation 
District, Composed of the 
Cities of Chesapeake, Nor- 
folk, Portsmouth, and 
Virginia Beach. ♦ 

I. Notice is hereby given 
that beginning on June 10, 
1974, the Tidewater Tran 
sportation District Com- 
mission will hold a series of 
public hearings on an ap- 
plication to the Urban Mass 
Transportation Administ- 
ration of the U.S. Depart 
ment of Transportation for 
the acquisition, consoli- 
dation, rehabilitation, and 
expansion of public tran- 
sporation in the Tidewater 
Transportation District in 
accordance with the 
following schedule: ' 

MONDAY, JUNE 10 — 7:00 
P.M. in the City Council 
Chambers, Municipal 
Building, Portsmouth, 
Virginia 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19 — 
7:30 P.M. in the AAartin 
Room, Kirn Memorial 
Library, 301 E. City Hall 
Ave., Norfolk, Va. 
MONDAY, JUNE 24 — 2:00 
P.M. in the City Council 
Chambers, Administration 
BIdg., Princess Anne 
Courthouse, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia 

TUESDAY, JUNE 25 — 7:30 
P.M. in the City Council 
Chambers, Administration 
BIdg., Civic Center, 
Chesapeake, Va. 

The purpose of the public 
hearings is to solicit citizen 
views on a project for which 
~ financial assistance is being 
sought from the Urban AAass 
Transportation Administ- 
ration pursuant to ttie Urban 
Mass Transportation Act of 
1964, as amended, generally 
described as follows: 

A. The Tidewater Tran- 
sportation Commission 
proposes to purchase the 
f^^MJng facilities and 
e^i^ent: , .« 

1. The acqulsllTon of 
Community Motor Bus 
Company assets including 
real estate, buses, fare 
collection equipment, service 
vehicles, and shop, garage, 
and office equipment. 

2. Acquislfion of South 
Norfolk T»(cgiJ Company 
assets includin^i ptirchase of 
five buses and parts. 

3. The purchase of ten 
buses from Carolina Coach 
Compwiy. 

4. Rehabilitation and 
improvement of the bus 
maintenance and operations 
facilities In the Cities of 
Portsmouth and Norfolk. 

5. The purchase of 75 new 
buses to replace ot>solcte 
ones. 

6. Ttie purchase of ad- 
ditional new btses to expand 
service into areas not 
presently served. 

7. Purchase and in- 
stallation of new fare hand- 
ling equipment. 

8. Purchase and in- 
stallation of forty bus rMo' 
shelters and SOO bus sti^ 
signs. 

9. Purchase of service 
vehicles, and required an- 
cillary equipment such m 
two-way radios. 

This project provkWs for 
acquisition (^ itic openting 
assets 1^ tt»e Community 
Motor Bw Con^wny, the 
South NM-folk Transit 
Con^any, and the purctiMC 
of ten buses from Carolina 
Coach Company, which 
optraM I 



Cities of Chesapeake, Nor 
folk, Portsmouth, and 
Virginia Beach. Purchase of 
real estate located in the City 
of Portsmouth is included. 
The estimated cost of this 
project is S8,900,000. The 
Federal grant requested is 
estimated to be $7,120,000, or 
80 per cent of the project 
cost. Required matching 
funds will consist of State of 
Virginia funds in the amount 
of $1,513,000 and local 
government funds In the 
amount of $267,000, to tie 
allocated among the Cities in 
accordance with a formula to 
be adopted. 

B. RELOCATION 

No relocation of families, 
individuals, business con- 
cerns or non-profit 
organizations will be 
required as a result of this 
project. 

C. ENVIRONMENTAL 
IMPACT 

No adverse environmental 
effects are anticipated to 
result from the im- 
plementation of this project. 
The new vehicles will comply 
with the air pollution 
reduction criteria currently 
established by the 
Environmental Protection 
AgefKy. 

D. COMPREHENSIVE 
PLANNING 

This project is in con- 
formance with the com- 
prehensive land use and 
transportation planning and 
the short range transit 
development program for 
this area. The project is 
undergoing Section 204 and 
A95 review as required by the 
Demonstration Cities and the 
Metropolitan Development 
Act of 1966 and the 
Intergovernmental fooper 
ation Act of 1968. 

E. ELDERLY AND 
HANDICAPPED 

Consideration will be given 
to the special needs of the 
elderly and the handicapped 
in implementing the project. 
New buses purchased will be 
equipped with special hand- 
rails designed and placed to 
assist the elderly and hand- 
icapped in boarding and 
leaving the buses. Bus 
shelters will afford protec 
tion from the weather while 
waiting for buses. 

II. At the hearing, the 
Tidewater Transportation 
Commission will afford an 
opportunity for interested 
persons or agencies to be 
heard with respect to the 
social, economic, and en- 
vironmental aspects of the 
project. Interested persons 
may. submit orally or in 
writing evidence and 
recommendations with 
respect to said project. 

III. A copy of the preliminary 
application for a Federal 
grant for the proposed 
project, together with an 
environmental analysis and 
the short range transit 
development plan for the 
area is currently available 
for public inspection between 
the hours of 9:00 A.M. and 
4:30 P.M., A^nday through 
Frfday, inclusive except 
holidays, at the: 

Tidewater Transportation 

Commission 

No. 18 Koger Executive 

Center, Suite 232 

Norfolk, Virginia 23502 

Reference Desk 

Business and Technology 

Department 

Kirn Memorial Library 

301 East City Hall Avenue 

Norfolk, Virginia 2350Y 

City Clerk's Office 
Administrative Building 
Civic Center 
Chesapeake, Virginia 23320 

City Clerk's Office 

4th Floor, Municipal Building 

Portsmouth, Virginia 23705 

Offices of the City Manager 
and City Clerk 
Administration Building 
Princess Anne Courthouse 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
23456 

By: James C. Echols 
Executive Director 

5-15,22-2T 



VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 
OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH ON THE 
9TH DAY OF MAY, 1974 
In the AAafter of: 
Estate of Cornelius D. Scully, 
Deceased 

COURT PAPERS NO. 
1*71 

SHOWCAUSe 
ORDER 

It appearing that a report 
of the accounts of United 
Virginia Bank-Seaboard 
National, Executor of the 
Estate of Cornelius D. Scully, 
deceased, and of the debts 
and demands against his 
estate has been filed in the 
Clerk's Office of this Court, 
and that six (6) months have 
elapsed since the 
qualification of the said 
Executor, on motion of the 
Executor, by counsel, it is 
ORDERED that the 
creditors of, and all others 
interested in, the Estate do 
show cause. If any they can, 
on the fifth day of June, 1974, 
before the Judge of this Court 
at 9:00 a.m., against the 
payment and delivery of the 
Estate of Cornelius D. Scully, 
deceased, to the distributees 
without rehiring refunding 
bonds. 

It is further ORDERED 
that this O-der, prior to the 
date above set for hearing, be 
published once a week for 
two successive weeks in The 
Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper published and 
having general circulation 
the City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

I ask Hur this: 

Robert H. Powell 

Of Counsel for Executor of 

the 

Estate of Cornelius D. Scully, 

deceased 



5 15,22,rr 



r^Htor route pubMc 

'MlMSWflCM Ml ^ 



VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 
OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH ON THE 
9th DAY OF MAY, 1974. 

RE: ESTATE OF SPENCER 
L. LOTT, DECEASED 

C.P. MO. 1979 

SmMVCAinB 
ORMR 



It appearing that a report 
of the accounts of First & 
Merchants National Bank, 
Executor of the Estate of 
Spencer L. Lott, Decaned, 
and of the debts and demands 
against the estate have been 
filed m the Clerk's OHIce, 

and that six months have 
elapsed since the qualifica 
tion, on motion of the 
personal representative, it 

is ORDERED that the 
creditors of, and all others 
interested in, the estate show 
cause; if any of them can, on 
the 24 day of MAY, 1974, 
before this Court, In Its 
Courtroom, against the 
payment and delivery of 
estate lo the legatees without 
requiring refunding bonds. 

We ask for this: 
Edward T. Caion III, 
Aitorney for First 8, Mer 
chantsi National Bank, 
Executor of the Estate of 
Spencer L. Lott 

By- J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

5 15,22,21 

VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CLERK'S OF 
FICE OF THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH, ON THE 
8lh DAY OF MAY, 1974, 

IN CHANCERY 
NO. C-74-$l3 

In re: Adoption of Kelly Anne 

Higgins and Kimberly Anne 

Higgins 

By: Joseph Charley Colletti 

8i Rose Arlene Colletti, 

Petitioners 

To: Martin J. Higgins, Jr. 

3000 Nottingham Road 

Norristown, Pennsylvania 

ORDER 

This day came Joseph 
Charles Colletti and Rose 
Arlene colletti. Petitioners, 
and represented that the 
object of this proceeding Is to 
effect the adoptin of the 
above named infants, Kelly 
Anne Higgins and Kimberly 
Anne Higgins, by Joseph 
Charles Colletti and Rose 
Arlene Colletti; husband and 
wile, and affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
Martin J. Higgins, Jr., a 
natural parent of said 
children, is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: 3000 Nottingham 
Road, Norristown, Penn 
sylvania. 

It is therefore Ordered that 
the said Martin J, Higgins, 
Jr. appear before this Court 
within ten (10) days lifter 
publication of this Order and 
indicate his attitude toward 
•he proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary lo protect his 
interest in this mattlr. 

Joh^ V. Fentress, Clerk 
J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

R. Larry Lamtiert, p.q. 
992 First Colonial Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

5 15, 22, 29, 6-5, 4T 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 

In the Clerk,s Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on the 10th 
day of May, 1974. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

William C. Drier, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Geneva Maxine Drier, 

Defendant, 

The object of this suit is fo 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
of Title 20-91 (9) of the Code 
of Virginia. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is a non-resident of 
the Slate of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: Route 11, Sanford, 
North Carolina. 

it is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk ' 
J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk 

Decker, Zoby, Colllas & 

Christie 

900 Plaza One 

Norfolk, Virginia 

5 15, 22, 29, 6-5, 4T 

VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CLERK'S OF 
FICE OF THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH, ON THE 
7tM DAY OF AAAY, 1974. 

IN CHANCERY 
NO. C-74-56* 

In re: Adoption of Kenneth 

Lee Caton 

BY: Fred John Passamonte 

and Sue Stone Passamonte, 

Petitioners 

TO: Daniel David Caton 

427 Maycox Avenue 

Norfolk, Virginia 

ORDER 

This day came Fred J,ohn 
Passamonte and Sue Stone 
Passamonte, Petitioners, 
and represented that the 
object of this prcK:eedlng Is to 
eHect the adoption of the 
above named infant, Kenneth 
bee Caton, by Fred John 
Passamonte and Sue Stone 
Passamonte, husband and 
wife, and affidavit having 
been made and filed ft»at 
Daniel David Caton, a 
natural parent of said child. 
Is a non resident of the State 
of Virginia, and that due 
diligence has been by or In 
behalf of the petitioners fo 
ascertain in vifhich county or 
corporation the natural 
parent is without effect, ttie 
last known post office, ad- 
dress being: 427 Maycox 
Avenue, Norfolk, Virginia, 

1 1 is therefore Ordered that 
the said Daniel David Caton \ 
appear before this Court 
within ten (10) days after 
publication of this Order 
Mid indicate his attitude to- 
ward the proposed adoption, 
or otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this matter. 

joHn V. Fenfr^, Clwk 
J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

W. Leigh Ansell, p.q. 

43M Virginia Beach, 

Boulewd 

Virginia Beach, Virgmia 

4 S-U.22.29,«4,4T 



VIRGINIA: 

IN THE JUVENILE AND 
DOMESTIC RELATIONS 
DISTRICT COURT OF THE 
CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH 

MARY SUSAN DOZIER, 

Complainant 

vs. 

DAVID EDWARD tXJZIER, 

Defendant 

ORDER 



The object of the proposed 
hearing in the above styled 
matter is to have the court 
enter a judgment for the 
arrearage of child support 
and alimony heretofore 
ordered to be paid by him by 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of yirginia Beach, Virginia, 
by decree entered on July 12, 
1972, 

And, it appearing by at 
f idavii filed according to law 
that the last known post 
office address of David 
Edward Ooiier, defendant. Is 
CO Rosemary D, Wright, 4211 
Apt. D, Flowerfield Road, 
Norfolk, Virginia 23518, and 
that due diligence has been 
used by and on behalf of the 
complainant to ascertain 
what county or corporation 
the defendant is, without 
effect, it is therefore OR 
DERED that the said David 
Edward Dozier do appear 
before this court at 9:00 a.m. 
on Thursday, June 20, 1974, 
and do what Is necessary lo 
protect his interest. 

It is further ORDERED 
thai this order be published 
once a week for four sue 
cessive weeks in a 
newspaper published In the 
City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 

ENTER: May 9, 1974 

Frederick P. Autamp 
Judge, Juvenile and 
Domestic Relations District 
Court of the City of Virginia, 
Beach, Virginia 

Elizabeth E. Henley, Clerk 

t 

5 15, 22, 29, 6 5, 4T 



PUBLIC AUCTION 
AUTOMOBILES* 

TRUCKS 

MOTORCYCLES 

INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT 

USED AND SURPLUS 

The City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, will receive bids at 
public auction for 90 units 
used automobiles, trucks, 
motorcycles, and Industrial 
equipment of various years 
of manufacturer and makes 
on the grounds of the City 
Garage located on Lee Roy 
Drive off Seaboard Road 
near Princess Anne Court 
house at 11:00 A.M. on 
Saturday, May 18, 1974. 
Interested persons may view 
the units during normal 
working hours Monday 
through Friday on the 
grounds of the City Garage, 
and at the same time, will be 
given a detailed listing as to 
registered identification for 
ihe units. The City reserves 
the righi to establish 
minimum low bids ac- 
ceptable for units, and to 
reject any and all bids. 
Successful bidders must be 
prepared to pay for each unit 
at the closing of each sale to 
receive title transfer. 
Employees of the City of 
Virginia Beach and members 
of their immediate families 
are not eligible to bid. 



E. Johnson, Auc 



The Sun-Wednesday. May 15. 1974-Paqa B-5 



Reeves 

tioneer 

Carroll G. Clough, 

chasing Agent 



Pur- 



5-15, IT 



NOTICE 

Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the 
Councilof the City of Virginia 
Beach will be held in the 
Council Chamtiers of the 
Administration Building, 
City Hall, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, on Monday, May 20, 
1974, at 2:00 9M. at which 
lime the following ap 
plications will be heard: 



CHANGE 

DISTRICT 

TION: 



OF ZONING 
CLASSIFICA 



KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH 

1. Petition of Fred D. and 
Hattie G. Holloway for a 

CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICA 
TION from R 5 

Residential District to D 1 
Office District on certain 
property Ijeginning at a point 
650 feel more or Jess West of 
Edwin Drive, running a 
distance of 100 feet along Ihe 
South side of Holland Road, 
running a distance of 226.89 
feet along the Eastern 
property line, running a 
distance of 100.97 feet along 
the Southern property line 
and running a distance of 
212.92 feet along the Western 
property line. Said parcel is 
known as Lot B,Subdivlslon 
of Tract 43, A.W. Cornick and 
contains 0.5 acre more or 
less. (Holland Terrace- 
Larkspur Areas). KEMP 
SVILLE BOROUGH. 

2. PetltkKi of Robert and 
Mary Reid for a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT, 
CLASSIFICATION from R 5 
Residential District to O 1 
Office District on cei;fain 
property beginning at a point 
750 feet more or less West of 
Edwin Drive, running a 
distance of 100 feet along the 
South side of Holland Road, 
running a distance of 212.92 
feel along the Eastern 
properly line, running a 
distance of 100.97 feet along 
the Southern property line 
and running a distance of 
19«,96 feet along the Western 
property line. Said parcel is 
known as Lot C, Subdivision 
of Tract 43, A.W. Comtek and 
cwiiains 0.5 acre more or 
less. (Holland Terrace 
Larkspur Areas). KEMP- 
SVILLE BOROUGH. 

3. Petition <^ Roy A. and 
Elvin D. Reid for a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R 5 
Residential District to O-l 
OHiee District on certain 
property beginning at a point 
HO feet more or less West of 
Edwin Drive, running a 
distance of 100 feet along tl» 
South side of Holland Road, 
rwwlng a distance of Ht.9* 
feet along the Eastern 
property line, running a 
dlslai^ of 1«.f7 fMt along 
me Soutliim eroperty line 
•nd nini*tg a dtetance of W 



feet along the Western 
property line. Said parcel is 
known as Lot D, SMbdivlslon 
of Tract 43, A.W, Cornick and 
contains 0.45 acre more or 
less. (Holland Terrace 
Larkspur Areas). KEMP 
SVILLE BOROUGH. 

4. Petition of Cornell and 
Casandra Freeman for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICA 
TION from R5 Residential 
District to 1 Office District 
on certain property begin 
ning at a point 950 leei more 
or lesi West 01 Edwin Drive, 
running a distance of 110 feet 
along the Southsideof Holland^ 
Road, running a distance of 
185 feel along the Eastern 
property line, running a 
distance of 111.07 feet along 
the Southern property line 
and running a distance of 
169.65 feet long the Western 
property lin*. Said parcel Is 
known as Lot E, Subdivision 
01 Tract 43, A.W. Cornick and 
contains 0.45 acre. (Holland 
Terrace Larkspur Areas). 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

5. Petition ot ntibtr\ and 
Mildred O, Perry lor • 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICA- 
TION from R5 Residential 
District to 1 Office District 
on certain property begin- 
ning at a point 1060 feet more 
or less West of Edwin Drive, 
running a distance of 117 feet 
along Ihe South side of 
Holland Road, running a 
distance of 169,65 feet along 
Ihe Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 117.71 
leet along the Southern 
property line and running a 
distance nf 162.8 leet along 
Ihe Western property line. 
Said parcel is known as Lot 

F, Subdivision of Tract 43, 
A.W. Cornick and contains 
0.45 acre more or less. 
(Holland Terrace-Larkspur 
Areas). KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

6. Petition of, Clarence L. 
and Elaine B. Waike for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICA 
TION from R 5 Resldantlal 
District to 0-1 Office District 
HI certain property begin' 
ning at a point 1177 feet more 
or less West of Edwin Drive, 
running a distance of 130 feel 
along the South side of 
Holland Road, running a 
distance of 162.8 feet along 
Ihe Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 130.16 
leet along the Southern 
property line and running a 
ciisfanc* of 168.91 feet along 
the Western properly line. 
Said parcel is known as Lot 

G, Subdivision of Tract 43, 
A.W. Cornick and contains 
0.45 acre, (Holland Terrace- 
Larkspur Areas). KEMP- 
SVILLE BOROUGH. 

7. Pet I tion of Metro Center 
Associates (or a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B3 
Community Business 
District to 0-1 Office District 
on certain property located 
in the Southwest quadrant of 
the Intersection of Cen- 
terville 'Turnpike and Indian 
River Road, running a 
distance ot 483.66 feet along 
the South side of Indian River 
Road, running a distance of 
190.54 feel along the West 

sideof Centerville Turnpike, 
running a distance ot H/,/v 
leet along the Southern 
property line and running a 
distance of 271. 88 leet along 
the Western property tine. 
Said parcel contains 3.731 
acres. Plats with more 
detailed information aro 
available in the Department 
of Planning. (College Park- 
Level Green Areas). 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 
8. Petition of Metro 
Center Associates for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICA. 
TION from H-1 Hotel District 
to 0-1 Office District on 
certain properly located In 
Ihe Southwest quadrant of 
the Intersection of Cen- 
lerville Turnpike and Indian 
River Road beginning at a 
point 190.54 feet South of 
Indian River Road and 
running a distance of 950 leet 
more or less along fhe North 
side of Centerville Turnpike, 
running a distance of 500 feel 
along 'he Western property 
line, running a distance of 4S0 
leet more or less along the 
Northern property , and 
running a distance of 567.71 
fee* along the Eastern 
property line. Said parcol 
contains 9.9 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information 
are available in Ihe 
Department of Planning. 
(College Park Level Green 
Areas). KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

9. Petition of Metro Center 
Associates for a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B-2 
Community Business 
District to 0-1 Office Dlstrld 
on certain property located 
in the Southwest quadrant of 
Ihe intersection of Cen- 
terville Turnpike and Indian 
River RoadJaeginning at a 
point 1140 feel West of Indian 
River Road and running a 
distance ot 565 feet more or 
less along the North side of 
Centerville Turnpike, run- 
ning a distance of 750 feet 
trtWre or less along^^^he 
Northern property line and 
running a distance of SOO feet 
more or less along the 
Western property line. Said 
parcel is irisi^ular In shapa 
and contains 2.5 acres. Plats 
with more detailed in- 
lormatkMi art avallablo In 
•he Department of Planning. 
(College Park Le^il^oen 
Areas). KEMP^'^W.e 
BOROUGH. 

10. Peltltlon of Metro 
Center Associates for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICA- 
TION from 1-1 Light 
Industrial District to B3 
Community Business 
District on certain pr^wrty 
located in the Souffieast 
quadrant of the intersKthm 
of Centerville Turnpike mmI 
Indian River Road beginning 
at a point 190 feet more or 
less South of Indian River 
Road, running a distann of 
2443 feet atong Ihe South and 
East sides ot Centerville 
Turnpike, running a distance 
of l3t9.XI feet along the 
Southern property line and 
running a distance of IMt.ti 
feet along the Eastern 
prcyerty line. Said pwcM It 
triangular in shape and 
cwiiains 36.780 acres. Plats 
with more detailed in- 
formation we available In 
the Departmwit of PlwinMig. 
(College Park Level Gnan 
Areas). KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH, 

VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH 

11. P^ltlon Of A. Gordon 
SKpMnaen and EllzMMNt •• 
SHts by Qrvmr C. Wr^t, 

*HnnMV,««- a rMAMOa f^ 



^^ 



■■ 



■■■■■■■ttfl 



^■■■MMaiaaiaMHMi 



mmmmmmm 



mmmmmmmmmmimmm'mmmmm 



Classified 



\Ki3. 



[ 



Liais 



ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R 6 
Residenilal District to A-4 
Apartment District on 
ceftain property located on 
•lie Northwest corner of 
Hilltop Road (Linkhorn 
Drive) and Pacific Avenue, 
running a distance of 412.41 
feet along the West side of 
Pacitic Avenue, running a 
distance of 411.93 feet along 
the North side of Hilltop 
Ri'ad (Linkhorn Drive) 
running a distance of 185.66 
leet along the Western 
property line and running a 
distance of 173.11 feet along 
the Northern property line 
Said parcel contains 70,316 
square feet. (Princess Anne 
Country Club Area). 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 
Richard Webbon 
City Clerk 
^_ SB, 15, 2 T 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City ot 
Virginia Beach, on the 30th 
day of April, }7N. 
Douglas c. Smart, Plaintiff, 
against 

AAarie D. Smart, Defendant. 

ORDER OF 

PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa Ei 
Thoro to be later merged into 
a divorce A Vinculo 
AAatrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
01 desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident "I 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: 1434 WcKean Stree', 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
1914S. 
II is ordered that she do 

appear here within ten (10) 

days after due publication 

hereof, and do what may be 

necessary to protect her 

inleres" in this suit. 

A copy— Teste: 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 

CLERK 

By Sandra Hargrove D 

Clerk. 

Brydges, Hammers & 

Hudgins 

1349 Laskin Rd. 

Virginia Beach, Va. 

5-8,15, 22, 29, 4 T 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City o( 
Virginia Beach, on the 30th 
day ol April, 1974. 
Daniel Raymond Sabine, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Nancy Carolyn Holt Sabine, 
Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
ot constructive desertion or 
two years separation without 
cohabitation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that due 
diligence has been used by 
and on behalf of the plaintiff 
to ascertain in what county 
or corporation the defendant 
is, without effect, the last 
known post office address 
being: 149 Waverly Drive, 
Virginia Beach, Va. 

I' is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10 
day; after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 
A copy— Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS: 
CLERK 

By: Sandra Hargrove D. 
Clerk. 

Goldblati, Lipkin, Cohen, als 
Plaza One 
Norfolk, Va. 23510 

5 8, 15, 22, 29 4 T 



waltham, Massachusetts, 
It is therefore Ordered that 
I the said Williairi Norman 
AAanter appear before this 
Court within ten (10) days 
after publication of this 
Order and indicate hisher 
attitude toward the proposed 
adoption, or otherwise do 
what is necessary to protect 
his interest in this matter. 
A copy teste: 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit D.C. 
Penelope D. Coffman 
4999 Cleveland Street 
Va. Beach, Va. 
5— 1,8,15,22 — 4T 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

In the Clerk's OHIce of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 29th 
day of April, 1974. 
Mary Hughes Webb, 
Plaintiff, 
against 
Don Hughey Webb, Oefen- 

tsMTieoDlecf of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the ^aid 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of desertion continuous for 
ptwo years without in- 
terruption. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: c-o Modine Rollins, 
Rutherfordton, North 
Carolina. 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days aftef due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 
A copy-Teste: John V. 
Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk 

Kelsey 8i Kelsey 
1408 Maritime Tower 
Norfolk, Virginia 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF 
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH, ON THE 11th DAY 
OF April, 1974. 

In Chancery 

No. C-74-280 
In re: Adoption of John 
Douglas Lipps 
By: Michael D. Miller and 
Margaret K. Miller, 
Petitioners 
To: John D. Lipps 
120 Sterling Street 
Norfolk, Virginia 

ORDER 

This day came Michael 
D. Miller and Margaret K. 
Miller, Petitioners, and 
represented that the object 
of this proceeding is to 
effect the adoption of the 
above named Infant, John 
Douglas Lipps, by Michael 
D. Miller and Margaret K. 
Miller, husband and wife, 
and affadvait having been 
made and filed that John D. 
Lipps, a natural parent of 
said child, is a non-resident 
of the State of Virginia, to 
ascertain his whereabouts, 
to no effect: the last known 
post office address being: 
120 Sterling Street, Norfolk 
Virginia. 

It is therefore Ordered 
that the said John D. Lipps 
appear before this Court 
within ten (10) days after 
publication of this Order 
and indicate his attitude 
toward the proposed 
adoption, or otherwise do 
what is necessary to protect 
his interest in this matter. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit D.C. 

Peter G. Decker, Jr. 
900 Plaza One 
Norfolk, Virginia 

4-24,5 1,8,15-4t 



Page B-6-The Sun-WednMday, May 15, 1974 



interest in this suit. 

A copy Teste: John V. 

Fentress, Clerk 

By J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 

Clerk . , . 

Tidewater Legal Aid Society 

700 Duke Street 
Norfolk, Virginia 

4-24 — 5-1, e, 15- 4T 



486-S4K> 



1 SUNSHINE AOS 



TERRY — Hurry back, we 
miss you much! Party time 
is coming. 



ISUNSHMEAM 



LEROY — Vim are 4V> fish 
behind in yoor payment thh 
Joyce. 



SLortA Found 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court ot the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 3rd 
day 01 May, 1974. 
Harry R. Harrelson, 
Plaintifi, 
against 

Edna Thomas Harrelson, 
Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A vinculo 
AAatrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the ground<^ 
of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is noi a resident of 
•he Slate ol Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
t>eing: 53 West 4th Street, 
Jacksonville, Florida. 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereWPand do wtiat may be 
necessary lo protect her 
interest in this suit. 
A copy-Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS: 
CLERK 

By: Sandra Hargrove D 
Clerk. 

Brydges, Hammers & 
: Hudgins 
' 1369 Laskin Rd. 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circiut Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
17th day of April, 1974. 
Marjorie Jane Hollmann 
Fletcher, Plaintiff, 
against 

Tully Mack Fletcher, Jr., 
Defendant. 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

The Object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
of separation uninterrupted 
for more than two years. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is a non- 
resident of the State ol 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
418 North Driver Court, 
Durham, North Carolina. 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk 

Smith, Power, <• Owens 



■ Virginia Beach, Va. ***5i^j^|*'"""^ ^'^"^ 



5 8, 15, 22, 29, 4 T 



ORDER 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH, ON THE 
Mth DAY OF APRIL, 1974. 
In re: Attoption of David 
WayfW AAanter an infant 
wider the age of fourteen 
years to be named David 
Wayne Tripp 

By; Joan Esther Simons 
Tripp and Robert Lloyd 
Tripp Petifiwws 
To: William Norman AAanter 
Watttiam, Massachusetts 

TWs day came Joan Esther 
SInmv Tripp and Robert 
Ltoyd Tripp, Petitioners, and 
repre (anted Wiat tt»e object of 
this pr o cawM ii g is to effect 
Me adoption of tlie abwe 
iMnwd Mant (s), Ctevid 
Wayne Atanter. by Joan 
amer SImMS Tripp ami 
lUbtn Lloyd Triiip, hu^>and 
and wife, aiM affidavit 
^mtns feaan maM Md filed 
mt JOM EsMHr SimoiB 
Tt(*p, a naiwwl parani of 
■Md ^M<ran}, K^ • non 
n^tmi at ttia mif of 
Vk^^iia, IM mt mmm pmi 
oHlea addrwi kaing: 



folk, Virginia 

4 24,5-1,8,15 4t 

Commonwealth ol Virginia, 
In the Clerk'' Office ot the 
Circuit Court ot the City ot 
Virginia Beach, on ttie 22nd 
day ol April, 1974. 
Wanda Fayc Bicsinq Lynch, 
Plaintitt, 
agains) 

Paul Lvnch, Detendani 
ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 



The object ot this null is iq 
obtain an absolute divorce 
from ttK? said defendant upon 
•he grounds ot two year 
separation, 

And an affidavit having 
l^een made and tiled itiai due 
diligence has been used by or 
in b^twH ot the complainant 
•o ascertain in which county 
or corporation the detendani 
is, wittwut effect, the last 
known post otiice addres", 
t?eing 3306 Salient ine 
Boulevard, Norfolk, 
Virginia. 

M K ordered that ht do 
appear here within 'en (10) 
day atier due publication 
tiereot. and do what may be 
necessai^ to protect hir 



RATES: All classified 
advertising (businesses 
and individuals) only 25 
cents per line of type, with 
a minimum charge of $2. 
Classified display $2.52 
per column inch, wItK a 
minimum charge of $5.04 
except on contract basis. 

DEADLINE for classified 
display is Noon Monday 
prior to Wednesday 
publication. In column 
classifieds accepted until 5 
p.m. Monday prior to 
Wednesday publication. 

Place ads at the SUN 
office 138 S. Rosemont Rd., 
Va. Beach, Va. 23452, or 
mail to Classified Desk; or 
phone 486-3430. Classifieds 
are priced on cash basis; 
payment is due upon 
receipt of statement. 



STAN - 
possible. 



Nothing is im- 



J.M. — She's a-grinnin' and 
a-growlin', too? What's op? 
D.M. 



JESSE — Welcome 
Sun. Get them 
honeylMI! 



to 



the 
ads 



DIANE — For the BIGGEST 
Blue Fish- My Queen- Next 
week the King will try! Love 
you, Tom 



MAMA — So glad you're 
home again. Don't you go 
streaking around the trailer 
loo much with that walker! 
Daddy — take good care of 
her. We love you very much. 
Diane, Sondra, Archie <8i 
kids. 



TOM — Going fishing with 
you is a lot of fun, but cat- 
ching a big Blue is the most 
fun of all! I Love You. Diane. 



ANN — How did yoo manage 
to run into a door and get that 
mark on your neck? 



LOST - IRISH SETTER 5 
tnonths old, AAale, L9 tat- 
tooed inside Mt ear. Rudee 
inlet wea/ 42S-S933, I55^M20. 
REWARD. 



H AmoMobflas Vm S4b 

CADILLAC — 1971, 4-dOOr 
DeVllle, good shape. $2800. 
488-8815. 



JOYCE - My eternal thanks 
to you, may you sew only 
beautiful things on your nl^ 
sewing machine. Diane. 



CHRYSLER - New 

Yorker, 1970. 4 dr. hardtop. 

Excel, cand. $1495. Davis 

Bet you're the only Mom £'»^"_^'^Motors^497-8100. 

being wished Happy AAothers 

Day. Backwards Patsy, P.S. 

Dad, this is worse than 



forgetting lo mail your card. 



^kcjoctnd 






^eeetkm 




DIAL-486-3430 



SAY 
!!lll 



IT 
!! 



ISN'T SO ETHEL 



BILL — Our feel hurti Glad 
to help our favorite bar- 
fender and Cupid anytime... 
well, almost anytime! Your 
assistant bartender add 
waitress. 

JOE —Saturday night is 
OUR dancing night. Come on 
weekend and 24th. Yea, we 
could! Yea, I do! Fuzzy. 

PAM — Did you have 
collision insurance. Hope you 
didn't hurt the motorcycle. 
Mommy. 



WJNOUNCEMENTS 
3 Speciil Sctvicei 



DATSUN — 1973 240Z; 
Brown w-tan interior, auto, 
transmission, air cond., AM- 
FM Stereo 8 track tape 
player. 6000 miles. 484-3164. 

DObGE POLARA — 9 
passenger station wagon, 
1967. Good condition. $595. 
464-1902, 464-2434. 



l^MoTO^t^o^n^ 

H9NOA — 1974, 125, like 
n«w, less than 500 miles. S600. 
340-0045 or 340 1262. 



NORTON — 1973 WQ Com 
mando, excellent condition, 
mileage 1500, 499-3419. 

MOTORCYCLES — Hondas. 
1974, His «, Hers, XL 75, XL 
100. 1 month old. Under 250 
miles each. $800 8< $575. 428- 
1125. 



2i Boate, Marine Su ppliet 

AUTHORIZED 

T-CRAFT DEALER 
JACK THORNTON 

MOBILE HOMES 

m: 85S-2510 

FoAT— lTwnbarFoamT255 
h.p.-Mercrulser command 
bridge, fully equippM In- 
cluding CB-VHF radio's and 
many extras. Call Miss Ruth, 
(804) 460-1166. 

LUGAR — 21'; 110 hp In- 
board-outboard with trailer. 
$1,400. 543 2454. 



T^ACWEH^'^ 



mature, 
responsible, will exchange 
babysitting, housesitting, 
miscellaneous for . summer 
room. References. Box 83,, 
Heathsville^a^^jTS^^^^ 

38 liMfaeM OpportaaMw 

A CHANCE TO 

SUCCEED— develop your 
own business. Call 340-1317 
after 5 PM. 

43A eenaral Inttnictiom 

VOICE LESSONS - 
Beginners, advanced. James 
AAorrinon, 4284)987. 



44MBtk 



61A P«m Im^eanewftl 

STEVENSON 
FORD TRACTOR 
1792 S. Military Hwy. 
420-4220 

62l>bcMa«yftTooii 

JOHNSON TRACTORS 
Nine in Ford 200 Case, 600 
Ford and equipment, two 
bladed Disc Plow. S45-8370. 



63 Bi 



UfldlM 



Matniils 



GRIMES 

MUSIC SCHOOL 

Private IfuticLoKMu in 
'nnbiokeAiea 

S string Banjo-Tanor Banjo- 
Uultar-Electrlc Batt-Hawa- 
llan Oultar-Mandolln. 
Cril After 4 P.M. 4»>.UM 



HOME Builders li Con- 
tractors - Let us hrtp you 
iwith that new home, ad- 
ditions or repairs. We can 
furnish materials from 
basement to attic and aid you 
in financing. Phone 
KELLAM & EATON 427-3200. 



AUTOJUNK 

TOWED 
AWAY FREE 

ANYTIME 
8557488 



AUTO JUNK — Top pay and 
tow away. 587-8841 anytime. 



QUICK CHECK 
CLASSIFIED INDEX 



D 



426-2146 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



] I 



CANDY THE CLOWN 
Birthdays, Promotionais, 
Grand Openings. 587-3697. 

CARPET CLEANING 

Home or Office 

Free Estimates 

Call 464-4971 

JEWEL TEA PRODUCTS 

Available in 
Va. Beach 



7-9:30P.M. 



FORD— 1970 Station Wagon, 
good condition, $700. or will 
trade. 464-3119. 

FORD — 1968 Galaxie 500, 2 
door, white sidewall tires, 
factory air conditioned. $650. 
481-3736. 

FORD LTD- 1968, Best offer 
over $450. 

486 8623. 

JAGUAR — 1971, V-12, 2 plus 
2, everything. $6500. 588-7435. 

JAGUAR — 1972 V-12, 2 plus 
2, loaded. $6,000. Excellent 
condition. 857-5793. 

NOVA — 1972, Chevy, 
automatic transmission, 
power steering and disc, 
brakes. 14,000 miles. 497-3682. 

NOVA — 1970, Straight 
transmission, 3S0-V8. $1500 or 
best offer. 420-2887. 

OLDSMOBILE — 1969 
Cutlass S. Air conditioned, 
good condition. $100 and take 
over payments. 425-5023 after 
5 p.m. 

OLDSMOBILE — 1972, '98. 
Excellent condition. Like 
new. $2800. 424-1175. 

OPEL — 1968, good running 
condition. $700. 499-1308., 

PLYMOUTH — 1963, 4 door, 
new tires, new battery. $350. 
588-2540. 

PLYAAOUTH — 1971 Scamp, 
6 cylinder, standard, new 
paint, new tires. In top 
condition. $1300 firm. Call 
857 4273. 

PONTIAC - 1973 Firebird, 
V8, automatic. Vinyl top. 
AAake offer. 427-1451, after 6. 



MOTOR — 1972 Johnson, 25 
hp, electric start; with 
renDote shift and throttle and 
cables. 482-1564. 

PENN YAN — Tunnel drive, 
23', 1969, fully equipped. 497- 
0174. 

SAILBOAT — Ketch Choey 
Lee, 32' new diesel engine; 
26,000 425-5313 425-1197. 




47Dogi,ati,Othefl^ti 

AIREDALE TERRIERS — 
AKC reg., shots, ready to go. 
$100. cash. 499-7713. 



BEAGLE PUPS — 

Registered, $75. 625-7131, 
please leave message. 

BEAGLE PUPS -' 

Registered, $75. 625-7131, 
please leave message. 



34 Help Wanted 



REAL ESTATE AGENTS- 
6 fult-time, 6 part-time 
agents needed for new 
Virginia Beach office. 
Instant commission 
arrangement, life 
insurance, hospitalization, 
free license preparation, 
and on the job train- 
ing. Call Wayne Jar- 
rett for confidential 
interview. 



420-0940 623-3401 

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY 

BROKER 



REAL ESTATE FOR RENT 



SwMhlmAd*. 



S»«CMSirvlcM 3 

Trtniportation 4 

LMI li Found 5 

CardMTttanlis « 

inMamorlMi j 

Monumtnto-Burld Lot* | 



AUTOMOTIVE 



AutomablKiforSai* n 

Truck*. Trallcn, jMps jj 

Wantad Autonwtivt 12A 

Autoa, Trucks lor hira 13 

AutaParM.RapaIrt )4 

Aut6 Accaas.-Palntlne ■ I4A 

UfllltyTrallan is 

*»-* ISA 

Wantad Trallart isa 

*»otorcyclaa,Seoolar» i« 

Aircraft tor lata, MTlt 17 



Apartmanti-Furniihad 7j 

Apartmanta, Unlu-nltliad 74 

Garagaafor Rant n 

Farms and Land lor Rant 7« 

Movars Storaga 7aA 

ttousas for Rant 77 

FurnlahadHausas 77A 



MERCHANraSE 



RECREATIONAL 



Campart,Trallan li 

RacValilclasMrlilra MA 

Camp, Soans Equip It 

Baach Suppllas M 

Boats, Marina Suppllas It 

BoatslorHira HA 



EMPLOYMENT 



tMlp Wantad 34 

Raaumas. Llstlnat 3S 

Jobs Wantad 3* 



ArtlclasforSala SI 

Afltlquas SIA 

Housahold Goods ,.S> 

Oaraga-Rummaga SIA 

Wantad to Buy S3 

Suvae-Trada SIA 

Mvsictf Marcliandlaa S4 

TV-Radle-Slarao S5 

Elactranlc Egulpnianl ISA 

Colna and Stamps SO 

Jamlry a Watctiaa S7 

WaarlngApparal S7A 

Good Tilings to Eat St 

Farm and Dairy Praducts SM 

Flrawood m 

LawnandOardan IS 

Saada-Ptants-FloiMra MA 

Faadand Fartlltiar ill 

Farm Implamants IIA 

Machlnary and Tools M 

BulldlneMatarlals 13 

Buslnaaa Eoulpmant M 



MOBILE H(»fK 



Mol>llaHomastorSala is 

AtoWloHomai lor Rant UA 

MoWlaHomoMovars ISB 

MolMla Noma Silas 11 

MoMla Nomas Wantad IIA 



SISTER TINA 
Reader and Advisor 

On all problems of Life such 
11 mani^e, butinen, love af- 
fain, courtship, aicoliol, or if 
you're sick or in need of 
help, come see Sistei Tina. 
All readings private and con- 
fidential. Call for appoint- 
ment 

340-2774 
2236 VIRGINIA 
BEACH BLVD. 
CORNER GREAT 
NECKRD. Next 
to Hardee's, London Bridge. 

PRIVATE HOME-Patkii« 
facflitiei. 

UMITEDUME a^QAL 
GROUP READINGS 
WLYSl. PER PERSON 



PONTIAC — 1972 Grand 
Prix, all power, air con- 
ditioned, 427-3325 



RENAULT 

The nation's largest selection ol 
used Renaults Irorr the nation's 
largest Renault., dealer. All 
models, colors and prices. Most 
are one owner cars with our 
famous one year warranty, 

EASTERN AUTO 

933 E. LITTLE CREEK RD. S88 
1334 



RAMBLER — 1959: 6 
cylinder automatic; good 
condition; $250 or best offer; 
4256572 



THUNDERBIRD — 1959 
Classic. Excellent condition. 
Driven daily. $500. 587-2075. 



ENERGY OPPORTUNITY 
Crisis for some brings op- 
portunities for others. Local 
business man with sky 
rocketing growth looking for 
mature married person to 
assist with management 
responsibilities. Work in on a 
part-time basis. Mid-teen 
potential tor first year. By 
appointment only, call 547- 
3907. 

BABYSITTERS , 

Register and earn extra 
money sitting with our 
agency. For info call 489- 
1622. Babysitters Tidewater 

BABYSITTER — "irT'my 
home. 70th. St., Virginia 
Beach. Call 428-3428. 

$2.75 PER HOUR 
Part or full time. Ideal for 
civilian or military. We need 
10 people to work in sales and 
service dept. No experience 
necessary. Call Mrs. Black, 
499-1269. 



REDUCE SAFE & FAST 
with GoBese Tablets & E- 
Vap "water pills" 
Murden's Drug. 

TUTORING AVAILABLE 
Fourth year education 
rrajor wishes lo 'utor 
elementary children in your 
home iir mine. Particular 
inieresi in Special Children 
including learning disabled 
anri mentally retarderi. Call 
Su/anne Hdllandswurfh, 486- 
1514. 

WE HAUL 

OLD CARS AWAY 

6239194. 



VEGA 1971, runs and looks 
qood Must sell. $1495, or 
besi otter. 853 9597. 

VOLKSWAGEN BEETLE — 
1968; good condition, $995. 
340-5137. 

VOLKSWAGEN — 1973 
Beetle; built-in tape deck; 
low mileage; $2650. 340-5137 



LADIES- MEN 

BRANCH MANAGER 
TRAINEES 

Local progressive 
company will train 3 ladies 
for Branch Manager 
positions. Must have neat 
appearance. 



IRISH SETTER ■ 14 month 
old male. Registered. 486 
3255 <ir 340-4622. 

LABRADOR PUPS — reg., 7 
weeks, black. Super Chief 
strain. Dr. Green, days, 627- 
4131, nights Suffolk 539-6515. 

POODLES — Silver 
miniature, 7 weeks, 2 males. 
$50 each. 499 2633. 

PUPPIES 

(4) small adorable females. 
Free to good homes. 116 
London Bridge Rd. 486-8604. 

RABBITS - Adults and 
babies, also cages. 486-6324. 

SIBERIAN HUSKY PUP- 
PIES — 10 weeks old, 
champion sired, shots, 
wormed, 853-9213. 

ST. BERNARD - AKC 
registered. 12 months old. 
Very friendly, 464-1227. 

ST. BERNARD— Female, 11 
weeks; Male, 1 year; AKC 
registered 545-7483. 

YORKSHIRE TERRIERS - 
AKC reg. 7 weeks. Terms 
considered. Shots. 490-0487. 



47A fet-Stud Setvice 

POODLES - Black 
miniatures, AKC 
Registered; Terms. 588-4066. 

51 ArticlegForSrie 

CAMERA — Bronica 52A2-''4 
SLR, used only once, perfect 
■condition, $325. 425-1991. 

GOLF CLUBS — Hague 
uilra. Complete set, bag and 
head covers. 588-2540. 

INSULATION — 3Vs" full 
thick. 4.29 roll. Arco Hard- 
ware, 3365 Military hwy. 853- 
1379. 



64 ■wslwait Iqulpmawt 

^?RTo^UY^^i«?7 
used office ftjmlture. Ex- 
rental desks $49 8i up. New 
damaged files $39 & up. Free 
delivery. 

DESKS, INC. 
3411 High St. 3^^7883 

65Moba e Hornet For Sale 

AMERICAN — 1970, 12 x 40, 1 
bedroom, furnished. $300 
equity and assume balance. 
543-0364. 

HOMETTE — 1964 50 X 10, 
With 4 X 10 expando in living 
room, 2 bedrooms, fully 
furnished. Must see to ap- 
preciate. $1675. 499-4812. 

STYLEMAR - 1972, 65' x 12' 
2 bedrooms, 2 full baths. 
Assume balance. 428-8437. 

li AparHwant»-Furiil»h e<| 

DELUXE 2 Bedroom 
Townhouse, completely 
furnished; dishwasher. Color 
TV and all utilities. At Green 
Run. $295 monthly. 3403747. 

76 A Movw»StocBge 

FURNITURE MOVING — 
Washers, dryers, 
refrigerators, Pianos, Etc. 24 
hours, 7 days a week and 
holidays no extra charge. 
853-ra08. 

WILL MOVE ANYTHING, 
24 hours a day, 7 days a 
week! Don't delay. Call 
today! 588-4715. 



77 Apt. Foi Rent 

PEMBROKE PARK — 3 
bedroom, 2Vj bath 
townhouse. Owner, 420-8525. 

78 Resort Property-Rant 

3 bedroom, 2 bath cottage at 
211-77th St., Va. Beach. $160 
week. Available June 1st, 
June I5ih and last week in 
August. Call Mrs. Futch at 
855-0195 days; weekends 855- 
1263. 



HOUSES a, 
APARTMENTS 
Available on a yearly 
short term basis. 

DUCKS REAL ESTATE 

323 Laskin rd. 

428-4882 



or 



MOUNTAIN LODGE 

For the large family, 
5 bedrooms, 2 fire- 
places, large screened 
porch, deluxe kitch- 
en with modern ap- 
pliances, lake, boat- 
ing, fishing, hiking, 
recreational facili- 
ties for all ages. West 
of Harrisonburg, Va. 
Write Dah Stickley, 
Jr. Penn Laird, Va. 



SIA Antiques 



1 2 Tnickf, TnilMS, Jeeps 



: 



$610 month to start 
Plus bonuses and benefits 

Call49f.27«3 



ANTIQUES, We boy 
anything old; lurnifure, 
glassware, iewelry; 1 piece 
or. entire estate. ZEDD 
AUCTION CO. 622-4182. 



OLD ROLL TOP desks lor 
sale, 8 lo choose Irom. 

DESKS, INC. 
3411 High SI. 399 0979 




CHEVROLET— 1971 pickup, 
^4 Ion, 8' bed, camper 
special, new paint; $1745; 
8556458. 

FORD — 1973 F 100 Pickup 
truck, 8 ft. bed with camper 
shell, 302 engine, straight 
stick. $2,850. 588-2540. 



38 Butineai Oppmtunities 



FMANOAL 



y [ 



BualneasOpoortunmas n 

Wantad to Buy Business 3ia 

Stocks and Bands w 

Loans-Mortgagas « 

Wantaata Borrow 41 



ROOMS-HOICLS 



msTRucnwr 



Corraspandanca Course 42 

Local Instruction Classas 43 

Ganaral Instrucnens 43A 

Music Dane* Dramattcs 44 ' 

Private Instructions as 

Instructions Wanted 4* 



Ipets-uvestockI 



OOBS, Cats, other Pels 4; 

I^Stua Service . 47A 

Moraaa. Cattle, etc 4i 

Poultry a Supplies 40 

WantadLivastock ma 



DIRECTORIES 



Noase MRvica-aB^AiR suidc 

Under Kcat Eatale 



Rooms with Board 47 

Rooms wittiout.Board t» 

Rooms for tttusakacplna «* 

RasortvHoMs 70 

Rattaurants 71 

wantatf-Koema or Board 72 

Rl lui <a>lim*i ty lor Root 71 

Sutmrban far Rent tm 

Out of Tovm for Rant ;ib 

WanladloRent ;» 

For Rantor Sale « 

GroundLaasas ha 

Business Placaa for Rani 11 

Offjcas and DaM Space iiA 

indusIrM lor Rent na 



REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 



^LE j 



Industrial for Sale lie 

Business Praparty Sale n 

invastrtrani Property ha 

Apartments lor Sale tlB 

FarmsLand Timber jj 

Real Estate Notices M 

For S«a Nerlolk is 

For Sale Virginia Baach M 

For Sale Ctiasapaalia (7 

For Sale Portsmouth m 

Condominiums ha 

Suburban for Sale w 

Resort Property for Sale at 

Out of Te«m for Sale n 

luits for Sale M 

Enctiange Real Estate 94 

FerSalaor Exctiange n 

Wanted-Real Estate M 

New t«>mas for Sale n 



•mm 



PLACE A "PERSON TO PERSON" AD 
IN ANV OF THE ABOVE CLASSIFICATIONS 
CALL 4aS-3430 



SPARE TIME BUSINESS 

Own youi own profitable vending business. $200 to $600 month 
iy earnii«s possible in your spare time (day or eve.). NO 
SELLING. If idected, you will be servicing company established 
loca^nt. 

OUR COMPANY IS A SUPPLIEU 
OF NABISCO SNACK ITEMS. 

REQUIREMENTS: $1,000 to $5,000 CASH INVESTMENT, 
(secured by machines and merchandise) 

good character, dependable auto, and 6 
to 9 spare hours weekly. Income starts 
immediately! We supply product, machines, 
locations, expansion financing, buy back 
option, and professional guidance. If you 
are sincerely interested in applying for this 
genuine opportunity toward financial 
success, please call or write (include 
p)ione number) for personal interview in 
your area to: ^^ ^^^^^^ ^ anderson 

WORLD INDUSTRIES INC. 
Exwutive Suite 303 
1919 E«t 52nd Street 
IndlwiaptNis, Indiana 46205 
Tal^MMW (317) 257-5767 



TELEPHONE SOLiCITOR 
Call between 8 and 10a.m., 
3404162. 

INSURANCE Secretary — 
Insurance agency lias 
career opportunity for 
individual interested In 
becoming an insurance 
secretary. Call 425-7220. 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Unusual npporiunity lor 
rigti' person, attractive, 
nea'. good personality. Meet 
exciting people. Higti in 
come. Call days 2 lo 3 p.m. 
623 7858; nights 490 1749, Mr 
Green. 

REAL ESTATE 
SALESuPEOPLE 
Excelleni opponuniiy witti 
aggressive lirm on iHoliand 
Rfi. Exc«l.|eni training 
program ahf)-^jg|ge benefits. 
Earn wtiilc you learn. 
Anyone can rio it. Jackson 
Really, 4900555 



WANTED 
IMMEDIATELY! 

6 men and women to start 
in good paying fob. 

Excellent working 
conditions. Bonuses and 
other company benefits 
provided 

No experience necessary. 
We will train you. 

C»IM9»-27«3 



36 |pbs Wanttd 



BABYSITTING In my 

home. Amphibious Base 
area. 4600874. 



BABYSITTING in my 
home Infant to 3 years 428 
40SI 



LITTLE FRIEND to play 
with, my mnmmy will take 
care ©t you ^mnt your^ 
wiirks w.nd«,or Woods 340 
67«S 



S2 Homehold Goods 

$458.00 rielivers 3 room 
outfit. Early American, 
Spanish or Modern. 1st 
small monthly payment 
starts 45 days after 
delivery. Household 
Furniture Corp., 1917 
Lafayette Blvd., near 
corner of Tidewater dr., in 
Norfolk, Phone 622 4165. 

FUR N I Tu"r ^^/roi^/^odel 
homes. Bedroom or Living 
Room, $99.95, Dinette, 
Mattress set, Recliner, 
Bunk Beds, $68 each , Maple 
Boston Rocker, $45. Easy 
terms. Call Mr. Kay at 623- 
4100, dealer. 

STEREO FIREPLACE BAR 
Stereo tireplace with 
liquor cabinet, AMFm 
stereo s track and 
phonograph. , BeauHful 
cabine' only 4 monttis old. 
Pairi $350. Yours for $250. 425 
1991 

S3 Wanted to Buy 

ELECTRIC TRAIN 
COLLECTOR Retired 

railroad man. Any kind, any 
condition, pay good price. 
545 6242 

ELECTRIC TRAINS - 
Lionel, Anjerlcan Flyer, 
Ives, others. Cash. 497-4213. 

WE NEED BADLY 
Cash paid for cameras, tape 
recorders, stereos, TV's, 
Band Instruments, 
Typewriters, guns. 

LITTMAN'S 
201 City Hall av. 622 6989 

58 Good Thwy Too Eal 

WE SELL Live Crabs, by 
the do?en or by the bushel. 
Earl Smith Oyster Co., 947 
Nurds rd , 3405171 

61 Feed k Fertilizw 

* HORSE MANURE 
$6.00 pickup Iciart 
126 2572 



86 For Sale Viiginia Beach 

HILLTOP MANOR - 3 
bedroom ranch, corner lot. 
Call Joe Robinson, 486 4041 or 
464 4839 We trade. Higgins 
Roaliy, Inc., REALTOR. 

LAUREL COVE - Colonial 4 
t)edroom, 2' s bath home with 
fireplace. Pay equity and 
assume 7 per cent VA loan. 
Call Joe Robinson, 486-4041, 
or 464-4839. We trade. 
Higgins Realty, inc., 
REALTOR. 

PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA — 
3 bedroom, 2 bath ranch. Pay 
equity and assume 534 per 
cent VA loan. Call Joe 
Robinson, 4864041, or 464 
4839. We trade. Higgins 
Really, Inc. REAL TOfi. 

WINDSOR OAKS 4 

t;ctiro(mi, 2ijv bath ranch, 
flai^in kii'crtWP'wiitn^antry, 
largp lanHlv rftfWr with 
tireplace and sliding door to 
■ver'i/c paiif. Extra work 
pace :n large 2 car tiarage 
20 '< 30 I' basketball court, 
large 'reert lot (in cul rie • ac 
Call Jint Sawyer, 486 4041 or 
140 3181. Wc 'rade. Higgins 
Reali,, Inc. REALTOR 

VIRGINIA B E^^ H 
(Borough) — 4 bedroom 
Colonial. Early posesslon 
Zoned Multi family. Call Roy 
Wilkes, 486 4041 or 486 1796 
Wc trade. Higgins Realtv 
Inc. REALTOR 



87ForSd<Chegipe»ke 

ALBEMAR^^CRE^^ 
tjedrooms, 2 baths, large 
country kitchen, $39,000 No 
aqait^. 482 3904 

93 Lou For Sale 

CREEDS, Beaoiilul building 
lot, 1 acre, 2 nld oak trees, 
septic lank i well $7,200 425 
53)3, 425 1197. 

WWmtcdRoriEMMe 



CAIM TALKS 

we buy & sell. Need Homes. 
Call 464 6205 Crowgey 
Realty 



lammf^ 



mm 



Real Estate 



Tfw Sun-VIMiwtday, May 15, 1974-l>)i«a B-7 



Timely tips 
on buying 
a gift watcli 

By Peter Weaver 

Q. I want lo buy a good watch for my son's 
graduation from coHege. What's the best way to buy a 
watch? - Mrs. M.R., Los Angeles, Calif. 

.\. \% go to a rqmtable jeweler who has a 
watchmaker or repair expe/'t on the premises. A fairly 
good quality indicator is price. If you're lookii^ for a 
t(9 quality t!mq)iecewith fine movements, you'll have 
to pay $150 and up. A good. sra^iceabJe watch will cost 
$75 and up and a modest watch $40 to $:^. Anythii^ 
below $35 or so falls into the "disposabie" category. 
You wear it until it doesn't work and then toss it. 

A 17-jewel, mechanical "chronometer" watch should 
last indefinitely if properly cleaned and oUed. Watch 
movements tested by Swiss labwatories are given 
chronometer ratings. A good, meclunical watch that 
loses or gains time can be adjusted and corrected by a 
watchmaker. 

Watches with solid state electronic movements are 
the most accurate. However, the quartz crystal in 
these watches can be affected by hard knodcs or 
drastic temperature changes. 



Mind Your Money 

Q. I ordered 500 zoysia grass plugs for $19.95 from a 
mail-order hoise. I' thought the "plugs" would be 
separate. When I received was five sheets with some 
performations. With postage due, the whde thing came 
to $27.82. After inquiring about these grass sheets (the 
si:% of a small rug) , I learned from a local nursery that 
I could have bought them for $5 — or $1 per sheet. I 
hope you will use my letter to warn the public not to be 
taken by these glowing, mail-order "bargains." — 
M.A.F., Sedalia, Mo. 

A. So warned. Some mail-order houses, however, do 
offer legitimate bargains. You have to know with 
whom you're dealing. A check with local nurseries 
(tften reveals some mail-order "bargains" to be 
overpriced. 

Q. Shortly after we moved into a rental garden 
apartment, we were hit by a torrential rain and our 
kitchen floor flooded. The spring warmth and moisture 
must have expanded the windows, so none op&i f reelv. 
We had to move in a hurry and didn't get a chance to 
tb(Ht>ughly inspect the place or to talk to the other 
hapless tenants. Short of moving again, what can we do 
with a landlord who promises everything bui does 
nothing? — Mrs. L.H., Washington, D.C. 

A. Some local jurisdictions provide tenants with 
more legal rights than others. You should see a lawyer. 
If you have low income, you may qualify for free legal 
services. Check with your local court or bar 
associatioD to see where legal services or l^al aid can 
be obtained. 

If you try to fight the landlord on your own and get 
local building inspectm^ to force the landlord into 
needed repairs, you may win the battle but lose the 
war. In some areas, landlords can retaliate against 
this king of uppity treatment from tenants by kicking 
them out on short notice. An attorney will know just 
what method to use on a landlord — a method that 
won't get you tossed out. Check several attorneys — if 
you don't qualify for free legal service — to see what 
they would charge to do the job. 

Q. I read that some states have special tax discounts 
for senior citizens. Can you tell me which states give 
these benefits to retired people? — MO.O., Menlo Park, 
Calif. 

A. The most comprehensive guide to the various tax 
treaks for (dder Americans is called "Tax Facts for 
Older Americans — Comparative Guide to State Tax 
Regulations." It lists the tax goodies state by state. 
You can get a free cq)y by writing: American 
Association of Retired Persons, 1909 K. St., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20006. 

YOUR KNKRGY MONKV: With warmer weather 
coming up, don't let the service station attendant fill 
your gas tank to the brim. In the heat, the gasdine 
expands and will spill out. Gasoline spillage throu^ 
over-filling of tanks is a major waste of fuel and it's 
akoan appreciable source of air pollution. Just ask the 
attendant to fill the tank to the click-off point (no extra 
squirts). 

e KlagPralnret Syndicate, Inc., in4. 
Ptttr Wtafw wvlcomw quastions fhMn nadm 

tot possiblt use in his column. Fleaw aeiid Jettws 

to him in can ot Vitginii fieach Sun, 138 Host- 

mottt Road, Vaginia Beach, Va. 23452. 

Designers Join 
in partnership 



Two local interior 
designers have formed a 
new interior decorating 
and design Ixisiness called 
the Design Guild. 

Alexancter McKay and 
Irene Freedland are 
partners in the new venture 
at 823 W. 2l8t St., Norfolk. 
The Design Guild will 
design home interiors as 
well as commercial and 
public properties. 

Ms. MacKay attended 
the University of Cin- 
cinnati College of Design, 



Architecture and Art. She 
specializes in space- 
planning and remodeling of 
old homes and buildings. 
She is a Virginia Beach 
resident. 

Ms. |i¥«edand has a , 
bachelors degree in in- 
terior design from the 
University of Maryland. 
She has worked in furniture 
design and display, interior 
decorating for fureral 
tiomes and interior design 
for offices and homes m the 
Washi^ton. D.C, area. 
She is a resident of Norfolk. 



PmHiroki ONiitt MmniMNits 



PENHROKE COURTS MONTHLY PAYMENTS 
(AH utilitwi in^idad) 



Onabadroom 
2-torfreem Typ* I 
iTypall 
iTnMlll 
I Typ« IV 



340nroofn 

3^w ho < H W TownhoM* t31B 



S190 
$215 
S218 

S23« 

SSO 



(kina M* batfroom, full bath) 

(flroand llaer, 1H bathe) 

I uptMn. 1H balM 

(terpr Mon|a anM, 1H bithi) 

(laifay iinfia pooiiif Bsttoiiy 

■ndklMMM, IHbrtiri 

IIHkMM 

(1733 iq. ft. b^ 2H bMhi. 

woHi-in Ratals, 3 ^tiai) 



Small businesses 
get federal break 



Small business experiencing difficulties 
with feda'al red tape may receive some reltef 
from two bills co-sponsored in ttie House trf 
Represoitatives by the Hep. G. WUUam 
Whitehurst (R-Va.). 

The firet bill changes the presoit quarterly 
wage reporting system fw Social Security 
punjoses to an annual system. The tegislation 
introduced by Rep. Whitehurst would 
eliminate the quarterly wage report (internal 
Revenue Service form 941) and rely on W-2 
forms on an annual basis. 

The bill, H.R. 14605, is co-sponsored by Hep. 
All UUman (D-Ore.) and Rep Gus Yatron CD- 
Pa.) 

The second »nall business bill provides 
technical assBtance to businesses in com- 
plying with the Occupational Safety and 
Health Act (OSHA). The bill authorizes the 
Small Business Administration to provide 



i-ocal realtors 
form new firm 



Fred Soles and Robert J. 
Crocker have formed a 
partnership and opened a 
new real estate and in- 
surance business, Crocker 
and Associates Realty Inc., 
at 2220 Virginia Beach 
Blvd. 

Mr. Crocker, owner of 
Robert J. Crocker Real 
Estate in Virginia Beach, is 
a graduate of Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute. He is 
former sales manager 
of Etheridge Baylor 
Hofheimer Inc., real estate 
and insurance. 



Mr. Soles, former 
manager of DeHart Realty, 
is graduate of East 
Carolina University. He 
also is former manager of 
See Realty and a former 
teacher in the Virginia 
Beach public schools. Mr. 
Soles was named Salesman 
of the Year for 1973 by the 
Virginia Beach Board of 
Realtors. 

The new company will 
specialize. in all types of 
real estate, with emphasis 
on residential, commercial 
and investments. 



Nassau Plants 
expands stock 



Nassau Tropical Plants 
has expancted its tropical 
plants store to offer a 
complete line of lawn and 
garden supplies. 

The plant store, located 
in Kempsville Plaza on 
Princess Anne Road, has 
moved to larger facilities 
in the shopping center to 



accommodate the stock 
expansion. In addition to a 
variety of tropical plants, 
the new garden and hard- 
ware center will now 
carry lawn fertilizers and 
grass seed, as well as other 
garden essentials. Tropical 
plants arc priced from 75 
cents to $75. 



Godwin cuts ribbon 
opening new hotel 



Gov. Mills E. Godwin will 
officiate at ribbon-cutting 
ceremonies marking the 
formal opening of the 
Sheraton Beach-Inn 
Tuesday at 4:30 p.m. 

Invited guests will 



celebrate the hotel opening 
by attending a reception 
after the co^mony at the 
inn's Promenade 
Ballroom. 

The new hotel is at 36th 
Street and Oceanfront. 



SEU.ING..RENTtNG..BUYING.TRM)ING 

BISSEH REALTY, INC. 

"A Respected Name In Real Estate" 

Thalia Shopping Center 
4316 Virginia Beach BM. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 23452 

MUte Vance, GRI3«K7000 Lowdl Powers, 420-38W! 
Rose Bissett,GRI 840-9898 Lee O'Mcn 340-4084 

RENTALS 

Jack Biwtt, OR! 340-5626 

OFFICE 340-9721 








IMIIIIIKIi 



EVERYTHING FOR YOUR HOME 



FREE ESTIMATES 

'Kitchens •Family Rooms 

'Bedrooms •Convert 

Goroges 



ALL WOJlfC 
INSUMD 



545-4613 



A&led ^Mce to yoiy home mnuis added v^ue to 
your home. Make your honw more nmafortable and 
cOTvenient by Kiding.i n>om...Don't Writ...CALL NOW 



consultatim and advice to empk^ers without 
beii^ cited for violations. 

REP. WHITEHURST SAID that the current 
system ott^ results in fines wh«i the 
business person invites an OSHA inspector to 
visit his pace of business to see if he is in 
compliance with all laws. 

The OSHA biU, H.R. 14244, is co^ponsored 
l>y Rep. J«rry Litton (D-Mo.) 

Many smaU businesses are concerned about 
"the growing paper work tHirdens imposed on 
them by the federal government," Rep. 
Whitehurst said. 

He feels that small independent business 
firms are finding it more and more difficult to 
stay in business while coping with increased 
costs (rf operation, shortages of materials, 
paperwork problems and the expense of 
complying with complex federal regulations. 




Opens 
senfhe 

Madeleine G.Winfree 
has opened a court 
reporting service in 
the l^ndon Bridge 
area. She has 19 
years experience in 
the legal field. 



Rent beautiful 
new furniture 




with purchase option 
Our laige Aow-mom featuiet 200 combliutkint <a 
qmiity Auntiufe that yoa can lease widi the option 
to puiduM. Rent individiuri itenu or compleic 
ytMpi at kiw monthly niet. We tfM offn office 
ftuniture, TV'i, l>an and a compieie accMoiy 
boutique — i on»«tep fumitufe centet. Ffea local 
deihreiy on 12 month leaief. 

FURNITURE RENTAL 



METROLEASE 



4995 Cteveland St., Vir^nia Beach, Va. 
I Phone (804f 499-9888 

Off WHcMuck Md. Mt«MMi VlrebM ■(•di BM. a tlM MeHMnMni. 




Hiianc^Business/Econoniy 



Hostesses tor greet 
Food Fair shoppers 



Food Fair shoppers 
may have a pleasant 
surprise in store when 
they visit any Virginia 
Food Fair supermarket 
during peak shopping 
days, Tliursday through 
Saturdays. 

Starting las t 
Thursday, Food Fairs 
began employing 
hostesses to greet 
sh(^^rs, guide them to 
advertised and 
unadvertised specials, 
answer customer 
questions, help with 
com[daints and act as 
general trouble- 
shooters. 

The hostesses will 
relieve some of the 
burdens of the store 
manager, explained a 
spokesman for the 
Hilltc^ North Food Fair 
st(»«. 



"They'll have the 
time to answer 
customer complaints 
and talk to the 
customers to find out 
what they want and 
where we can 
improve, " the 
spdtesman said. "The 
managers just don't 
have the time to do all 
that." 

THE HOSTESSES are 

part of an expanded 
program of shopper 
service at Food Fairs. 
Other new services 
include free crushed ice 
for individuals or 
groups planning parties 
and the complimentary 
use of a 30-cup electric 
coffee urn for social 
groups or other 
organizations having 
special functions. 
A Food Fair regional 



vice-president said the 
expanded services will 
not mean higher prices 
to customers. 

Food Fair has 23 
supermarkets in 
Virginia, including 
stores in Virginia 
Beach, Norfolk, 
Hampton, Williams- 
burg. Richmond 
Petersburg and Hope- 
well. 





Member 
Realtors 
MLS 

USTOMI 

lEALTY CORP.! 
lyiAKING THE 

lyiOVE? 

CALL 
US 

FIRST 
OR 

LAST 

CALL 42&3800 obligation 

1788 Va. Bea ch Blvd. Va. Bea ch, Va . 



NEIL CAVKNDAN 

HIALTOR 

AMOCtATI 



I For penonal urvice, call me any- 
time at 426-3800 or home, 
420-3506. Thwe is alao a complete 
itaff at Custom Realty ready to 
eerve you with Customized Real 
Estate Service 



HOW 
MUCH 
DO YOUR 
UTILITIES 
COST 



I 




REGENCY 

ALL UTILITIES 
INCLUDED! 
SEE OUR FURNISHED 
MODEL 

•IHIUTOP 

1,2,&3 bedroom 

Apartments, 

Townhouses, 

Garden and Bachelor. 

LASKINROADAT 
HILLTOP 
PHONE: 42^6813 




LUXURY 
GARDEN APARTMENTS AND TOWNHOUSES 



Laria roenw mNM many oIomU 
OfM to thiM bMrsemi 
Pylly Mrp«<«d— Mund •ntlnMr«d 
IneivMual hMiliit ft ilr eontfitlenint 
IMivMutl prlvato •irtranoM 



Lars* rtaraia rQom oM klichtn 
Otihwailiar, rant* a rafrliarater in all unlli 
ntdnsi for your own wainar a dryar 
Swlmmlni pool abd otuMouta 
Total alaeirle larvlea 



PLANNED FOR ADULT LIVING 

Sliopplna within walking dittanca 
Monthly rantal Includai all utilltlai 

IDEAL LOCATION-IN EXCLUSIVE RESIDENTIAL AREA 

On Haygood Road off Independence Blvd. Around the corner from 
the Haygood Shopping Center. 



CALL 499-3788 



HOME SERVICE — REPAIR GUIDE 







wm^^ 



USE THIS HANDY UP TO DAT! AIPHABETICAUY USTED 
GUIDE FOR AU YOUR SBIVKl NBDSI 




Air Conditioning Elacfrical Contractor Home improwment 



Plastering 



Painting 



COMMERCIAL & 
DOMESTIC REFRIGER 

AT ION <iL%at» 

&Aircond1tT#wng 
Repalrti 
Service W 
4811SW 



ELJBCntlCAL 

ooKnucnM 




D.E. MITCHELL 

426-7262 



■# 



HOME IMPROVEMENTS 

I iimtier .ind huildltm m.itcriAts, 
room .idditJons, slorm tioors <ind 
. in*)W^. ».ill lo »rtll (drpel 
vinyl aiding f rcc (^lim.iiet, 
terms 

ISLLAM*EAT0N,1NC 
427-3»)0 



FOR 

AIR CONDITIONING 

SERVICE AND 

(EP/yR 

CALL 

497 1035 

74 hr SERVICE 



General ContracttN- 



Lawn Mower Service 



Carpeting 



SAVINGSI 

Carpeting anrt 
Custom AAade Draperie' 
H' quality, 

GUARANTEED 

INSTALLATION 
3400114, 3iD41i3 



BLACK 
BROTHERS 

Home liB|m»TemeM 

Contr«etors 

C^rtft BiiUdert 

lto(mi Adtfittons 

Alumloam SidioK 

Roofs - CtrporU 

Kitt^M RenodcU^ 

CALLANTTIA^ 

545-7318 

Hvh E. Hack, Sr. 
IMO Pait Avene 
Ck^petke, Va. 



iMWn Mower Service 
■icycie Repairs, Welding 
aad Onumenttl lion Rail- 

VA. BEACH LAWN 
MOWER & WELMNG 
428-9029 



PLASTERING 
DRY WALL «* 



Home 
Improvementt 




Call '%^ 
CLIFF STOUT 
Ph. 855-5370 



PAINTING INTERIOR 
AEXTERIOR 

Work doner MioiwHj^^ 
J C MOODY & SONS 
6217276 627 0044 



GENE'S DECORATING 

Resitieniial & 

Ciimmerc'dl 

Wallpaperinri & 

Airle^'i Spraying 

FREE ESTIMATES 

486 5746 



Tile 



nastaring 




OVERALL 
DRY WALL WORK 

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Pftg* B-«-The Sun-Wednesday, May 15, 1974 



The devir loses 
in Circuit Court 



The controversial film "The 
Devil in Miss Jones" lost 
another court battle Thursday 
when Jeffrey Clausel, 19, was 
convicted of exhibiting an ob- 
scene motion picture. 

Mr. Clausel was arrested 
shortly after midnight Aug. 19 
when the movie was shown at ^ 
(he Studio Movie Theater on 
Independence Boulevard. At the 
time he was acting manager of 
the theater. 

The Circuit Court conviction 
came on Mr. Clausel's appeal of 
his conviction last September 
by Judge P.B. White in General 



District Court. At that time Mr. 
Clausel was fined $500 and given 
a 30 days suspended jail sen- 
tence. Judge Robert S. Wahab 
Jr., Thursday fined Mr. Clausel 
$100 and gave him a suspended 
12 months jail senten<:e. 



MR. CLAUSEL WAS not 

present for the Circuit Court 
proceedings and was 
represent^ by attorney Alan 
Merman who pled his client 
guilty to the charge. Mr. 
Merman told the court he 
agreed the film was obscene 
under community standards 



and also agreed with Conn- 
monwealth Attorney Andre 
Evans, the prosecutor, that the 
film should be destroyed. The 
film has been in police custody 
since Mr. Clausel's arrest. 

After the trail Mr. Merman 
explained why he did not con- 
test the charge as he had in 
General District Court. He 
pointed out the film had been 
ruled obscene in court 
proceedings in Norfolk since 
Mr. Clausel's earlier con- 
viction'. He felt community 
standards in Virginia Beach 
would be identical to those in 
Norfolk. 




Probation given 
in arson incident 



Edwin A. Michener Jr., 27, 
was placed on unsupervised 
probation for three years for his 
part in the arson fire which 
destroyed the McGinnis Flint 
nightspot last September. Mr. 
Michener also received a 
suspended three-year prison 
sentence. 

Mr. Michener, who resided 
above the Atlantic Avenue club 
at the time of the fire, pled 
guilty to a charge of arson in 
connection 'iwith the Sept. 4 
incident. The club was closed 
at the time, and there were 
no injuries. 

Club owner Theodore Torok 
has already been convicted of 



KARNITSCHNIG 

Medical 
director 

named City requests funds 

fm" computer system 



arson in connection with the 
fire. He received a three-year 
prison sentence and is awaiting 
court proceedings on an appeal 
of his conviction. Two other 
club employes are awaiting trial 
on charges resulting from the 
fire. 

Mr. Michener was a 
prosecution witness during the 
trail of Mr. Torok. During 
Thursday's trial, Assistant 
Commonwealth's Attorney Paul 
Sciortino recommended, that in 
light of Mr. Michener's 
cooperation with the prosecu- 
tion, he be giv^n a suspended 
three-year prison sentence 
and placed on unsuper- 
vised probation for three years. 




Dr. Ann Karnitschnig, 
medical director of the 
Uutreach Clinic, has been 
named medical director of the 
Tidewater Treatment Center, 
the alcholic treatment unit of 
Tidewater Psychiatric Institute 
on Will-0-Wisp Diive. 

She will continue as medical 
director of the drug Outreach 
Ginic on a part-time basis. She 
has been with Outreach since 
March 1972. 

As medical director of the 
Tidewater Treatment Center, 
Dr. Karnitschnig will supervise 
a staff of 20 persons, including 
nurses, psychologists, social 
workers, addiction counselors 
and therapists. 

Dr. Karnitschnig, a native of 
London, received her medical 
training in Scotland, Canada 
and England. 

Since she came to the 
Tidewater area in 1963, she has 
been consultant physician to the 
American Red Cross in Norfolk, 
director of Physicians 
Pathology Laboratory in 
Norfolk, volunteer physician to 
the Norfolk Free Clinic and 
consultant physician to the 
United Cancer Association, 
Family Planning Clinic and 
Child and Youth Clinic. 

She continues to serve as 
consulting physician to family 
planning and maternity clinics 
operated by the Virginia Beach 
Public Health Department. 



Virginia Beach has requested 
$209,853 in federal funds to 
begin, a computer system 
providing data on adult 
criminal offenders. 

The city hopes to establish a 
local criminal justice in- 
formation system to include all 
existing information about 
adults undergoing criminal 
justice processes. 
, The computer system will 
avoid duplication of in- 
formation, lower costs by 
making data available promp- 
tly to proper agencies and 
provide a single source of 



reporting information to the 
state justice department, ac- 
cording to the grant request 
heard by the Virginia Council on 
Criminal Justice last week. 

Virginia Beach requested 
$209,853 in federal funds from 
the Law Enforcement 
Assistance Administration 
(LEAA). The city will provide 
$23,317 in local funds to 
establish the system. 

The grant request from the 
city was recommended for 
approval. It is then forwarded 
to the federal LEAA for final 
approval. 



Drive honors student 



Students at Princess Anne 
High School donated blood to 
the Red Cross Bloodmobile 
Monday in memory of student 
Richard Craig Smith, who died 
Sunday from burns he received 
in a car fire May 6. 

The students planned to 
donate blood to the Bloodmobile 



in their annual blood drive 
before Mr. Smith was injured. 
The students decided to use the 
scheduled blood drive to honor 
his memory and replace the 
blood he used while in the burn 
unit at Norfolk General 
Hospital. 

Mr. Smith, 18, was a senior at 
Princess Anne High School. 



Final 

Council 

votes 



The following are the official 
vote totals from the May 7 
Virginia Beach City Council 
election. Voter turn-out was 
light for the election with 24,439 
persons going to the polls out of 
the city's 78.466 registered 
voters. Six councilmen were 
elected — four borough 
representatives and two at- 
large councilmen. Incumbent 
members of the Council are 
indicated by (I). 

e BAVSIDK 

Holland. Clarence ( I ) 
Winter. Gaynette 

KKMPSVILLR 
McCoy, Dr. H«u-y 
Isdell, Garland (I) 

LVXNIIAVEN 
Griffin. John 
^rvin, Reidd) 

Pi'Nta) 
Waterfield.Floydd) 
AT-I,AK(iK 
Cromwell, Robert (I) 
^Handing. Patrick 
Maibon, Murray (I) 
McClanan.Rebia 
W»erndorf . Meyera 
Macdonald, Cecily 
Smith. Joel 
Bolin. Sandy 
Sorrow, Robert 
Ljnnk, Edward 
Jey, Peter 
Uttie, Drewry 
Muldes,PhUip 




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1.503 

789 

662 

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STUOKNTTOTOl'R 

Carl Bidckmann and Mark 
mUlams Ol Virginia Beach 
luiv« been selected to par- 
tteipaMin "Yeirth on Sage", a 
^H^ misied revue ^»n- 
wsrmi ^ (he Vh^ia Osm- 
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Potter biiis city 
for sand project 



Dinky dinghy 

What can you see at the base for the area's 
mighty amphibious forces? Well, there's all 
these huge Navy ships and then there are 
these.. .uh, rowboats. This dinghy seems 
undaunted by the possibility it might get 
squashed by that vessel tied next to it at 
the Naval Amphibious Base, Little Creek. 
(Sun photo by Rod Mann) 



Inventor Jdbn Potter has Ulled the city 
$108,000 for sand fences he devised and 
installed along a porti(Mi of the resort strip 
to sU^ the erasing (tf the beach. 

Mr. Potter, president ^ Shoreline Erosin 
Control Corporation, bet the city a little 
over a vear aso that the fences would cause 
a build up sand on the beach. The city 
entered into a contract with Mr. Potter that 
called for him to be paid |m6,000 if the sand 
build-up reached two fe^. 

Monday, Mr. Potter met witti Beach 
official and brought along engineers and 
oceanographers who tdd the city the sand 
had built up and Mr. Potter was entitled to 
the money agreed upon. 

THE HUGE steel sand fences were in- 
stalled in the ocean between 17th and TXAh 
streets in March 1973. 



A.J. Chewhing, of Chewning-Hoggard- 
Adkins, Inc., a local engineering firm, told 
the city staff and several councilmen his 
company had measured the sand build-up 
at regular intervals during the year. He 
said the sand has built up in the test area 
more than two feet during that time. 

"It is my conclusion that the sand 
retention device has performed as required 
by the contract with the City of Virginia 
Beach, and that the performance has 
fulfilled the requirements fi that contract 
insofar as the buildtq) of sand betweoi the 



device and the low water line," Mr. 
Chewning said. "The actual build-up 
amounted to 2.6 feet. In many spots the 
ocean floor was raised over six fe^." 

MR. CHEWNING SAID he sees no reason 
the device should not remain in the water, 
but says the city should ctmtinue to monitor ; 
the effectiveness of the fences. 

The city took no action on payment <rf the 
$108,000 bill this week. Neither have they 
paid the $25,000 which Mr. Potter billed the 
city a few months ago for a one foot build- 
up of sand. Community Services Director 
W.W. Flemiig said at that time that the ' 
city probably did owe Mr. Potter the , 
$25,000, accordii^ to the contract. Mr. 
Fleming and other Beach officials, how ' 
ever, were skeptical about the actual ef- . 
f^tiveness tA the device, since the City 
Erosion Commission had been pumping 
sand on the beach in the vicinity of Mr. 
Potter's erosiwi device. 



The Community Services Department 
will continue to make evaluations <tf 
soundings taken in the test strip to deter- 
mine if the city actUially owes Mr. Potter 
the $108,000. Mr. Fleming is to report back 
to Council on its evaluation. 

The city has 30 days to pay the bill, ac-: 
cording to the contract, Mr. Potter said. "I 
don't anticipate any problem (in getting 
payment) at all." 





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49th Year No. 21 



Circulation 22.900 



SUNBEAMS 



"Yours is a remarkable newspaper. The 
Sun is a pleasure."-R.K. Bayside 

"I'm so tired of the patronizing atti- 
tude of the other newspapers. The Sun's 
approach to Virginia Beach is great." - 
Vy.B.. Lynnhavwi. 

For home delivery phone 486-3430 

It was a time 

for non-stars 

in the limelight 

—Page AS 

Bands, floats 

highlight day 

of parade 

—Page A-10 



THE COURTROOM drama 
concerning the evoluti(» of man, 
"Inhmt the Wind," opens Friday at 
the Virginia Beach Little Tlieab-e, Mth , 
Street and Barberton Drive. Tickets 
are $3 for adults »i(i $1.50 for students 
and the military. For information call 
the theatre at 428-9523. 




~Jk-: 



PONY RIDES, games and Cicero the^ 
Clown will all be a part of the carnival 
Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 
Windsor Woods Elementary School. 
Ilie carnival is sponsored by the 
Windsor Woods PTA to raise money for 
educational equipment i<x the school. 

"UP THE DOWN STAIRCASE" will 
be included in tlie Bayside Junicn* High 
School Fidd Day today. The play, at 4 
p.m., is 50 cents for adults and 25 cents 
for students The field day will also 
feature booths and games designed by 
the students, a talrait stow and 
spaghetti dinner. 



Inside 



Two sections 20 pages 

aassified B-8 

Comment A-2 

Features A4 

Ganlening A-6 

Lifestyles B-1 to B-3 

Real Estate :... B-9 

Rtfigion B-3 

Sports A-6 to A-9 



Beach buses to roll June 2 



If you're tired (rf fighting Uie traffic tm Virginia 
Beach Boulewurd to get to work or if you simply 
can't afford a taxi to a nearby shop|Nng center, take 
heart— Vir^nia Beach will soon have buses m the 
road. 

The contracts for bus service in Viiginia Beach 
were finally signed by the Norfolk and Beach City 
Councils last ^tk after months of negotiatioi^ 
Officials expect details for the initial bus system to 
be completed with buses ready to roll June 2. 

The B^iKh bus system will have 24 Tidewater 
Metro Transit (TMT) coaches dedicated to the 
city's service. Seventeen of the buses will actually 
be on the routes, with the remaining seven coaches 
available in emergency or for use when the regular 
buses need maintenance. 

THE-nDEWATERTransportationDistrict (TTD) 
Commission is also preparing a federal grant ap- 
plication to tlK Urban Mass Transit Authority 
which w(Nild allow the district to purchase 10 buses 



from Carolina Trailways Bus Co. Routes for any 
additional bises have not been worked out. 

The liMis system, as it now stands, is primarily a 
commuter service hetween the Beach and Norfolk. 
Resident may travel within the city, however, 
fro(R the north end of the beach down Laskin Road 
Iftd Virginia Beach Boulevard. All intra-city travel 
^fi cost 35 pents. 

'Fares for pi^sengers traveling from the Beach to 
Norfolk have been calculated on a zone fare system 
with persons paying from 45 cents to 75 cents 
depending on where they toard the bus. 

MANY OF THE buses will travel only during the 
peak traffic hours (6 a.m. to 9 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. to 
6:30 p.m.) although service from the beach down 
Virginia Beach Boulevard will be from 6 a.m. to 
8:40 p.m. 

The major routes will include a Virginia Beach 
Boulevard Local from 87th Street and Atlantic 
Avenue to downtown Norfolk (running every 35 



minutes in peak hours and every 70 minutes in off- 
hours); an Independence Boulevard route from 
Pembroke Mall to the Norfolk Naval Base (NOB) 
during peak traffic hours; a Shore Drive route from 
«7th Street and Atlantic Avenue to Norfolk via 
Shore Drive to Northhampton Boulevard and 
Princess Anne Road (one run during oeak traffic 
hours and a shopper's special leaving t^Beach at 
9:30a.m, and departing Norfolk at 3:30 fTm.); and 
routes from the north end of the beach to Princess 
Anne Plaza Shopping Center and then ejqjress to 
Norfolk or NOB via Interstate 64. 

Five special commuter shuttles will run every 30 
minutes during peak traffic hours to carry 
passengers to Princess Anne Plaza Shopping Center 
Riders may transfer to the express bus to Norfolk or 
the naval base. All transfers will be free. 

The use of all routes will be evaluated every 90 
days and various routes may be added or defeted 
depending on demand. 




Shadows 
ofmaph 

The maple leavet, ilUioHeUed 
against (he bright Virginia 
Heach Hi<y, stand motlonles* in 
llip hot aftprnoon during one of 
tiip Rummer-tike days laitt 
wpeit. (.Sun plioto by Rod Mann) 



$25,000 TO POTTER 



Sand fence nets cash 



Inventor John Potter won a ^5,000 payment from 
the city Monday for his erosion control device in the 
waters of the resort strip. But a controversy 
remains over whether the city owes Mr. Potter an 
additional $83,000. 

Accordii^ to tte contract signed by tte city awl 
Mr. Potter a little over a year ago, Mr. Potter's 
company. Shoreline Erosion Control Corp., was to 
receive $25,000 for a biuld-up of one foot of sand in 
front of the steel sand fences. The city was to pay 
the company $108,000 if the sand build-up reached 
two feet. 

The controversy centers around interpretation erf 
the contract— though the city agrees with figures of 
the buildiq) submitted by Chewning-Hc^ard- 
Adkins Inc., a local engineering firm. Owen 
Pickett, attorney for Mr. Potter, contends that the 
city owes Mr. Potter the full $108,000 since the 
change in the elevation of sand between the device 



and the low water line has reached the two-foot 
level. 

BUT. CITY officials say the contract's test area 
was to include not only the area in front of the 1,000 
feet device but also two 500 foot sections of the 
ocean floor on the sides of the device. 

The City Council approved the contract with Mr, 
Potter by a vote of 6-5 and the fences were installed 
in March 1973, The councilmen voted to pay him 
$25,000 Monday by a vole of 9-1. Vice-mayor Reid 
Ervin, who said he had opposed the contract from 
the beginning, voted against payment. Councilman 
Itobert Callls was attsenf . 

Though Mr. Potter refused to comment Monday, 
It is expected he will ask ( according to provisions in 
the contract) that the matter go to arbitration in an 
cffort^o collect the full $108,000. ^^ 



CZI 



□ 



d] 



\=m^ 



□ 



en 



SSMOHp 



Closed 
council 



The Virginia Beach City 
CouNcil net MMday for n 
minnles in closed session, 
«^n to neither the public 
nor the pr«s. The agenda 
itol«l ••an>oi>l^i"^>>" ^* 
connlBion and a "toy f 
BMtl«rfwdbcusslaa. In It 
^^i^ so far thh yar, 
tke CflMcU has net (or !• 
hours and 23 nlnales 
keMad cloMd lMr«, 



Abductioh, murder trial 
verdict expected 



By LES LEHIGH 
Sub Staff Writer 

The trial of John Stephen Gilreath, 23, 
charged with abduction with inteiKl to 
defile and murder by ImfMlsonment in 
the death of 14-year-old Natalia Semler 
is expected to go to a Circuit Court jury 
Thursday morning. The jtay of six men 
arrf six women may reralef a verdict as 
early as that afternoon. 

The halt -nude body of the i^rl was 
found last Oct, 30 tiwl toa tree at tte all- 
^rl Madeira School near McLean, Va. 
where she was a student. Her futher 
fmind the body during a searrh which 
began the night before when she failed to 
return home from classy. 

Police say Mr, Gilreath became a 
|M-imesittpMt in the case because (tf his 
convicticm in the 1971 abducttra ami 
attemi^ed rape of another staxteot at the 
schmri. Her«:eived a ^year su^^entM 
sentence on cmditicm titat he \mder%Q 
psychiatric trratment, 

ACX'ORDING TO in^sttgatOTS the 



girl's hands trad been tied over her head 
so tightly ttiat the binding had to be cut 
to free her from the tree. Her slaclp and 
shoes were fmmd near the body. An 
autq>sy diow^ she di^ of shock, 
exhaustion and exposure abmit ll:30 
p.m. tlw night before she was found. 
Iliere was no evidetve she had t>e^ 
r^ped. The time <rf her aMuction was 
placed at abmit noon the day bef<N% h^ 
discovery. 

Fairfax County inv^Ugators told tte 
court that Mr. Gilreath cmf^sed t* 
police the night after the girl's body was 
found. Fairfax County Commmwealth's 
Attaney RcAert F. Horan Jr. said Mr. 
Gilreath gave police a detailed accmmt 
of the incittent awl re-enacted thexirime 
at Ihe seem. 

Mr. Gilreath's court-appointed 
defeme attorneys contended that his 
cwfesran wm made to satisfy police 
after kmg Iwurs di interrogation. In a 
sec<M)d part rf their deface, the lawyers 
said ttat if Mr. Gilreath did, in fact, 
CMnmit tl« crime, he wi» acting mi an 
(Sot gilreath, ptge AlO) 




DEPUTY SHGRirVlg escort John Gilreath 
to cowt during his trial tor (he mur^r of a 14- 
year-<M Fah^ax County girl. tSun pteto by 
L«s LeMgh) 



Patients face 
higher costs in 

Beach hospital 

By LINDA MILLER 
Sun Staff writer 

Along with the rising coste of almost everything, a 
Virginia Beach iiMpital patient's total hospital bill 
soon will go up 50 cents a day, 

W. Earl Willis, vice-president and administrator 
of the General Hospital of Virginia Beach, says the 
increase In hospitalization c(»t is a result of 
legislation passed in the last session of the Virginia 
General Assembly, 

During the last legislative session, state 
representatives passed a bill to remove charitable 
immunity for non-profit htspitals from the state 
code. Charitable Immunity was, in the past, given 
to non-profit hcrapitals rendering charit)- service to 
patients, l^e immunity protected the htspltal from 
lawsiiiis Xs a corporation if a patient alleged 
negligence or malpractice on the part d hMpltal 
personnel. Individual members of the hospital staff 
were, however, subject to suit 

niK Bll-L TO take away the hospital's immunity 
from such lawsuite was passed unanimously by the 
House of Delegates and by a close vote in tte 
Senate. All hosplUls will be subject to hihire 
lawsuits for negligence or malpractice when the law 
goes into effect July 1 "unless such hrapital ren<tera 
exclusively charitable medical services for which 
service no charge is ever made. "All Virginia Beach 
representatives voted in favor of the bill to remove 
the hospital immunity. 

Withmit the immunity, the Beach h(^pital will be 
forc«l to lay higher insurance premiums ai^ to 
nieol Ihi' c(^ts of legal staff to deal with what Mr. 
Willis terms "nuisance claims and suits ' He says 
there is no choice but to pass those c(Bts on to the 
paUeht. 

Mr Willis said he feels "a hospital cannot be 
negligent, " and if perswmel or doctors within the 
tospital are negligent, they should assume the 
responsibility as ttey have in tte past. 

BCT, .STATE SEN. Joseph A, Canada says that's 
part of the problem with the immunity clause— the 
personnel many times dws not ha%'e to assume the 
responsibility and a patient has no irtlKr legal 
recourse, 
' Exactly who is responsible in maljMractice cases is 
a "^'ague area," according to Sen Canada. "While 
the hmpitah say the personnel can and shwild be 

(^ HOSPITAL, p^ A-10) 



y 



rmmmm 



Comment 



Page A-2-The Sun-Wednwday, May 22, 1974 



An editorial: 



Scars from scare 



As a nation, we seemed to have 
weathered the storm of the oil 
crisis without serious scars. Locally, 
there is still some concern on the 
impact of the gasohne shortage on 
the tourist industry, however. 

Chamber of Commerce and city 
officials note that tourism inquiries 
are down almost 20,000 from last 
year, but several innkeepers have 
pointed out optimistically that 
inquiries are picking up. Many 
blame the situation on the media, 
claiming that press coverage of the 
gasoline shortages have 
discouraged people from traveling. 
What we need, they say, is to alert 
.potential tourists to the fact that 
they will be able to get gasoline 
when they come to Virginia Beach. 

But the oil industry may be the one 
to carry long-term scars. Profits 
may be up, but its public image is 
way, way down. 

: A GALLOP POLL during the 
Jieight of the gasoline shortage last 
winter showed that more Americans 
were blaming the oil industry for the 
state of affairs than were blaming 
the Arabs . With the industry reporting 
i-ecord profits for 1973 — a 51.2 per 
cent jump in one year for the top 10 



U.S. oil companies— it was difficult 
to argue ttuit higher fuel prices were 
only lining the pockets of ^he sheiks. 

The companies deserve some 
credit for discussing their financial 
affairs more candidly in recent 
months than they ever did in the 
past. We are now assured that the 
big profits of '73 will be plowed into 
exploration for new sources of oil. 
Congress should not have to enact 
tax legislation to nudge the 
companies in that directicm if they 
can offer credible evidence that 
their profits are indeed being 
applied to the estimated $800 billion 
cost of developing new gas and oil 
productirai from presently-untapped 
sources in the next decade. 

What the public wants is an 
adequate supply of fuel at a fair 
price. Oil companies now face the 
fact thatoa great many Americans 
are no longer convinced that a 
massive and intricate multinational 
industry responsible only to itself is 
dedicated to that end. This 
unfavorable image can probably be 
corrected by a maximum of candor 
on the part of the oil companies. If it 
is not corrected, the industry can be 
assured of a serious assault in the 
U.S. Congress. 





Chyside 

ByLHMlall/mhr 

Getting a look 
behind dte liars 



Most persons probably wouldn't care to see life 
behind the bars of a jail, bat Assistant City 
Managier George Hanbury and Oral ^Lambert, ^ 
director of General Services, spent last week in 
various California jails. 

The two city officials are studying plans of jails to 
get ideas for the new Virginia Beach City Jail to be 
constructed in 1975. The city is working with Marion 
Earner and Associates, a California based firm 
which specializes in plans for jail facilities. 



EVERYONE KNOWS to call Virginia Beach City 
Council members city councilmen, but what does a 
person call members of the Planning Commission. 

The question has always seemed to baffle Beach 
citizens. Should one call them sirs ( even though 
there is one woman on the commission), 
commissioners or just ignore their titles and start 
in presenting the case. And what does one call the 
person who heads the commission? 

Planning Commission Chairman Bailey T. 
Parker gets called by all sorts of titles at regular 
commission meetings. At last week's meeting one 
resident began by addressing him as "your honor, " 
while another called him "Mr. President." Mr. 
Parker only blushed as other members of the 
commission chuckled. 

(It's probably a safe bet, however, that Mr. 
Parker would rather be a commission chairman 
called by many titles than the real "Mr. President" 
whose name is in the news everyday.) 



THE COUNCIL HAS been discussing 
appointments to varimis boards and commissions 
for several weeks but has had a hard time deciding 
•on new members. 

It seems there's been a mix-i$^n what boards 
and commission appointments need to be made. 

Appointifients that were finally made last week 
included David Stormont III to fill the unexpired 
term of Wesley D. Payne on the Wetlands Board; 
Ann Middleton to fill the unexpired term of Richard 
Brydges ap the Tidewater Regional Health 
Planning Clouncil and Calvin Spain to fUl a new seat 
OTJ the Health Council. 

The councitaFien have yet to make decisions on 
apiwintmenis to the SEVAMP (Southeastern 
Virginia Areawide Model Program) Boani, the 
Library and Law Library Boards and the Minimum 
HMising Board. 



THERE WILL BE no Ccmncil meeting Monday 
iKcame of the Memorial Day holiday. 



^ii 



OAVIO R DtAK 



vun 

An Independent Netmpaper 

STAN MARTIN NEAL BBITTON SIMS 



lONORA IXA OLDAKER 



JAM 



,H 



KACM n«l.l941NG aMI>OMATKM 
Vir^ili tnc*. Viifini* 23^ 




Grady Hedgespeth, a senior at Kempsville High 
School, recently won the Go6d Citizenship Award con- 
test sponsored by Rep. G. William Whitehurst (R-Va.). 
Mr. Hedgespeth and Norfolk winner Tim Harrison were 
Congressnwn for a Day in Washington, D.C. on May 1 
as Rep. Whitehurst's guests. Mr. Hedgespeth wrote the 
following account of his day in the nation's capitol. 



AWE-FILLED DAY 



Stiident's day with Congress 
focuses on impeachment issue 



By GRADY B. HEDGESPETH 
Special to The Sun 

There is a certain undefinable mystique that 
surrounds the nation's capital. Even after countless 
visits, a subdued feeling of awe still arises in me 
when I cross the Potomac. That feeling is in- 
tensified when one realizes that he will soon be in 
the midst -of the American democratic process. 
These were my first reactions as I began my day as 
a Congressman, as a winner in the Good Citizenship 
Contest, sponsored by Rep. G. William Whitehurst 
(R.-Va.). 



Tim Harrison, the winner from Norfolk, and I 
were greeted early Wednesday morning by Rep. 
and Mrs. Whitehurst at National Airport. The 
conversation on the way to the Capitol focused on 
impeachment, as would most of the conversation 
that day. However, th^re was a side to the 
Washington life of a Cogressman that began to 
surface almost immediately. This was a very 
human side that the public seldom sees. We 
sometimes forget that these persons are human 
just like the rest erf us. As the day progressed it 
became more evident that a congressman isn't a 
demigod; ttit a public servant. 

The day started with a breakfast in the cafeteria 
of the Rayburn Office Building. Amazement is the 
only word to describe the feeling one gets when he 
realizes the personalities that are all around. Yet,^ 
when placed in the proper perspective, it could 
have been a typical cafeteria as in any busings 
district. Nevertheless, one can't help but think of 
the many conversations of national importance that 
might hie taking place. The ramversation at our 
table ranged from the just released White House 
tape transcripts to Rep. Whitehurst's developing 
beard ( due to the lack (rf hot water in the apartment 
on that particular morning). 

AFTER BREAKFAST, a tour of the 
Congressman's office was the next item on the 
agenda. In the (H-ocess I got throughly kst and 
confused in the maze (rf tunnels, corridws and 
elevators that connect the Capitol complex. One 
can imagine the confusion that must take place 
when the new cwigressmen and their staffs come 
for the first time at the t)eginning of each new term. 

Most of the work in Rep. Whitehurst's office fall 
into two categories— cwstituent or l^lslative 
oriented. Constituent work, for which most of the 
staff g( 12 is hired, induct answering mail aixl 
handling varimis request and complaints from 
people in the district. M<wt of the other work is 
related to the more familiar and gloried business <rf 
votir^ on different pieces of l^islation. 

I asked Rep. Whitehurst which he felt was the 



more important of the two jobs. His reply was most" 
definite. "A Congressman is first of all a public 
servant, and his first responsibility is to his con- 
stituents." He went on to say that one of the most 
satisfying parts of the job was "tieing able to help 
someone back in the district get through some of 
the unnecessary red tape" that we are so often 
faced with. 

THE HF:st of the morning was spent visiting 
different House committees and visiting the floor of 
the House. Although I had visited the House 
Chambers perviously, the mitlook is completely 
different from the floor as opposed to the balcony. It 
was at this point that our conversation with Rep. 

« Whitehurst turned to the actual details of the office. 
Finances, daily routine and the endless public 
commitments of a representative were the topic of 
discussion at lunch in the House of Representatives 
Restaurant. We noted that Rep. Whitehurst keeps a 
detailed account of all expenditures as he must 
answer to the I.R.S. At first glance the $42,000 
salary of a representative sounds pretty good, but 
when the many costs of being a congressman are 
added together, the amount proves to be just 
adequate. It's also been over four years since their 

^st pay raise. '^- 

The afternoon was filled with more meetings, a 
picture with the Speaker of the House and personal 
conversation. As the events of Watergate an its 
related affairs had led to the Executive-House 
confrontation, Tim and I expressed our concern 
about the public faith in good government. Rep. 
Whitehurst replied with this anecdote. One 
wedtend during his firsViterm he was home ww- 
shiping at his church. After the service, one of the 
parishioners and long-time friend asked what it was 
like to be up there with all thc»e crooks (referring to 
Washington politicians). To which he replied with 
all candor,"Do ymi think the people of the Second 
District of Virginia are any better judges of 
character than the peqile of the other 
Congressional Districts in this cwintry? When he 
received no reply he said, Ihiless you think I'm^ 
erode too, your generalization is unfounded." Tim 
and I agreed with him that it was going to take a 
concerted public effort to restore faith in our 
government. 



As our plane lifted rff that afternoon and we 
briefly circled over the Capitol before heading 
south, I to<* a moment to reflect on the events of 
the day. The feeling of awe owe again gripped me, 
but this time it was different. I had been, if only for 
a slwrt time, a part of «ir governmental [»-oce^. 
Tim and I tten decided that we might be returning 
sometime in the futtu'e to be a more permanent part 
(rf that awe. 



Tidings 




By 

JSfeat 
Sims 

Sun Editor 



City taxpayers 
holding the bag 



The cities of Norfolk and Virginia Beach find 
themselves in similar situations this morning. After 
attempts to pull off extraordinary bai^aiiung 
transactions, both cities have been left holding the 
b^g— and their taxpayers are a little worse for the 
wear. 

In Norfolk, promises and commitments were not 
enough to convince Joe Wheeler to keep his WFL 
football team, the Ambassadors, in Tidewater. And 
in Virginia Beach, city officials have agreed to sbell 
out $25,000 to John Potter, inventn* of the 
controva-sial sand fence whkh he claims has 
controlled erosion of the resort strip 
beaches . 

About the only similarity between Mr. Wheeler 
^nd Mr. Potter is that they are both businessmen. 
While Mr. Wheeler staged the charade of the 
Virginia Ambassadors for as long as he dared, Mr. 
Potter has consistently claimed that his sand fence 
is functioning and that, according to his contract 
with the city, his company is due payment. 



A<^»**<>*** 



DESPITE EARLY frwit office claims that the 
Ambassadors were in Virginia to stay, it came as 
no surprise here when the team was shifted to its 
third honie. Even as he pledged his allegiance to 
Tidewater, Mr. Wheeler, who describes himself as 
a multi-millionaire, made it clear that he expected 
a quick return on his investment— or at least 
someone else willing to assume part of the risk. 

Even an e}q>anded Foreihan Field would not be 
suitable for long, he said, and our club expects a 
demonstration of local support by a waiting list of 
season ticket purchasers. During the time whra 
2,500 football fans were putting their money down 
for tickets, Mr. Wheeler was busy jetting from 
Norfolk toOrlandoto Califcurnia in search <A a better 
deal. 

If Norfolk officials are embarrased by their 
{xiblic show of faith in Mr. Wheeler, then perhaps a 
lesson was learned. With the exit of first the ABA 
and now the WFL, N^folk fans can spend their 
sporting hours cheering the Tides in their descent 
deeper and deeper into the International League 
cellar. Surely their naivete is a thing of the past 
now, and the next multi-millionaire who comes to 
town will have to earn their confidence. Meanwhile 
Joe Wheeler's Mickey Mouse team will play in 
Orlando where it will blend in perfectly with the 
environment. 



*****A * * O i 



WHEN JOHN POTTER first sunk his sand fences 
into the Atlantic Ocean off the beach between 17th 
and 20th Streets, city officials were quietly sure 
that the erosion control device would not work. 
Nevertheless, the City Council had gone against the 
advice of the Virginia Beach Erodon Commission, 
the Army Corps of Engineers and the city staff and 
approved a contract with Mr. Potter obligating the 
city to pay $25,000 if a one-foot buildup of sand was 
achieved. If the buildup should continue and reach 
two feet, then the city would pay the full $108,000 
called for in the contract. 

Meanwhile, the Erosion Commission had pumped 
100,000 cubic yards of sand into the beach at 16th 
Street since last June. According to Community 
Services Director W.W. Fleming, this is responsible 
for the buildiq) of sand in the area, not Mr. Potter's 
fence. 

So it appears that Beach taxpayers are stuck with 
a tab for at least $S,000 and perhaps $108,000 for 
something they probably \yould have had in the first 
place. Engineers say we'll never know. 



How to subscribe 




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HASSLES 

By 

Donna 

Hendrick 

Defrosting Job 
l^ves me cold 



The messiest, drippiest, yuckiest chore in the 
world has to be defrosting the refrigerator. 

Appliance manufacturers realize this. That's why 
they came out with frost-free refrigerators, surely 
one of the greatest inventions of humankind, 
ranked right up there with the self-cleaning oven. 

I read somewhere recently that refrigerators 
shwld be defrosted when the ice in the freezer 
compartment builds up to a quarter-inch thickness. 
Unfortunately, I read it after the ice in my freezer 
was already an inch thick. 

THIS LEFT ROOM for two of the three ice trays I 
own and nothing else. Frozen orange juice had to be 
thaw^ and mixed as soon as it came home from 
the st(M'e because there was no way to squeeze it 
into the freezer. "^ 

Ice cream had to be consumed immediately after 
purchase. A half-gallon of ice cream is just the right 
size if you have a lot of friends to help eat it, but did 
you ever try eating a half-gallon by yourself 
because the darn thing won't fit into the freezer? 
That's a good way to gain five pounds. 

The real clincher forcing me to defrost the 
freezer was the freezer door— it wouldn't close. 
There was just too much ice built up. 

WHEN THE FREEZER door won't close, it 
starts getting warm in there. And the warmer it 
gets, the harder the refrigerator works trying to 
keep it cold. And the harder it works, the higher the 
Vepco bill is at the end of the month. 

The refrigerator should be defrosted when there 
is very little or no food in it. This is easier said than 
done. One could palm off food on the neighbors with 
an approach like, "Hey, don't you need three eggs, 
four slices of cheese and a half -gallon of milk?" 

With the price of food these days, it might be 
better to con the neighbors into letting you keep the 
three eggs, four slices of cheese and half gallon of 
milk in their refrigerator only tempOTarily until 
your is cold again. 

OR YOU COULD dump all the food in the sink and 
load ice cubes on top of it. The ice cubes are going to 
melt anyway while the refrigerator is defrosting, 
unfortunately, >this results in soggy cheese and 
butto-, but at least it's cold soggy cheese and 
butter. 

After all the food is out of the refrigerator, one 
should unplug the thing and leave the door open. I 
don't think this is the recommended. method, but 
it's much speedier than turning the control knob to 
defrost, believe me. 

Then comes the really fun part. You have to be on 
your toes to keep the drip tray tinder the freezer 
from overflowing. Check the drip tray every few 
muiutes or so. Dump thedrip tray in the sink. But a 
word of caution: Don't dump the drip tray in the 
sii^ unless you have a divided sink because you'll 
be chimping defrosted ice on your already soggy 
butter and che^e. 

IN BETWEEN VISITS to ttie drip tray, one could 
watch TV or listen to the radio or read, but this is a 
little difficult because your train of thought will 
constantly be interrupted by sounds of crashes and 
avalanches coming from tiie refrigerator. That's 
the giant slate of ice lo(»ening enough to fall. 

Another word of caution : Approach the vicinity of 
the refrigerator with care. The kitehen floor in the 
area will be wet and slippery because no one, not 
ev6n the great European balancing teams, can 
balance a drip tray from refrigerator to sink 
without spilling most of it on the floor. 

After all the ice has crashed and dripped its 
meiry way to oblivion, wipe the inside of the 
refrigerator with a solution of baking soda and 
water. Wipe aU the trays, racks and conipartments. 
It will smell so nice. 

Then wipe the soggy food and restore it to its 
proper jdaoe. Then fill the ice trays and rejoice over 
the freezer door that closes once again. 

Then open a savii^ account and start saving^fof 
that fto-hassle frost-free refrigerator. 



foce/ 



b||U*4o 





John Atkinson flashes a skeptical 
smile as he listens to a political 
speech during a candidate forum at 
Tidewater Community College dur- 
ing the Beach City Council race, 
Mr. Atkinson, who filed in the at- 



large race, might have tired of all 
the political jargon. He withdrew 
as a candidate midway in the cam- 
paign'^-^^iting unfdrseen business 
committments. 



Beach 
to get 

roads 

mbney 



The SUte Highway 
Commission has tentatively 
approved 14-925 million for 
Virginia Beach in highway 
Ainds for fiscal year 1974-75. 
Some of the funds are 
supplementary allocations for 
highway construction projects 
already underway, while other 
fUnds are initial allocations for 
new projects. 

Not included in the $4.9 
million tentative allocation 
figure is a $30,114,638 allocation 
for Bowers Hill (Route 264) 
improvements which will 
include sections of Chesapeake, 
Virginia Beach, Norfolk, 
Hampton, Newport News, York 
and James City. 

Supplementary allocations 
for projects already underway 
include: 

• Princess Anne Road from 
Newtown Road to Parliament 
Drive (1500,000); 

• Virginia Beach Boulevard 
from the west cwporate limits 
to Farmington Road ($1 
million) ; 

• Rosemont Road from 
Holland Road to Virginia Beach 
Boulevard ($300,000); 

• Great Neck Road from 
Virginia Beach Boulevard to 
north of First Colonial Road 
($1.5 million) ; 

• Indian River Road from 
the corporate limits to Route 64 
($500,000); 

• Birdneck Road from 
Laskin Road to SouUtern 
Boulevard ($425,000). 

Initial allocations for new 
projects include: 

• Newtown and Haygood 
Roads from Virginia Beach 
Boulevard to Independence 
Boulevard, four lanes divided 
($100,000); 

• Qreat Neck Road from 
north of First Colonial Road to 
Shore Drive, four lanes 
($500,000); 

• Witchduck Road from the 
Virginia Beach — Norfolk 
Expressway to Pembroke 
Boulevard, four lanes divided 
($100,000). 

Filial approval of ttie funds 
wUl not come ur^il after public 
hearini^ in June. 

Funds come from Uie federal 
Highway Trust Fund and 
revenue expected from the state 
motor fuel tax and oUier state 
road-use jaxes. 



The Son-Wednesday, May 22. 1974-Pa9e A-3 




An EqMl Opportunity Employtr 



Who makes house calls 

anymore? 



"Why bother? " some people ask. In an 
age when the house call has almost 
disappeared from American life, why do 
we bother to make them? The answer is 
simple. More people depend on the 
telephone t(xlay for nnore things than 
ever before. We simply can't afford to 



let it break down. That's why if your 
telephone ever does break down, no 
matter what the reason, we'll come fix 
it free. We know what a serious inconve- 
nience an out-of-service telephone can 
be, and that's why we bother. 
Because it matter^, to us and to you. 




^ HrstColony 
Telephone CompcNiy 

A Mamtjer of Cortinentanel^phone System 



«59» 



^ 





f^ COMER 

PVLE 



'^^] 



5:30 PM 



WEEKDAYS 





THE 700 
CUffi 




THE 



W^KDAYS 8 PM 



BOLD ONES 



t**" 




weekdays 11 PM 



MM 



Features 



Page A4-Tha Sun-Wednesday, May 22, 1974 



False eyelash job 
^unglues^ real lash 




z ■ 



"Oh, those marvelous, semipermanent 
false eyelashes," gushied the beauty 
magazines. No more fussing with messy, 
unwieldy lashes on a strip. 

Just put yourself in the hands of a super 
beauty operator who for a mere $30 or so 
would attach individual false eyelashes one by 
one, neatly spaced among yair very own, to 
give you thick, luxuriant, natural-lodcing 
lashes. Lashes that would not fall off, {Hill off, 
wash off, or swim off; lashes that would be all 
yours for all of three to four weeks, when they 
would gently drop out on signal and you 
simply come in to the salon for a relash job. 
Voila, now every woman could have eyes like 
Elizabeth Taylor. 

WELL, IT was enough to stir fantasies even 
in my liberated heart. Fortunately, I'm from 
that class of women who always have other 
things to do with $30. 

Because what the beauty magazines aren't 
reporting is that women who invest in this 
beauty service risk losing not only their 
money, but their natural eyelashes as weU^ 
And conceivably even their eyesight, /f 

The best cosmetic job of the year is the 
coverup of the complaints from women whose 
own lashes fell out when the artificial ones 
went (sometimes in a matter of days). This is 
caused by the glue, which in order to keep the 

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All Name Brand Ladies Wear 

FACTORY FRESH LATEST STYLE 

YOUR CUSTOMERS 
SAVE UP TO 50% 

COMPLETE INVENTORY 

BEAUTIFUL REDWOOD FIXTURES 
COMPLETE TRAINING PROGRAM 

VISIT OUR STORES 

TALK TO OUR OWNERS 
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INVESTMENT - $12,500. 

OTHER CHOICE AREAS AVAILABLE 
CALL COLLECT MR. TODD 904-396-1707 
Or Write: 

HY-STYLE SHOPPE 

p. 0. Box 26009 
Jacksonville, Florida 32218 



n 



ersatz laslKS cemeted to the real ones, has to 
dry hard in a tight moisture-pro<rf seal. Any 
glue which can do this is also capablie of 
shriveling your own lashes. (Accooding to 
opthalmologists the only safe glue for the eye 
area is surgical glue, y^hich is neither 
waterproof nor permanent.) 

EYELASHES will generally grow back, but 
if the glue gets on the lid or into the eyes, 
serious irritations or permanent injury can 
result. To make matters worse, epoxy glue is 
sometimes used to attach these iiKiivichial 
lashes. Epoxy glue is what holds the tiles to 
your bathroom walls and if you want to know 
how good it is for your eyes, pick up a tube at 
your hardware store and read the warnings on 
the label. 

To find out what an unsuspecting woman is 
likely to be told should she want these lashes, I 
called ten of the most prestigious beauty 
salons in New York City trying to sound like a 
n^e lady of leisure. I was assured that the 
process was absolutely safe and that my own 
lashes would definitely not fall out by Charles 
of the Ritz, Elizabeth Arden, and the salons of) 
Bergdorf Goodman, Saks Fifth Avenue, 
Bonwit Teller, A. Altmann, Franklin Simon 
(stores where you can pick up $300 afternoon 
dresses). 



BERGDORF'S did admit that there have 
been some complaints like rashes and 
swelling of the eyelids from "a few women 
who may be allergic." 

The salons at Lord & Taylor and Henri 
Bendel (the chicest shop in town) simply said 
they didn't do ttie process but wouldn't say 
why. Kenneth's, however (Kenneth became 
famous as Jackie Kennedy's hairdresser and 
his salon is the most prestigious in the 
country) told me why: "The glue is not sup- 
posed to be good for your own lashes. Mr. 
Kenneth doesn't allow it." 

Surprisingly (or perhaps not so) the 
medical establishment isn't making a lot of 
noise. The AMA> (whom I contacted as a 
journalist) declined to elaborate on the item in 
"Today's Health." And one <rf the leading 
opthalmologists in New York City refused to 
be quoted on a warning to women. "Why be an 
alarmist?" he said. 

The casualties to date |iave been light 
because the process is limited to women who 
can afford the $30 and who live in major 
metropolitan areas. But some enterprising 
beauty merchants are now marketing dfo-it- 
yourself versions of semipermanent lashes 
which will be sold throughout the country for 
about $3 per kit. 

Just one more service from America's 
beauty hucksters. 



I Saving a 
I tree by 
I recyciing 



i C&P Telephone Co. is | 
1 helping collect old § 
p telephone directories ^ 
P for recycling to help the ^, 
^Suburban Junior*^* 
1 Woman's Club with its 
I "Save a Tree" con- 
g servation project. 
g Telephone directories ^ 
may be taken to the ^j 
Military Circle offiqfe (rf g^ 
C&P Telephone or can § 
I be sent to school with :§ 
any public school §; 
student in Virginia % 
Beach before Tuesday. 




Pacific South could be 
your home adjf ress this summer. 



Lots of people are buying b^ch 
condominium homes. 

But only a very Jew, very smart 
people will actually be living in 
their new homes this summer. 
You could becpe of them. 
. And you PDuld be spending 
less. Because Pacific South 
offers unlimited luxury at the 
lowest cost per square foot of 
living space. Check pric^. You 
won't be able to duplicate the 
$31,900 to SS4.7gO price range 
available at Pacific South. 

Think about it. Better still, 
come see the condominium homes 
complete and ready for your 



inspection at Pacific South. 
Check room sizes. Compare floor 
plans. Marvel at the view from 
oceanfront picture windows. 

But don't wait too long. Three 
out of four of all our home units 
already belong to'someone. 

04CIFC SOUTH 

.5fh and Pacific Avenues 
Virginia Beach 

Sal«s offices and model unite 

open on premises. 

Evay Day 

10 i.m. to 6 pan. 



ACIOSS 

1. Fishhonk 

fnturr 
i. Replie*« 

11. Triet 

12. Waxy (lower 
U. Vind 

I.S. Across ground 
rather than by 
sea 

16. Very shortly: 
3 wds. 

18. Mr. Sorenscn, 
to his friends 

19. Refusal 

Zfl. Ex-soldirn 

21. Roomy 

22. Girdle 

23. SincinK group 

24. Hair-rafsinf 

26. Cut of meat, 
with backbone 

27. Equine sound 

28. Couple 

29. — out, fail 
suddenly 
Blackbird 
"A — may 
look on a king" 
Fabled bird 

35. GiTc tit for Ut 
37. Before-mcal 
drink 

39. Lifht anack 

40. Reflect; musa 

41. Shah's land 

42. Wine and dine 

43. Flat-bottomed 
boat 



DOWN 

1. Sink 

2. Sphere of 
conflict 
Receive and 
pass on 
HealinK oil 
Talk-show 
host, Dirk — 
Portents 
Impudent 
Badly 
Great joy 
For an 
indeflnite 
time : 2 wds. 

12. Good-'ookinit 

13. Viper 
17. Manifest 

21. Butzinir sound 



22. Speak sharply 

23. Shivery 
feelinf 

24. Noay parker 
26. Acknowledge 

26. Water bottle 

27. Go away!: 

ilang 

28. — bourgeoisie 

30. Smeltery 
product 

31. City on the 
Nile 

32. Perfume haae 

33. Minute 

35. Misa 
Hay worth 

36. In the same 
place: abbr. 

.W. Equipment 



30. 
31. 



34 



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Solution on page B-6 



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HOROSCOPE 



From 

May22 

to May 28 

ARfES: (Mwdl U t« AfrU 
II - Abe Arki AieeadHt) - 
Let othen dilM — take a 
tackground poritton and con- 
template recent eventa. Use 
your cre^twewiginaUty and 
artistic aUUties on new pro}- 
ecta in planning stage. Iii»ne 
environment may need re- 
pairs. 

TAURUS: (April M ie May 
21 — Alse Tanras Aseeadant) 

— You can take five now and 
get same much needed rest 
Good time to redecorate 0ie 
home with bright colors. For 
single Taureans, romance is 
in the air. Also a good time to 
acquire a househ(dd pet. 

GEMINI: (May 21 to June 

21 — Also Gemini Ascendant) 

— Call on past eiperience in 
canrfully making a decision. 
Writii^ conmiunicatians. re- 
lationdiips witti ckMe Un, 
should receive close attention. 
Use caution in financial 
areas, investments and budg- 
et. 

CANCER: (June 21 to July 

22 — Also (lancer Ascendant) 

— Avoid open coi^ct with 
boss or superiors. Resist im- 
pulsive actions — look for 
hidden factors, work behind 
the scenes. CVnoentrate en 



projects in propvas and all 
routine matters. Check home 
insurance. 

UX): (July n (e AnfBst 12 
— Also Lee Asceadkurt) — 
Early in the wedc to the time 
for action — ttien take a more 
retiring positkn. Check over 
budget, househdd accounts, 
bank statements for possible 
errors. A new friend nuqr 
stimulate interest in study 



change of pace- 
ity. 



lae creativ- 



VIRGO: ( Aifust 2S te Sept. 
22 -Also ^e Aseeadant) - 
Sow down — take an easier 
pace this wedt. Good time for 
vacatidn if possible. Res^ re- 
lax, and ofaaerve speed laws 
when driving. Ideas {(or^addi- 
tional irttiAes, inqroving ol 
job ddlls, are good but may 
have to wait a irtiile — be pa- 
tient. 

LQHU: (8e[^ 23 te Od. 22 
— Also libra Aseeadant) — 
Work demands, obligations 
may weigh heavy on you now. 
Resist egocentric actions 
irtikrh coukl Jeopardise secu- 
rity. Make compromises. De- 
lay travel if prasible — use 
care in transit Be logical and 
practical. 



SCORPIO: (Oct 23 to Nov. 
21 — Also Scorpio Ascendant) 
— Concentrate on the details 
and plans of a project to be 
launched soon. Resist nega- 
tive attitudes and pessimistic 
outlook. Get involved with 
community affairs for a 



SAGITTARIUS: (Nov. 22 to 
Oe^. 21 - Also SagittariBS As- 
ceadaat) — Make ezdtii« 
plaAs for your upcoming va- 
cation. Marital problems 
could bedue to your excessive 
domineering attttudes — ifiw 
it some thought. Social life 
sparides wiUi home entertain- 
ment Mcented. 

CAPRICORN: (Dee. 22 te 
Jaa. It - Also Capricon As- 
eeadant) — Do some inner 
self setfcMng and nuke die 
changes required. Old proj- 
ects may need rewoiktag. 
Your ouUook may be some- 
what gloomy now, so delay ' 
in^ortant decisions If possi- ' 
ble. Assess budget 



AQUARIUS: (Jan. 2> te 
Feb. U - Abo Aqnariai As- 
oeadut) — You may be 
changing your philosophy 
someiHiat Ttavel is a possi- 
bility. Opportisdty abounds — 
be alert Friend's ideas, mes- 
sa^ are important so study 
diem. Finances, career, home 
all accented. 

PISCES: (Feb. If to March 
21 — Abe Pbces Ascendant) 
— Be patient in the face of 
frustrating circumstances. 
Your foundations could be 
tested now for solidarity. 
Posl^xme important dedsfons 
if possible — you tend to feel 
confused now. C^ontrol your 



Strict 
Personal 



1* 

Love and coffee: Instant 
is not like the real thing . 



By PAT and 
MARILYN DAVIS 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

I met Howard at a party 
and it was love at first sight. 
I just Icn^w this was the man 
for me. The problem is that 
he's married. I know by the 
way he looked at me that he 
was interested. Should I try 
to date Howard? I just can't 
get him off my mind. 

Vicky 
Dear Vicky: 

Instant love like instant 
coffee is not the real thing. 
Forget Howard and date 
only single males. 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

Perhaps this will help 
some other girl. It is too 
late for me. You see, 
I'm pregnant and not 
married. I was foolish 
enough to let Ed move into 
my apartment. He said we 
would get married just as 
soon as he had a few bills 
paid, When the bills were 
almost paid, Ed bought a 
new car. Then the excuse 
was, "Wait til I pay off the 
car." 

The unhappy ending is 
that when Ed discovered I 



was pregnant, he moved out 
and hasn't called since. I 
can't believe he would leave 
me with no money and 
pregnant, but he did. 

Deserted 



Dear Deserted: 

If you can't afford a 
lawyer, contact Legal Aid. 
They can advise you 
regarding Ed's respon- 
sibility. You can't undo the 
past, but you can learn a 
valuable lesson. 



Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

I feel like I'm in jail since 
I started going steady about 
two months ago. Jack insists 
on seeing me every minute 
of the day. I'm losing all my 
girl friends and never have 
time to shop or do anything 
for myself. I'm the type of 
person who needs some time 
alone. I'm beginning to feel 
suffocated. How can I get 
out of this situation? 

Linda, age 16 

Dear Linda: 

Simply tell Jadi you've 
changed your mind. It's a 



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woman's privilege y(*i 
know. The longer yoti" 
postpone making a decision 
the harder it is. ' 

Your letter is another 
strong indication that going 
steady is not always the 
wisest way to go. Beir^ 
glued to another, like a 
stamp to a letter, is just n6t 
as glamorous as it is 
depicted. At your age, you 
should circulate so that you 
will really know Mr. Rigbt 
when he comes along. 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

I believe that home is 
where you let your hair 
down and relax, but my 
mother complains about a 
lot (A small things— leaving 
the ice cubes in the sink, 
Ixx^s on the table, or a glass 
left on the TV. 

How can I convince her 
that home is the place to 
relax? 



Jay 



Dear Jay: 

You better check on your 
home IQ. Sure, home is a 
place to relax but aren't you 
overdoing it a bit? What 
al}out the work you are 
creating for others? 

Keep in niind that 
som«)ne has to clean t^ 
house, pick up glasses, and 
fill the ice cube trays. I'm 
sure you can realize that it is 
important to keep yoiir 
habits in check so that you 
are not itfhringing on the 
rights of others. 



Sirktiy Pmonttl witt he glad \o 
consider your question. Write: Ht 
and Marilyn Davis, Virginia Be^ 
Sun, 138 Rosemont Road, Mh 
ginia Beach. Va.. 23452. 



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The Sun-Wedn«day, May 22, 1974-Pagt A<6 



Fruitful 
trees need 

other trees 



Q. My apple tree blooms good every 
year, but fails to produce any fruit. 
What's wrong? 

A. With the exception of Golden 
Delicious, most apple varieties are self 
Qnfruitful, This means they will not set 
firuit with their own pollen. To obtain good 
fruit set, plant another apple variety 
close by. 




questions & answers about lawns & gardens 



Q. When is the best time to spray to 
minimize bee kill? 

A. Most bees are active from mid- 
morning to mid-afternoon. Avoid 
spraying between 10 d.m. and 2 p.m., if at 
all possible. 

Q. Aphids are becoming a problem on 
my leaf lettuce. What can be d(toe? 

A. The safest means for you would be to 
thoroughly wash the lettuce leaves before 
using. Ehisting with 5 per cent malathion 
will control aphids, but you must wait two 
weeks before you can use the lettuce. 

Q. Can an application of Sevin damage 
plant matmal? 

A. Injury to tender foliage may occur if 
plants are wet when treated or in the 
presence of high humidity. 

Q. There Ls a cottray type of growth on 
the underside of my silver maple leaves. 
What is it? 

A. This sound like cottony maple scale 
which attacks silver maples. The insect 
itself is brown and the white masses are 
^g sacks. Spraying with malathion 
should control this insect. 



HoiUiu wUI be glad to answer your questioni about lawnt and 
gardeni Send your question! to HoMne. Virginia Beach Sun, 
138 Rotemont Road, Virginia Beach. Va. 2345Z 



Plan now for fall oops 



To secure the maximum of 
{deasure and value from your 
vegetal^ garden, you should 
continue planting durii^ Uie 
summer. This will provide 
crops to harvest during the fall 
and until cold weather kills even 
your hardiest plants. 

Planning the fall garden is 
easy. All you need to do is 
determine the number of days 
required for your vegetables to 
mature after they are planted. 
You can get this information 
from a seed catalog, w from 
VPl I^blication 44, "Vegetable 
Gardening in Virgiiua". 

THKN, make your plantings far 
enou^ ahead of the average 
fall frost date to allow the 
vegetables to mature before 
they are killed by cold. The 
average date of the first frost in 



Virginia Beach is Nov. 10. 

As an example, most snap 
bean varieties require about S4 
days from {Anting to maturity. 
Ther^(»^ you may plant snap 
beans as late as about the first 
week in September. You may 
want to allow an extra wedc or 
two, to be sure an early frost 
does not kill your crop. 

Or consider early ripening 
sweet corn which requires 
about 66 days. You may plant 
eariy cwn as l^te as about the 
last week in July and still 
secure a crop. Tomatoes and 
white potatoes can be planted in 
early July. 

IN MOST cases the early 
maturing varieties of 
vegetables should be selected 
f(H- the fall garden. These may 
be planted after your early 



Garden club 
news and notes 



THE COUNCIL of Garden 
Clubs of Virginia Beach will 
hold its annual council awards 
luncheon May 29 at the Mariner 
Restaurant, 57th Street and 
Oceanfront. Buffet luncheon is 
$4.35 per person. 

A SUPER garage sale 
sponsored by the Tidewater 
District, Virginia Federation of 
Garden Clubs, will be Saturday 
(9a.m. -5 p.m.) at 2712 E. Kings 
Road, Chesopeian Colony. 



THE ANNUAL spring awards 
luncheon of the King's Grant 
Garden Club was held recently 
at the Three Ships Inn. Mrs. 
Frederic Howe Jr. won the 
artistic and horticulture 
awards. New officers installed 
are: president, Mrs. Leo 
Simon; first vice-president, 
Mrs. CM. Phillips; second vice- 
presklent, Mrs. E.J. Parker; 
secretary, Mrs. Roger Ashley, 
and treasurer, Mrs. Rush 
Smith. 



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summer varieties have been 
harvested and still be ready to 
pick before freezing weather. 

Some of the hardy, cool 
season crops will have better 
quality when they mature in the 
fall than during hot summer 
weather. Also, they will 
continue to grow during the 
warm autumn weather which 
may follow the first frost which 
will kill tender vegetables. 

Broccoli, cabbage, and 
coUards should be planted about 
10 weeks bef(»-e the expected 
first frost. Other excellent fall 
vegetables which should be 
planted about eight weeks 



before the frost date are beets, 
cauliflower, chard, kale, 
kohlrabi; peas and turnips. 

AS WE NKAR the end of 
summer, lettuce and spinach 
may be planted about six weeks 
befwe frost date, and mustard 
and radish about two weeks 
later. With all these vegetables 
to select from, you can harvest 
healthful crops until freezing 
weather kills even your hardy 
plante. 

The most serious problem you 
may have in connection with 
your fall garden is the 
germination of seeds in dry soil, 
to eliminate this difficulty, wet 
the ground thoroughly the day 
before you plan to |dant. 

After you have planted your 
seeds and covered them with 
soil in the usual way, spread a 
six-inch band of sawdust or 
vermiculite one-half inch thick 
along the row. This will help 
conserve soil moisture and 
prevent crusting of the sdl. 

If the weather remains dry, 
use a sprinkling can or hose 
with a fine spray nozzle to apply 
water along the row. 




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Page A-6-The Sun-Wedneiday, May 22, 1974 



Bayside takes Eastern District cmwn 



It 

u 



» 

* 

»,. 
*' 
i 
ii 



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I* 
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It 
*»■•. 



By JOHN BANNON 
Sports Editor 

Streaks always come to an end in the world of 
sports. Kempsville, the only team in the histwy of 
Virginia high school baseball to win back to back 
state championships, saw their chance at record 
Uiird consecutive crown vanish. 

Bayside saw to that with a surprisingly easy 6-2 
playoff victory Thursday at Lake Taylor befMv 400 
fang to take the 1974 Eastern District tiUe. Kemp- 
sville had forced the playoff, catching Bayside on 
the final day of the' season with their seventh suc- 
cessive district win. Both teams finished the league 
season with 8-2 records. Bayside's losses coming at 
Uie hands of Kellam and Lake Taylor, while 
Kempsville dropped early season encounters to the 
Marlins and city rival Cox. 

The Marlins used some timely two-out hitting, 
excellent pitching and the ability to capatalize on 
Chief mistakes to take the win, the title and propel 
Bayside into the Eastern Regional playoffs. 

THE MARLINS, following a season-long pattern 
jumped to a commanding lead. "The Maury game 
was the only game where we had to come from 
behind in. All the others we jumped ahead right at 
the start," said Bayside Coach Terry Morton. 

The Marlins reached Kempsville starter Bobby 
Harrison in the top of the first. Centerfielder Joe 
Osborne started the rally, working Harrison for a 
one-out walk;\;!raig Wiesner followed with a long 
drive to right center. Harrison got a break when 
Wiesner's liner bounced over the fence for a ground 
rule double, stopping Osborne at third and 
preventing a siire run. 

The Kempsville pitcher, working with only two 
days rest, seemed on the verge of escaping the jam 
when he retired Marty Moore on strikes for the 
second out of the frame. 

Sophomore catcher Roy Lohman, who had done 
little damage at the plate all season, delivered the 
biggest hit of the campaign. Lohman put the 
Marlins on top with a soft line single just out of the 
reach of Chief third baseman Steve Hanson. The hit 
produced a 2-0 Marlin advantage. 

HARRISON RETIRED Stan Tarkenton on 
strikes to end the rally, but despite striking out the 
side Harrison had dug a hole the Chiefs never 
climbed out of. 

Struggling in the opening frame, the roof fell in 
on Harrison in the second inning as Kempsville's 
usually brilliant fielding betrayed them. 

Leftfielder George Tyner, breaking out of a 
recent slump, opened the second inning with a lead- 
off ground rule double. Harrison steadied retiring 
the next two batters without the ball leaving the 
infield. 

Bayside started their two-out magic once again 
and Harrison never escaped the second inning. A 
walk to Richard Kiger signalled the end of the Chief 
southpaw as Coach Ray Barlow pulled his starter in 
favor of Jimmy Moore. 

MOORE. WHO had forced the playoff with a 
complete game win over Princess Anne two days 



v 




A l^JMMIT meetfaig at the mound as 
l^i^viUe Coach Ray Barlow (right), his 
pitcher Bobby Harrison (left) and catcher 
Jerry Grain discuss pitching strategy in the 
second inning of the Bayside game. The 
discussimi failed to accomplish its motive 
as Barlow had to return later in the imiing to 
jull his pitcher. (Sun photo by Neal Sims) 




to be honored 
at sports club 

T»» 1974 Sun All-City baseball team will be m- 
wited at the TXiesday meeting of The Virginia 
^mh Sports Club at the Ocean Hearth. Old 
Dominion University basetoll coach Bud Metheny 
will be tiK f^itured speaker . 

Tl» tei man team was selected on a vote of The 
Sun ^wta staff ami will af^ar in next we^'s 




BAYSIDE'S MARTY Moore fouls off a pitch 
in action Thursday in the Eastern District 
playoff game at Lake Taylor. Moore did 
most of his damage from the mound. 

before, seemed to have restored order to the 
crumbling Kempsville forces, getting Osborne to 
beat a seeming inning-ending groundball to third 
baseman Hanson. The Chief fielder came up with 
the bouncer cleanly but his wide throw enabled 
Tyner to come home with the third Bayside run as 
Kiger and Osborne scampered into scoring 
position. 

A visibly perturbed Moore yielded a two-run 
single to Wiesner, who ended up at second when 
catcher Jerry Grain committed another of the 
Chief's mounting miscues with an overthrow. The 
Chiefs closed the door on themselves with Hanson's 
second error of the inning on a Marty Moore 
grounder, enabling Wiesner to score with the 
Marlin's sixth run. 

Kempsville's Moore kept the Marlins in check 
for the rest of the afternoon, allowing only two 
baserunners to get as far as second base over the 
final five innings. 

The damage was done though by the Marlins 
timely hitting and the four Kempsville miscues in 
the telMale second frame. Moore pitching with only 
one day of rest showed remarkable stamina, 
striking out five batters in his five and two-third 
inning relief stint. 

MOORE'S EFFORT PALED in light of the 
brilliant performance of the Bayside duo of Moore 
and Wiesner. The Chiefs managed only three hits, 
all singles. In only one inning, the fourth, did 
Kempsville have more than one base-runner. 

Bayside's Moore was overpowering in the 
opening innings of his starting role. Finding the 
strike zone with great regularity, Moore yielded 



pitching four strong innings to notch the 
title clinching victory. (Sun photo by Neal 
Sims) 



only a second-inning single to Mark O'Hara over 
the first three frames. 

Kempsville finally solved Moore's offerings in 
the bottom of the fourth inning, turning two singles 
a base on balls and two stolen bases into their 

only two runs of the contest. 

"I told Marty to go out there and throw as hard 
as he could for four innings. I figured if we could get 
four good innings out of him we would be in pretty 
good shape," said Morton. Moore did his job and 
according to the prearranged plan Wiesner came 
on in the fifth in relief. 

THE PREMIER southpaw in the Beach left little 
doubt that Kempsville would not recover from the 
6-2 deficit. From the moment Wiesner let fly with 
his blazing fastball, Kempsville's reign as district 
baseball king became a fleeting memory. 

Wiesner was the most impressive pitcher on 
display at Lake Taylor on the warm afternoon. The 
Bayside senior retired all nine Chiefs he faced with 
oi^ one ball leaving the infield. WieSner recorded 
four strikeouts in saving the win for teammate 
Moore. 

The defending state champions lost their claim 
to the crown as Wiesner toyed with them over the 
final innings. Centerfielder Frank Welch had the 
misfortune of committing the last Kempsville out of 
the season, bouncing harmlessly back to Wiesner. 

"1 was kind of disappointed when it ended. It 
was really alot of fun. We weren't even suppossed to 
be in it and we won it so easily," said an elated 
Morton. 

For Bayside, that was what the game was — fun. 
For Kempsville, it was the end. 







« 



i 



KEMPSVILLE'S JIMMY Moore walks 
away from the plate with disgust written mi 
his face. Bayside's Craig Wiesner had just 
r^ired Moore on a called thiitl strike in the 



bottom fd the sixth InnlRg as time was 
running out on the defending state 
champion Chiefs. (Sun photo by Neal Sims) 



i 

i 



SIDEUNIS 

Join 

NIMOII 

Sporti Editor 




Jefferson bumps 
local coaches 

Washing^ton Redskin Roy Jefferson did not set 
the world on fire with his golfing during the recent 
Redskins "Remember Lombard! Weekend." The 
All-Pro receiver did raise the ire of a few coach^ 
with one of his comments. 

After participating in an exhibition basketball 
game with fellow Redskins against some local high 
school basketball talent, Jefferson was full of 
praise for the talented youngsters. He also was 
aghast that some of the players had not received 
college scholarships. The burden for this un- 
fortunate circumstance Jefferson tried to place on 
the player's coaches, claiming all coaches cared 
about was their won loss record. 

Jefferson's judgement would seem to be a bit 
rash. 

"1 DON'T consider my job done until I get my 
players into school. I don't think my obligation to 
the players stops at the end of the season," says 
Kellam head football coach Johnny Cooke. "The 
players worked hard for me during the season, and 
I feel I owe it to them to work equally hard at get- 
ting them into school." 

The past high school football season was laced 
with success for Kallam and Co(*e. The Knights 
awarded their coach with his first winning season 
as a head coach. Kellam set a school record with a 
nine-game winning streak, finishing with a 9-1 
record and the second highest point-rating in the 
Eastern Region. 

"I was proud of how the boys played during the 
season," said Go<*e. "After the season ended I sat _ 
back and waited for the offers to come in." 

IT WAS A lonely wait for Cooke as college scouts, 
seeking his ballplayers were a scarce commodity. 
At this juncture no senior on the Kellam'squad has 
received a college scholarship. 

"1 really can't understand it. A team does not go 
9-1 without having some good ballplayers," con- 
tends the Kellam leader. "I would really 
like to know how college scouts 
determine wblo is a (fbllege prospect 
because I feel there were some kids on this team 
who can play college football." 

Codec soon tir^ of waiting for the scouts to ccxne 
to him. He went on an offensive, bringing the war to 
the colleges armed with statistics both football and 
academic. "I just started calling and writing to all 
the coaches I know," said Co(Ae. 

Cooke's efforts were fruitless. "It's kind of 
depressing. I've got college coaches, coming 
around to see me about prospects for next year, and 
here I'm still trying to get kids into school, who are 
going to graduate in June," comments Cooke. "I 
haven't given up yet though. I've got a group of 
players visiting a school this weekend." 

COOKE IS not alone in his battle to convince 
college coaches of players potential. The new 30- 
scholarship limit imposed by the NCAA on its 
members this past recruiting season has made the 
competition between high school players for grants 
even more fierce. "There is no doubt the 30 rule has 
hurt the high school player," Claims Cooke. 

It has not been a banner year for signings 
throughout the Beach. Of the 30 seniors selected on 
the coaches all-city team, only eight have been 
thought worthy enough by college scouts of 
receivingascholarshiptoplay football. "Everyone is 
interested In the blue chip prospects," claims 
retiring Bayside Coach Bob Hicks. "No one is 
willing to take a chance on a marginal player , 
anymore." 

On the basketball front the story is no rosier. 
Bayside's Elton Gross is the only member of the 
ten-team all-city team to sign a grant. 

There are numerous reasons for the lack of local 
signings. One of them however is not the lack of 
effort on the part of the Beach coaches. 

The NFL recently outlawed the bump and run. 
Jefferson would be wise in the future to follow that 
thought and avoid cheap shots. 

I Athlete of | 
i thfiWeek 



fi^^ 



Craig 
Wiesner 

Bayside 




Baysi(te's Craig Wiesner is the final 
selection of this spring season as Virginia 
Beach hi^ school player of the week. 

Wiesner was a key performer in Bayside's 6- 
2 Eastern District playoff victory over 
defending state champion Kempsville. Tte 
talents senior went three for four at the plate 
with two rui^ scored. He abo cam^ on in relief 
of starter Marty Moore to 'save his 
teammate's victory with three innings of 
scorele^ no-hit relirf. 

An mjtstandii^ athlete was honored weekly 
by The Sun throughoit the high school sprii^ 
spM^ sea«m. ^ 



I 






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m-m'm^t^i.-t,^. 



The Sun— Wednesday, May 22, 1974-Pa9e A-7 



.vv......mb™...^^«^..^^.. The Sun— Wednesday, May 22, ] 

Bayside's Morton blooms in the spring 



'u» 




V. 



COACH TERRY Morton ponders strategy from 
nis third base coaching station, in a game 
against Boolcer T. Washington. Accwding to 
Morton, a coach has more ccmtrol over the 
action in baseball than in any other sport. (Sun 
photo by Rod Mann) 



ByJOHNBANNON 
Sports Editor 

It has been a great spring for Baysi<te's Terry 
Morton. 

First, Morton was appointed to fill the head 
football coaching vacancy at Bayside caused by the 
r^irement of Bob Hicks. Second, Morton's players 
delivered an Eastern District championship in his 
first year as a head varsity baseball coach with a 6- 
2 win over Kempsville last Thursday at Lake 
Taylor. 

Morton will retire from the baseball coaching 
lines with a district title in his only year as a head 
coach. School rules prohibit Morton from being a 
head coach in two major sports. 

HIS OVERWHELMING success in his opening 
year came as a surprise to the 27-year old 
Morton. "At the start of the season, I never really 
expected it. The kids really played well. Everything 
fell into place for us," said Morton. 

The season did bring some disappointment to 
Morton, who piloted the Bayside junior varsity 
baseball team to a league title with a 9-1 mark in 
1973. "I really expected it to be a whole lot different 
from the junior varsity, but there isn't that much of 
difference between the two. The kids are a little bit 
older but that's about all," stated Morton. 

Morton is not a killjoy. Winning a district title Is 
not something that slips by unnoticed, especially 
when the team you beat to get there has won the 
state championship the two preceeding years. "It 
was more fun this year because it was so much 
more important," says Morton. 

The Bayside leader does not leave the baseball 
xoaching lines with all that much regret. "I know 
football alot bettei* than I do baseball," contends 
the 1967 William and Mary graduate, a school he 
attended on a football grant-in-aid. "By the time a 
boy starts playing baseball in high school all the 



hard coaching has already been done. The fun- 
demantalsare all learned way back in little league. 
All I do is put on the finishing touches," states 
Morton. 

THERE IS ONE aspect of coaching baseball that 
Morton will miss upon entering the realm of high 
school football. "I really believe you have more 
control coaching baseball than you do coaching 
football, "comments the Bayside coach. "You can 
make things happen in baseball. You're either 
going to steal the base or the runner is going to be 
throw out." 

"You can double-guess you're self right there. 
You go out an pull a pitcher because he lod(s tired 
and the next guy you bring in gets racked and you 
have nobody left to bring in," said Morton. "It is 
really scary. You really have to be ready to defend 
yourself for your moves." 

Despite the coachly success on the diamond, 
Morton does not feel the experience will help him on 
the gridiron next fall. "The two sports are separate. 
Baseball is a personal game. You have to prepare 
the players all week for the game. A rah-rah speech 
right before the game won't help. Football is dif- 
ferent. It's phych game. You have to get the players 
up." 

"The (baseball) championship added to the fun of 
coaching, but the real love lies in football." 

The title win did not take any of the lustre off of 
Morton's expectation toward next football season. 
"Being a football coach is something I've always 
wanted to be," states Morton. So come fall Morton 
will be pacing the sidelines in search of a title in 
another sport. 

"Winning in baseball was okay, but it would be 
nothing like winning the football championship," 
comments Morton. Morton will enter next football 
season as the youngest coach in the city chasing 
the title he really wants. 




mif^ 



^»:««««M«!6Wr8*»K^WX•^»S^^ 



BAYSIDE BASEBALL Coach Terry Morton 
intently eyes action on the field, during a 
game against Cox. The Mlirlins clinched at 
least a tie for the district tiUe that afternoon. 
Three days later his players gave Morton a 
district crown in his first year as a head coach 
with a 6-2 win over Kempsville. (Sun photo by 
Neal Sims) 






ft 



2 local bowlers compete 
in Bninswick tournament 



Two Virginia Beach bowlers will be 
knocking down pins May 25 in Bethesda Md., 
seeking a trip to Europe. 

Joseph G. Mason, Sr., 4428 St. Mark Road, 
and Janice D. Echea are the local 
representatives in Brunswick's ninth annual 
"Bowl Your Way to Europe" tournament. Mr. 
Mason and Ms. Echea earned their berths in 
the national tournament by winning a local 
tourney at Brunswick Plaza bowl last month. 
The pair will represent Plaza Bowl in the 
national tourney against 438 bowlers from all 
over the United States and Canada. 



KACH OP THE finalists, representing 220 
Brunswick establishments, will bowl three 
games. The man and woman, scoring the 
most [Mns over his or her average, in a single 



game, will be declared national champions. 
An all-expense paid trip to Europe this 
summer is the first place prize awarded to the 
top man and woman bowlers. Trq)hies and 
cash prizes will be awarded to the runners-up 
in each division. 

Jesse Owens will be the featured speaker at 
the awards banquet May 26 at the Shoreham 
Americana Hotel. Owens, best known for his 
four-gold medal performance at the 1936 
Olympics, serves as one cf the nations finest 
goodwill ambassadors and has devoted much 
of his life to helping underprivileged boys. 

Owens reside in Phoenix and serves as a 
member of the U.S. Olympic Committee, 
consultant to the [n-esident of the American 
Baseball League and has established the 
Jesse Owens Educational Foundation for 
needy youngsters. 



insurance 
agents 

sponsor 

golf 
tourney 



The Virginia Beach Association of Insurance 
Agents will sponsor a golf tournament for junior 
golfers under 18 years of age. The Insurance Youth 
Classic will be played at Red Wing Lake Golf 
Course June 13. 

The local tournament is one of 19 tournaments to 
be staged by local insurance boards affiliated with 
the Virginia Association of Insurance Agents. The 
tournament will be broken down into three 
divisions— 16 and 17 year olds, 14 and 15 year olds— 
and the final bracket of 13 year olds and under. 

The top three finishers in each will be awarded 
trophies and go on to compete in the State finals 
Aug. 5-7. The State finals will be held on the Reston 
Golf Course in Fairfax. 

WINNERS IN THE State finals will be sent to the 
National finals Aug. 16-20 at the Alphine Counb-y 
Club, Cranston R.I. The young golfers at the 
National Tournament will play the last two rounds 
with one of twenty famous PGA touring pros in each 
foursome. 

There will be a cut at the halfway mark of the 72- 
hole national tourney with the low sixty youths 
surviving the cut, prior to joining the pros for the 
final rounds. The pr(» will bie competing for a purse 
in excess of $50,000. 

Local amateur golfers wishing to compete in the 
Insurance Youth Classic may obtain an official 
entry form from any Big "I" Iirfependent Agent in 
the area, or by calling tournament chairman 
Gordon Huey at 428-9161. 



Patriots edge Cavaliers 



Two Beach baseball teams, 

with nothing left to play for but 

pride, closed out their seasons 

May 15. For Princess Anne, 

. their season ended the same 

Cox honors 
athletes at 

bancHiet 

• CoK High School hdd their 
lannual < athletic banquet 
recently and Randy Robinson 
wait home with most of the 
hardware. 

Hk tefented senicM-, who will 
attend, Norf<rik State next year 
■m a football grant-in-aid, was 
mtaeA the outstanding seroor 
on both the football and 
basketball squads. Robinson 
was abo tabbed as the Rhoof s 
besi all-around athtete, winning 
the Walter N. Carroll Award. 

Star track and cross-country 
nauier Brian Rhii^iart was 
singled out for a special award 
BAitert was presented with 
the Bffl Md^arlami Memortel 
award for hte efforts on the 
athletic fieM and in the 
classroom. 

Othn award winners wore 
Jota Zimis^ly (best offemive 
football player and most 
valuable baselMU player), 
lUuwi^ RetMa (bert iklsrive 
foottall player), James 
Gaudreau (most valuable 
wrestler) Brian Rhinehart 
(tnek) aM Steve Bari? 
). 



way it started with a loss to 
Fu-st Cdonial. The Patriots 
defeated the Cavaliers fa- the 
«tond time this season with an 
11-9 extra-innii^ triumph. 

The game closed out the 
Eastern District season for both 
clubs. The win enabled First 
Colonial to edge Princess Anne 
fa- the sbcth place slot in the 
^gue standings with a 4-6 
rword. The Cavaliers, who 
never fully recovered from 
numerous rain-outs at the start 
of the season, finished with a 3-7 
league niark. Cavalier Coach 
Don Van Benschoten suffered 
through his first losing srason 
as a bas^>aU coach. 



PRINCESS ANNE jumped On 
starter DarrdI Don for four 



runs In the bottom of the 
opening inning. The Patriots 
came back to take the lead with 
two runs in the second and Jtv 
five-run burst in the third 
frame. 

Reliever Scott Lowery, who 
came on in relief cf Doss in the 
first inning, could not hold the 7- 
4 lead as the CavaUers knotted 
the scM-e with a last ditch two- 
run raUy in the bottmn of the 
sevenUi. 

Two innings later, First 
Colonial put the issue away with 
a four-run rally in the t(^ of the 
ninth inning. 

The Cavaliers tried the 
coneback route one more time, 
but their two-run rally fell 
short. Lowery pidced up his 
second win against five losses 
despite being touched for five 
nuw in he relief stinL 




BOZO'^'^GI 

TOP 




2:30 PM WEEKDAYS 



Out of sight, out of mind they say. 
And it's certainly true with your 
telephone book. ""- — ' 

So, take it out of the bottom drawer 
or the back closet or wherever you've been 
keeping your phone book. 



And keep it near your phone 
where it's fast and easy to use. 

We figure if you keep the book by the 
phone, you'll know where you can get your 
hands'on it. 

It's an idea worth keeping in mind. 



Keep tilie bookby the phone. 
©C&Plelephone 






mmm 



■« 



mmmmmmmm^^ 



mm^mmmmmm 



Ptm A^^TTm Sun-Wtdmsday, Miy 22, 1974 




KEMPSVILLE'S NUMBER one player Roger 
Savage tees off at the recent city golf tourney. 
As he has all season, Savage was a key 



performer for the Chiefs at the l^te Golf 
Tournament in Charlotesville. (Sun photo by 
Rod Mann) 



Chiefs fade in stretch 



The state golf title will not be returning to 
Virginia Beach this year. Kempsville, trailing by 
five strokes at the half way mark, faded on the 
second day of the tourney, finishing second 25 
strokes off the pace of winning Martinsville on 
Tuesday in Charlottesville. 

Kempsvill^'s team score of 637 was keyed by 
Roger Savage who fired a 74-79-153 to tie for fifth 

Locals search for ^ 
wins at state meet 



Beach harriers will be 
seeking to rebound from a 
dismal Eastern Regional 
showing at the State Meet in 
Charlottesville this weekend. 

Beach harriers, strong 
performers in their own 
backyard this outdoor season, 
ran into a familiar {x-oblem at 
the Regionals, Saturday. Beach 
harriers were blasted by the 
swift and deep Pennlnsula track 
teams. Ferguson High School 
was the main tormentor rolling 
to art impressive first place 

score of 74. 

» 

Bayside was the highest 
Beach finisher. The Marlins, 
second place finishers in the 
Eastern District Meet two 
weeks ago, could do no better 
than fourth place in the regional 



well behind Ferguson's meet 
winning pace with a team score 
of 44. 

Roscoe Coles set three 
Bayside school records in the 
regional trials with a 9.8 100, a 
21.3 220 and a 48.7 440. The swift 
senior could not keep up the 
pace in the finals, however, 
failing to take a first in anv oT 
the sprints. Coles had swept the 
three races in both the city and 
district meets. 

Beach harriers failed to 
deliver a single title at the 
regional. They will be hoping to 
remedy that oversight at the 
coming state meet. Any Beach 
harrier, whomet state standards 
at the district meet or placed in 
the regional is eligible for the 
state meet. 



place in the individual scoring. Tom CuUen (155), 
Jim Ballew ( 162) and Kory DeMun ( 167) rounded 
out the Chief effort. Princess Anne's Richard 
Tucker (166) and Bayside's Don Newhart were the 
other city golfers competing in the two-day tourney. 

Defending state medalist Richard Tucker of 
Princess Anne saw his dream of two consecutive 
state titles slip away on the first round of the 
tourney. The junior balloned to an 86 over the first 
18 holes to put him 13 strokes behind halfway leader 
Timmy Baker of Hampton and out of contention. 

KEMPSVILLE'S ROGER Savage stayed in the 
running for individual honors with a fine first 
round. The musclar junior toured the Keswick 
Country Club course in two-over par 74 for the first 
18 holes. Savage was only one stroke off the pace set 
by Baker. 

Led by Savage's fine play the Chiefs were in a 
challenging position at the halfway mark for the 
team championship. Kempsville posted a team 
score of 314 good for second place at the halfway 
point. 

Martinsville High School held a five stroke lead 
going into the final round with a team total of 309. 
Billy Sibbick and Eric Smith keyed Martinsville's 
surge to the top after 18 holes of play. Sibbick 
matched Savage's round with a 74 performance of 
his own. Teammate Sjnith was one str<*e back with 
a 75 for the first 18 holes. 

Kempsville was trying to gain their second state 
championship in four years. The Chiefs took the title 
in 1970. Two-time defending state champion 
Princess Anne did not qualify for the state tourney. 



BOAT 

OWNER 

READ 

THIS! 




Pair named All-Americas 



The Princess Anne basketball 
team did not make it past the 
first round of The Eastern 
District basketball tournament, 
but two of Coach Leo Anthony's 
players stood out in comparison 
to players from around the 
nation, according to Coach and 
Athlete magazine. Tom Callen 
and John Paden have been 
selected to the magazine's All- 
America honor roll. 



WE HAVE A NEW POLICY DE- 
a(»(ED FOR THE OWNERS 
OF OUTBOAROS, INBOARDS, 
SA1LW>ATS AND INBOARD/ 
OUTBOARDS, 25 FEET OR 
UNDER.COVERAGEINCLUDES1 

YOUR BOAT, MOTOR, EQUIP- 
MENT A TRAILER 

YOUR UABIUTY TO OIHERS 
ARISING FROM THE USE OF 
BOAT. t- 

MEDICAL PAYMENTS 

12 M(»4THS OPERATION 

UNRESTRICTED TERRITORIAL 
UMITS. 

PREMIUMS INCLUDE COVER- 
ACS FOR PHYSICAL feAM- 
AGE $100,000. WATERCRAFT 
UABILITY AND $1,000 MEDI- 
CAL PAYMENTS. 



CHECK 
WITH US 
FOR COST 

COMPARISON 




Their selection makes the 
Cavalier due eligible for 
selection to the magazine's Top 
100, Super 10 and Cum Laude 
teams. Those AU-Amerfea 
squads will be announced in the 
May-June edition of Coach and 
Athlete. 

Paden and Callen were 
iniportant cogs in the Princess 
Anne attack this seasoa Guard 
Callen was the quartertack of 
the Cavalier offense and a stout 
defender in Princess Anne's 
lea^e-leading defense. Callen 
controlled the ball the majority 
of the time in the Cavalier's 
patient offense. 

PADKN. A high-scoring 
forward, was one of the 
deadliest outside shooters in the 
Beach this past season. The 6'4" 
Paden averaged nearly 18 
points a game to finish well up 
in the city scoring race. Paden's 
deadly outside shooting opened 
up the inside for teammate 
George Purdin. 

C^Uen and Paden were both 
members of the 1974 Sun All- 
City basketball teaufcThey join 
the Bayside duo oyiJlton Gross 
and Jim Goff igan on the Coach 



and Athlete All-America honor 
roU. 




Junior tennis tourneY 
set for this weeicend 



Some of the best young tennis player's in the city 
will be on display at the Virginia Beach Junior 
Tennis Tournament at the Princess Anne tennis 
courts. 

There will be four divisions of competition — 18 
and under, 16 and under, l4 and under and 12 and 
under. Boys and girls divisions will be separate. 

B(^s in the 16 and 18 year old brackets must 
register by 5:30 p.m. Friday. The first round in 



those divisiods will be played that night. 

The other brackets will begin play at 9:00 a.m. 
on Saturday. Entrants must register by 8:45 a.m. 
Saturday. 

Matches will be forfeited by any player ^0 
exceeds the 30-minute waiting period past the 
posted Ume of play. The lune-point tie-breaker will 
be used when a set is tied at M. 




MARY COUGHLIN (left) and Leigh Nagle 
compete in the city-wide tennis extramural 
tournament Saturday at Princess Anne. 
Neither girl came home with top honors in the 



tourney but both could be key performers 
when Beach schools institute girls tennis on an 
interscholastic basis next season. (Sun photos 
by Rod Mann) 



Girls compete In tennis tourney 



The girls, who have been sitting on the sidelines, 
watching the boys play finally got onto the court. 
The public schools city-wide tennis extramural 
tennis tournament was held Saturday at Princess 
Anne in conjunction with a week long program 
involving the schools physical education classes. 

The girls tournament drew representatives from 
all the city's junior and senior high schools. 
Individual school representatives were determined 
through elimination tournaments held at the 
respective schools earlier in the week. 

IN TIIK HKQl'IRKD singles competition, Laura 
Creasy of Bayside Junior High School was the 
winner in competition between eighth, ninth and 
tenth grade girls. In required doubles, the First 
Colonial duo of Pat Edwards and Vicki Phelps 
teamed up to take top honors. 

Kempsville High School's Cindy Craft was the 
elective singles winner in competition l)etween 
juniors and seniors. The Princess Anne High School 
team of Vicki Arnett and Kathy Kennedy took top 
honors in elective doubles. 

The city-wide extramural tennis tournament 
offers the only inter-school tennis competition for 



girls in Virginia Beach. That will change next year 
when the city institutes a competitive girls tennis 
program in the secondary schools. 

Summerell leaves 
ECU baseball team 



Carl Summerell, shortstop on 
the East Carolina University 
baseball team, will not be with 
his team at the NCAA District 
III playoffs. The Kellam high 
school graduate has decided to 
skip the baseball tournament 
due t6 football commitments. 

Summerell was tabbed by the 
New York Giants as a 
quarterback prospect in last 
year's NFL draft He must 
report June 8 to Lut^ock Tex. 
fm- the Coaches All-America 
football game. Summerell must 
also spend a weekend in New 
York at the Giants quarterback 



school. 

Summo-ell was honored at 
the Virginia Beach Sports 
Club's annual jamboree as the 
most outstanding college 
football player in the Tidewater 
area. Under Summerell's 
guidance, the Pirates won two 
consecutive Southern 
Conference crowns with back to 
back 9-1 seasons. 

At the time of his departure 
{rem the East Carolina 
oaseball squad Summerell was 
leading the club in hitting with a 
.326 batting average good for 
fifth in the conference. 



PADEN 



COACIIKS 



The Eastern District Coaches 
have chosen their new officers 
for next year. Cox football 
Coach Al Habit will serve as 
vice-president (rf the association 
and Princes Anne baskett>all 
and golf Coach Leo Anthony will 
renikin in his capacity as 
ti*asurer 



KftW-SSW::::::*:* 



VIRGINIA RECREATION 

OEPT. RECREATION 

ADULT SOFTBALL SCORES 

UNLIMITED, OIV NO. I 
May 8th 



Sports Record 



;*5SW5»:w; 



WSK^«is:«:<«}«*»ft 



Independents 


8vs 


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4 


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11 vs 


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9 


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11 vs 


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11 


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25 vs 


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9 


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6vs 


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3 




City of Virginia Beach 

MEMORIi^ HOLIDAY 
REFUSE COLLECTION SCHEdOlE 



0' I % 



Regular Garbage Collection 

WILL BE MADE 

On Monday, May 27th, 1974 
by the 

City of Virginia Beacti 



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^^HHi^H^pTUMPY LAKE 

a 
iv0ryon0 ffocelvas a Prize ^ 

During our National Golf Day 

Contost May 25-Juno 76 

For a $1.00 contribution, you will receive the 1974 
BOOK OF GOLF & a chance to beat the Pros k re- 
ceive a $1.25 "I Beat the Pro^ Golf BaU. 

See, <mr Golf Pros for a chance to win other Prtzei. 

OCEAN VIEW GOLF COURSE 

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Svs 

7 

36 vs 

3 



27 vs 

6 

• v« 

1 

39 vs 

9 



Team (8) 4vs 
Team (2) 4vs 
Team (4) 4vs 

WOMEN'S 
BEGINNERS 

Team (8! 3vs 
Team (6) 3vs 
Team (4) 2vs 
Team (3) 3vs 



Team (7)3 '. 
Team (6) 2 
Team (1)3 

ADVANCED 



Team (7) 2 
Team (2) j ; 
Team (1)2 i' 
Team (S) 2 



WOMEN'S INTERMEDIATE 



Team(6)3vs 
Team(3)3vs 
Team(5)4vs 



Team(4)2 
Te«m(2)2 
Teamdji 



MEN'S BEGINNERS 



Team (3) 3vs 



Team (2) 2 



MEN'S ADVANCED 

BEGINNERS 



Team (4) Svs 
Team (3) 4vs 
Team (1) Svs 



Team (4) 2 
Team (2)3 
Team (5) 2 



MEN'S INTERMEDIATE 



Team («) Svs 
Team (3) 3w$ 



Team (4) 2 
• earn (J) 1 



^mf^^mmfmmm^ 



■PHUMMMiV^V^F^ 



tti^^:%«jc.»a(.*vf^y-:i, i^^z^z 







The Sun-Wedn«sday, May 22. 1974-PaQi A-9 




AT TOP LEFT, Princess Anne's Sherry Eddins 
tries to clear the bar in the high jump 
competition at the city tracit meet for junior 
and senior high school physical education 
classes Friday night at Kellam. 
In' picture, above, Kempsville junior high 
student strains for extra height In high jump 
competition. Cox's John Pinson (below) 
limbers up before his hurdle heat. 
Bmmulating the words on his shirt, Pinson 
streaked to victory in the heal. At far left, time 
keepers intently eye, 100-yard dash finish at 
Kellam. (Sun photos by Rod Mann) 



Youngsters Just having a day of fun 



\ 



It was different. 

The names of those competing were not the 
familar stars of varsity high school teams. 
Rather it was the unknowns, whose physical 
efforts had been limited to physical education 
classes during the year. You see — last week 
the city held their annual track meets for the 
stud»its, making them the stars of the day. 

Or TTiursday morning, Cox High School 
was invaded by a band of aspiring track stars, 
2,000 strong. The 16th annual City Physical 
Fitness Meet for fourth, fifth, sixth and 
seventh graders was held that day. 

A VIRTUAL SEA of humanity covered the 
Cox football field from one end to the other, 
competing in everything from pull-ups to a 
jump and reach contest. Just the sheer 
number of the competitors was overpowering. 
The participants represented 38 elementary in 
Virginia Beach. Judging was done by 88 
teacher representatives from the various 
schools. 

The performances were not those of highly 
trained athletes rather the first steps of the 
potential stars of tomorrow into the world of 
competitive athletics. 

As in all competitive endeavors, the will to 
win was evident. A smallish fourth grader 



summoning that last ounce of strength to pull 
himself over the bar just one more time. A 
sixth grade girl, on the brink of exhaustitm, 
straining for the last few steps in the 600-yard 
run. A seventh grade boy leaning at the finish 
of the 50-yard dash, hoping to edge a closing 
opponent. The will to win was evident at the 
meet. 

However, the athletes world did not come 
to an end when ten pull-ups was all they could 
manage or they were edged out at the finish of 
the shuttle run. The City Physical Fitness 
Meet was more than that. The joy for the 
participants was in being there and taking 
part. 

"THEY'RE OUT here having fun and that 
is what it is all about," said one meet director. 

On Friday night, it was the eighth, ninth 
and tenth graders hirn at the 11th annual City- 
wide track meet with all the city's junior and 
senior high schools represented. Kellam High 
School was the host for the athletic endeavors 
of some 700 boys and girls. 

The events were more convential than the 
skipping rope of the grade school meet on the 
preceeding day. The participants competed in 
the standard track and field events from the 
shot-put to the mile run. 



But even though the events were a bit more 
convential, the spirit of the meet was closer to 
the calm air of the physical fitness meet then 
the tension-filled atmosphere of the inter- 
scholastic meets. Winning was important, but 
it was not everything. There were no looks of 
anguish when an effort proved short of 
winning caliber. 

FOR THE GIRLS, the meet was probably 
more important than their male counterparts. 
Next year, Beach schools will institute a track 
and field program on the interscholastic level. 
The stars of this year's city meet could very 
well be leading their schools to victory next 
year on the interscholastic front. 

For the boys, it was a chance to step out 
into the limelight. Their times in respective 
races would have been easily echpsed on the 
interscholastic level, but there were no such 
super athletes competii^ at Kellam. A time, 
which surely would have brought a last place 
finish at a scholastic meet, was good enough to 
bring home a ribbon to some smiling athlete. 

The meets proved one thing above all — it 
doesn't take a record-breaking performance 
to have fun — sports stay alive simply because 
of the fun of competing. 




w .«. 












THE WINNERS 



Winners of the Virginia Beach 
Public Schools 16th Annual 
Elementary Citywide Physical 
Fitness Meet held at F.W. Cox 
High School stadium were: 

SO YARD DASH 

4th Grade: 
Tracy Worlds Trantwood 6.4 
(new record) 

Anthony OldsTrantwood 6.6 
(new record) 

5th Grade: 
Oazada Olds Kingston 6.5 (ties 
record) 

Wade Bell Pembroke 6.4 (ties 
record) 

6th Grade: 
Sharon StatonSeatack 6.4 
Kelvin Cooper-Princess Anne 
6.1 (new record) 

7th Grade: 
Judy ^Washington Lynnhaven 
6.1 (ties record) 
James Lawson-Seatack 5.6 
(new record) 

SHUTTLE RUN 

4th Grade: 
^Dawn Watsonthoroughgood 
9.4 
Isaac Smith Luxford 9.2 

Sth Grade: 
Melinda Wiggins Kingston 9.2 
Leofl Wilson-Cooke 9.1 

6th Grade: 
Barbara Crabtree Kemps 
Landing^3 

AzarahflKosley -Newtown Road 
8.9 

7th Grade: 
Mary Jo Hubbard Kempsville 
Meadows 8.7 (ties record) 
Brain Allard Pembroke 8.6 

too YARD RUN-WALK 

4th Grade: 
Donna Whiteman-Cooke 1:52,1 
David Hasktn Maiibu 1:48.3 

Sth Grade: 
Linda Baxter -Newtown Road 
1:48.4 

Kelty Whitetiurst Newtown 
Road 1:40.9 

6th Grade: 
Ronnie Mitchell Kings Grant 
1:44.3 , 
William Jones College Park 

1:36.8 

7th Grade: 
Bridgetfe Comer Kingston 
1:37.1 (new record) 
Robert Stewart Windsor Woods 
',:29,6 

STANDING LONG JUMP 

4th Grade: 
Tammy Gatlln. Newtown Road 

Timothy Hughes Kingston 
6'i**" 

Sth Grade: 
Sclwida Forney Aragona 7'1" 
Marvin Let Thorottfhgood 



6'llVj" 

6th Grade: 
Vita Sills-Trantwood 7'8" 
Tim Honeycutt-J.B. Dey 7'9" 

7th Grade: 
Marie Smith b.f. Williams 
7'10%" 

Johnnie Mitchell Kings Grant 
8'SV2" 

JUMPt REACH 

4th Grade: 
Amy Summers-Pembroke 18- 
?U" 

Leonard Gofflgan-Hermitage 
22-%" (new record) 

5th Grade: 
Lynn Pratts Thoroughgood 
20'%" 

Lawrence Ervin Windsor Oaks 
19" 

6th Grade: 
Terry Joshua Princess Anne 
22%" 
Scott Mansfield Pembroke 22" 

7th Grade: 
Renee Holloman B.F. Williams 
25'/," 
Gary Tyson"-Wermitage 26'/3" 

ROPE SKIP 

4th Grade: 
R ita Weimorts - K ingston 196 
Jimmy Harper Maiibu 202 

Sth Grade: 
Lori Schaarschmidt Windsor 
Wo^ds 192 

David McWhorf^n • 
Kingston 216 

6th Grade: 
Melanie Tinkler Kemps 

Landing 224 

Brian Belcher College Park 218 

7th Grade: 
Susan Jaeger 

Thoroughgood 228 

Joe King B.F.Williams 230 

(new record) 



PULLUPS 

Am Grade: ^ 

Craig Schneider Kempsville 
Meadows 23 

Sth Grade: 
Brian Mordecai Linkhorn 

Park 25 

6th Grade: 
Donald Nanney Newtown 
Road 20 

7th Grade; 
Ron Brooks Kemps Landing 33 

4»h Grade Champion: 
Kingston 23V4 Points 

Sth Grade Champion; 
Kingston 2S'? Points 

6tls Grade Champion: 
Kemps Landing 22 Points 

?»i Grade Champion: 
B.F.Williams 26'» Points 

City Wide Champion: 
Kingston .- 7l>'iPoinH 



EXTRAMURAL TRACK 
WINNERS 



STH GRADE GIRLS 



High Jump — Bath Lake — Bay. 

Jr., 4'7"-»- 
Low Hurdles — Bernadette 

Mosley — Kemp. Jr., 8.5 

sec.4- 
50 yard — Jackie McGue — 

Plaia Jr„ 6.4 $ec,+ 
440 yard — Laurie Eure — P, 

Anne, 1:10.6 sec.-l- 
220 yard — Diana Lamb — 

Kellam, 28.9 sec.-f 
100 yard — Verna Dickens — 

Cox, 12.5 sec.-i- 
Long Jump — Jackie McGue — 

Plaza Jr., 16'2'V 
Relay — ' Kelly McCabe, 

Lave/Ida Sander lin, 

Bernadette Mosley, Teresa 

Smith — Kemp. Jr., 55.1 

sec.-f 



Bay. Jr. 



16V2 



10TH GRADE OIRLS 



High Jump — Dianne Lovitt — 

Kemp Sr., 4'4" 
Low Hurdles — Fonda Lawson 

— F. Colonial, 8.3 sec.-l- 

50 yard — Fonda Lawson — F. 

Colonial, 6.4 sec.-l- 
440 yard — Sue Dyer — F. 

Colonial, 1:08,9 sec.+ 
220 yard — Deslree Steverson — 

F. Colonial, 27.5 sec.-l- 
100 yard — Deslree Steverson — 

F. Colonial, 12.5 s#c. 
Long Jump — Phyllis Geofrey 

— Kellam, 15'6" 

Relay — Fonda Lawson, Cathy 
Rudell, Sue Dyer, Desiree 
Steverson — F. Colonial, 55.1 
sec.-f 



Shot — Dennis Hoggard — - 

Kellam, 447" 
Low Hurdles — Ronald 

Foreman— Kellam, 15.5 sec. 
100 yard — Herman Riddick — 

Kellam, 11.4 sec. 
100 yard -^ Mike Lamb ~ Plaza 

Jr., 11.4 sec. 
Mile — John Martin — P. Anne, 

5:17,2 sec. 
440 yard — James Davis ^ 

Kemp. Jr., 56.9 sec, 
880 yard — Bobby Pinson — 

Cox, 2:14.8 sec. 
220 yard — Mike Lamb — Plaza ' 

Jr., 25.1 sec. 
High Jump — John White ~ F 

Colonial, 5'7" 
Relay — Robert McPherson, 

Herman Riddick, Keith 

Baker, Ronald Foreman — 

Kellam, 1:42.8 sec. 



TEAM: 



TE<^: 



Kellam 

Princess Anne 
Cox 



22 
20 
18 



TEAM: 



Kempsville Jr. 
Bayslde Jr. 
Plaza Jr. 



20 
16 
14 



First Colonial 
Kemps. Sr. 
Cox 



30 

23 

9 



♦TH GRADE GIRLS 



High Jump — Undea Herbert — 

Bay. Sr., 4'8" 
Low Hurdles — Marilee Russell 

— Bay. Jr., 8.4 sec.-l- 

Low Hurdles Terry Taylor — 

Kemp. Jr., 8.4 sec.-f 
50 yard — Sharon Donan — Cox, 

6.5 sec.-f 
440 yard — Linda Perkins — 

Kemp Jr , 1 04 5 sec + 
220 yard — Lu Juam 

Washington — Bay. Sr,, 28.3 

sec.-f 
220 yard — Dorie Hume — Cox, 

28.3 sec + 
100 yard - Luann Jordan — 

Bay. Sr., 12.2 sec 
Long Jump — Peggy Schaefer 

- Bay Jr , 16'5'j" 

Relay — Peggy Schaefer, Cathy 
Evans, Gwen Jones, Laura 
Creasy — Bay. Jr., 54.8 sec. 



(TH GRADE BOYS 

Long Jump - _^ 

Batfington — Bay. Jr., 

18'8'j" 
Low Hurdles — Paul Townsend 

— Bay. Jr., 16 3 sec 
100 yard — Mike Felton — Va. 

Beach, 11.3 sec 
440 yard — John Swingle — Cox, 

58.2 sec 
880 yard — Ronnie Sawyer — 

Kellam, 2:20.2 sec. 
220 yard - Bobby Cochran - 

Kellam, 25.1 sec. 
High Jump — Tony Foreman — 

Bay. Jr., 5'4" 
Relay — Mike Conway, Tonr- 

Foreman, Paul Townsend, 

James Barrington — Bay 

Jr., 1:46 1 sec 



lOTH GRADE BOYS 



,.faAH 



TEAM: 



Long Jump - Marvin McCoy' 

Kemp, Sr., 18'ir' 
Shot — Ronald Jackson 

Kellam, 43'8" 
Low Hurdles— Dave McMahon 

— F. Colonial, 15.3 sec. 
100 yard — Vince Marshall ■ 

Kellam, 10,9 sec, 
100 yard - Willie Palmer 

Bay, Sr,, 10,9 sec. 
Mile — David Moore — Cox, 

514 1 sec 
440 yard -- Thaddus Smith 

Kellam, 55 6 sec. 
880 yard John Murphy — Cox, 

- "2rT3 9 sec 

220 yard — Steve Zimmerly 

Cox, 23 8 sec.+ 
High Jump - Brian Macon 

Kellam, 5'ir'f 
Relay - Vince Marshall, 

Martin Merrill, Alvan 

Holley, Earl Glover 

Kemp. Sr , t 39 2 sec. 



Bayside Jr. 

Kellam 

va. Beach Jr. 



26' J 

22' 2 
IS 



TEAM: 



TEAM: 



Cox 
Bay Sr. 



18' 
II 



rrH GRADE BOYS 



Long Jump — Jimmy DiNardO 
- P. Anne, 18' 10" 



Kellam 
Kemp Sr 
Cox 

4 T ies or ••»» flew record 



27' J , 
22' J • 
20 ' 



^pim 



nf" 



z' 



A-lO-The Sun-Wednesday, May 22, 1974 



V. 






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The proof is in the eating 



NOBODY EVER SAID that picking 
strawberries te easy wwii, as these pickers 
will tell yoH at strawberry fields off Londmi 
Bridge Road near NAS Oceana. But the 



Neptune 
Festival 



Bobby Riggs 
on his court 



That most famous male .chauvinist of them all, 
tennis hustler Bobby Riggs, will play a series of 
exhibition matches during the fall Neptune 
Festival. 

His appearance was announced last week at a tea 
sponsored by the Council of Garden Clubs of 
Virginia Beach and the Chamber of Commerce 
Neptune Festival committee. 

Mr. Riggs will "play" tennis at 4 p.m. Sept. 28 
against 12 female tennis players, all on the court at 
the same time. In other games, he will face his 
opponent while restraining a German shei^erd on a 
leash, match his opponent while sitting down and 
while wearing scuba gear and swim fins. 

He is a former U.S. single and doubles champion. 
He was defeated last year by women's champion 
Kllie Jean King is a widely-publicized match at the 
Houston Astrodome. * 

TIIK VIRGINIA BFACH Tennis Patrons and the 
Tidewater Tennis Center arranged for Mr. Riggs' 
appearance at the festival. 

The Neptune Festival, which will be Sept. 27 - Oct. 
(>, also has other special events scheduled, an- 
nainced at last week's tea for King Neptune's court 
candidates. 

Mike Suyderhaud, world champion water skiier, 
will perform during a two-day skiing tournament 
Sept. 27 and 28 on the large recreation lake at Mt. 
Trashmore. The skiing competition is sponsored by 
the Virginia Beach Water Ski Club. 

That star of many a finger-lickin' good chicken 
commercial. Col. Harlan Sanders, will ride in the 
(Jrand Coronation Day Parade Oct. 5. 

The appearance of the United States Naval 

Academy Band will be a highlight of the Com- 
munity Torchlight Parade on Sept. 27. opening night 
of the festival. 

7 girls serve 
on anotlier 

Seven Virginia Beach high school students have 
been selected to serve as the official court for King 
Neptune I in the Virginia Beach Neptune Festival 
Sept. 27 - Oct. 6. 

The official court will be made up of one student 
from each public high school and one from a private 

school. The finalists are: 

Lynn Anne Ashbacher, 16, Bay side High School; 
Elizabeth Giwdrich. 16. Kempsville High School; 
Kathleen Anne kokes, 17, Cox High School; Naricy 
Ann McTague, 16. First Colonial High School; 
Sharon Elaine Norrell, 17. Princess Anne High 
.School; .JacqtKline Uelores Robertson, 17, Kellam 
High School, and Karie Lyrtn Roas. 17, Tidwater 
Christian School. 

The seven members of the court were selej;jed 
from 20 semi-finaliflis last week at a tea spoofed 
by the Council of Garden Clubs of Virginia^^ch. 

Each of the court members will receive $100, a 
wardrobe for the festival and a charm course. 

.Judges who selected the court are State Sen. A. 
.Josei* Canada. Judge Frederic Aucamp, public 
relations executive Lynn Fischer and modeling 
school owner Vicky Randall. 




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reward conies when you pop one of those ripe 
and juicy self -picked berries into your mouth. 
(Sun photo by Rod Mann) 



*oves 



City 

zoning changes 



The Virginia Beach City 
Council Monday approved 10 
zoning changes in the 
Kempsville Borough that will 
allow for office construction. 

Six petitions for zoning 
changes filed by different 
persons changed about 2>/^ 
acres of the Holland Terrace- 
Larkspur areas from R-5 
Residential District to 0-1 Office 
district. 

Petitioneers included: Fred 
D. and Hattie G. Holloway, 
Robert and Mary Reid (two 
zoning applications), Cornell 
and Casandra Freeman, Robert 
and Mildred 0. Perry and 
Clarence L. and Elaine B. 
Walker. 

Councilmen John Baum, 
Robert Cromwell, Reid Ervin, 
George Ferrell, Dr. Clarence 
Holland, Murry Malbon, J. 
Curtis Payne, Charles Gardner, 
Floyd Waterfield and Garland 
Isdell voted f(f tfee .*PW!g 
changes. Councilman Robert 
Callis was absent- from the 
meeting. 

TIIK COUNCIL als»Appr«v«d^ 
zoning changes in the College 
Park-Level Green areas to 
allow construction jtf an office 
park and shopping center off of 
Indian River Road and the 
Centerville Turnpike. Metro 



Center Associates was granted 
zoning changes from B-2 
Community Business District 
and H-1 Hotel District to 0-1 
Office District on about 14 acres 
(rf land. The Mefro Center 
Associates application to 
change 36 acres of I-l light 
industrial to B-2 Community 
Business District to build a 
shopping center also received 
approval. 

Councilmen Baum, 
Cromwell, Ervin, Ferrell, 
Holland, Malbon, Payne, 
Gardern, Waterfield and Isdell 
voted in favor of the changes. 
Councilman Callis was absent. 

The Council voted to. defer 
the application (rf A. Gordon 
Stephenson and Elizabeth Sills 
for a zoning change from R-6 
Residential District to A-4 
Apartment District on property 
on the West Side of Pacific 
Avenue in the Princess Anne 
Country Club area. 



(lAINSINTKRNSHIP 

■Paul R. Gilding of Virginia 4 
Beach is one of five Virginians 
selected to participate in the 
1974-75 Virginia Commonwealth 
Interns "Program. He is a 
graduate student at the College 
of William and Mary. 



Hospital 



(Continued from page A-1) 

held responsible, in some cases 
the court has said that they, as 
hospital employes, also are 
immune from suit." 

Sen. Canada cites a case 
< though it was not in Virginia 
Beach) where a man tried to 
sue a ' hospital for negligence 
which left his wife a 
paraphegic. "He has carried on 
a one-man crusade to get this 
law chan^, and there are 
thousands of similar cases," 
Sen Canada says, 

He adds that the hospitals 
claim to be charitable, but they 
charge for all medical services. 

"CIIAHITABLK IMMUNITY 

started back with the kings," 
Sen. Canada says. "The king 
could do no wrong, and so he 
was immune from suit. Then it 
was carried over to the 
government and then you 
couldn't sue the hospitals." 

Mr. Willis says, "A position 
taken by the non-profit hospitals 
in the stale over a period of 
years was that we cmtinued to 
(teserve charitable immunity 
because our hospitals have had 
to write off millions of dollars 
each year for welfare patients 
for whom the state, cities and 
counties would not pay, either 
at all or in full." 

Heestimates that the General 



Gilreath 



Hospital of Virginia Beach 
wrote off $50,000 in bills for 
welfare patients and some 
$200,000 in unpaid medical 
expenses for Medicaid patients 
last year. 

- "IN KVKRY STATK in the 
union where charitable 
immunity has been lost, only 
the trial lawyers have really 
benefited." Mr. Willis says. "In 
every case, insurance 
premiums, costs of defense of 
nuisance suits and time away 
from work, all have led to great 
increases in ( hospital operation) 
costs. A study commission of 
the House of Delegates found 
that the hiaximum increase in 
costs of hospitals, based on 
oilier slates, would only -be 50 
cents per patient day. In this 
hospital alone, that amcHjnts to 
approximately $36,000 a year." 

If study prdfetetions are 
correct, patients will pay 50 
cents more for each day they 
must spend in the Beach 
hospital. Room costs alone in 
the hospital are $47 for a semi- 
private room. $57 for a private 
room and $64 for the ne«^ 
p-ivale rooms on the recently 
opened fourlh floor. As^*™ 
private hospital, the General 
Hospital of Virginia Beach 
receives revenues for health 
care only from patient fees. 



(Continued from page A-1) 
"irrrelible imjwlse." 

nil. K Al.Pli H. Wadeson Jr., 
who treated Mr. Gilbreath 
(kiring most of the 17 months he 
attended (be Washinglwi. D.C. 
Psychiatric Institute, labeled 
Mr. Gilbreath as a "latent 
schtzophrerae" with leanings 
towards fantasy. Dr. Wadeson 
also said he felt that tl» 
cwifessiorK were made in a 
"psychrttic episode" during 
which Mr. Gilreath was 
menially unresponsible. Mr. 
Gilreath was released in 
September 1973 as an out 
patient attending group therapy 
.sessions tv,\(x weekly 

Under cross-cxamiriation, I)r 
Wadeson said he was unable to 
nffer any real evidence that Mr. 
GilrMlh was. in fact, in a 
psycho! ic episode frmn the time 
nf the girl's ilisnppca ranee until 



the lime of his dictating a 
written corrfession to Ihe poli<s. 
Dr. James D. Hague, director 
(rf the Atlantic Mental Hygiene 
Center in Virginia Beach, who 
examined Mr. Gilreath 
Thursday, supported defense 
contentions that Mr. Gilreath 
gave the confession "to get the 
questionir^ over with." Dr. 
Hague -«lse- -S8«^ - fhaf- 
ctrnduded Mr. Gilreath had an 
uncontrollable impulse to "grab 
and fondle" ynung girls. 

The statement given police by 
Mr Gilreath said that he fwced 
the girl into the woods only lo 
embrace her. bul that he 
became frightened erf being 
f(xind on the school grounds 
which woukJ he a violati«i of his 
p-ohation 

The trial was moved from 
Pairfax County to Virginia 
Beach due lo extensive p-e- trial 
publicity 

V 



Jiti 



I 



i 



HffcStylcs 



BFiioeg 



Music 



Bands march in festival 



Some 3,280 persons will march on the Beach a^ a 
pari of the 1974 Virginia Beach Music Festival June 

n-m. 

students in 19 high school bands from nine states 
will particifMte in this year's music festival. The 
Princess Ann High Schod Marching Cavaliers will 
host the event, ami the Fort Hunt High School Band 
from Alexandria, winner of the 4973 marching 
festival competition, will be the honor band. 

(Virginia Beach high school bands are not 
allowed to participate in the competition.) 

A Grand Festival Parade on Atlantic avenue will 
open the music fete at 7:30 p.m. June 17. Morning 
concerts and sightreading competition at the Civic 
Center June 18 and 19 will be open to the public free 



of charge. Marching exhibitions and competitions 
will be at the Cox High l^hool stadium at 8 pjn. 
June 20. Awards and trqrfiies will be presented 
after ttie marching competition, and the winner of 
the 1974 contest automatically becomes the honor 
band for next year's festival. 

JUDGEIS FOR THIS year's competition are Al G. 
Wright, W. J. Julian, Roy V. Wood and WiUiam F. 
Swor. Awards also will be presented for b^t drum 
major and majorette, bttt in show and oth^ band 
competition categories. 

Charles H. Forbes is chairman of the 1974 festival 
which has been sponsored by the Virginia Beach 
Chamber of Commerce for 13 years. 



Pageant talent sought 



Girls ages 6-10 who dream of winning a beauty 
pageant may compete in the "1974 Little Miss 
Virginia Beach Pageant" sponsored by the city 
Parks and Recreation Department. 

Pageant prellmirmries, including a three-minute 
talent presentation, {4iysical fitness and evening 
gown competitions, will be at 7:30 p.m. July 10 at 
Plaza Junior High School. "Fifteen girls will be 
selected to appear in the main pageant Aug. 2 at 
Plaza Junior High. WCMS radio announcer Joe 
Hoppel will emcee the pageant. 

"Little Miss Virginia Beach" will retM-esent the 
city at various events sponsored by the Parks and 
Recreation Department during the year. Pageant 



prizes will be donated by area merchants. 

All applications must be mailed to the Parks 
Department, postmarked no later than June 28. 
Entry forms are available at the children's 
department of The Cowardly Lion, Dolly and 
Bobby's, Evelyne's Children Shop, Miller and 
Rhoads, The Nanny Shop, Rices J*4achmans and 
Sears Roebuck Pembtcke Btore. Applications also 
will be available at the Academy of the Virginia 
Beach Ballet, Artistic Dance Academy, Bobbi and 
Helen School of Dance, Shirley Darden, Brown 
Baton and Dance School, Caprio Dance Studio, 
Janice Ferguson School o{ Dance, Fields Dance 
Studio, Rita Holland Dancing School and the Dance 
Guild of Virginia. 



Trial drama on stage 



A live monkey and a large human cast 
combine fw the drama "Inherit the Wind" 
(^)aung Friday at the Virginia Beach Little 
."nieatre, 24th Street and Barberton Drive. 

Hie play, written by Jerome Lawrence and 
Robert E. Lee, is a cbramatic reenactment of 
the 1925 courtroom clash between Clarence 
Darrow and William Jennings Bryan over 
different theories of the evolution of man. 
Althou^ based on that famous Scopes 
monkey trial, the names of events and 
characters have been changed in the stage 
version. 

Tlie Beach production features Robert 
Furniss, who is a lawyer by professiai, as the 
prosecuting attorney Matthew Harrison 
Brady. Two local tdevision personalities, Mac 
McManus (as Henry Drummond) and Marcia 
Bartusiak (as Rachel Brown), will fill other 
lead roles. 

FRED JENKS III will be the science 
teacher, Bertram Gates, who is on trial for 
teaching the theories of Darwin. Fran 
Peterson is cast as the cynical reporter E. K. 
Hornbeck. The Rev. Jeremiah Brown, who is 
intent upon the punishment of the "inHdel" 
teacher whom his own daughter Ipves, will be 
portrayed by Bob Burchette. 

Hie play is under the direction of Pat 
Bernick, speech and drama teacher at 
Kempsville High School. Tony Smith is the 
assistant director. 

The show will be on stage Fridays and 
Saturdays through June 8. Curtain time is 8:30 
p.m. Tickets are $3 for adults and $1.50 for 
students and the military. Reservaticms may 
be made by calling the theatre at 428-9523. 




THE REV. JEREMIAH BROWN (played by 
Robert Burchette) explains what the gospel 
says about the evolution of man to Matthew 
Harrison Brady (played by Robert Furniss) in 
the Virginia Beach Little Theatre production 
of 'inherit the Wind." 



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Marching to leadership 



Marching barefoot may not be the 
accepted way to drill in Kempsville High 
School's Naval Junior Reserve Officer 
Training Corps (NJROTC), but Susan 
Carrigan finds it the most comfortable 
mode of marching. ^ 

Ms. Cftrrigan, a 16-y«|r-old junior, is 
one of 18 females in the 70 member 
NJROTC. On the day Sun phot(^rapher 
Rod Mann visited the school, Ms. 
C!arrigan and her fellow cadets were 
learning the Cossack Manual of Arms, 
explained the school's Naval science 
instructor, Cmdr. Ray Lackore. 

The students in the NJROTC cadets 
also are eligible for scholarships at 
military academies. 

TIIK 70 MEMBERS of the Kempsville 



High corps participate in a three-year 
program, with each year of training 
giving them one credit toward 
graduation. Students have two hours of 
military drill and three hours of 
classroom instruction per week. 

The Kempsville High School NJROTC 
program started two years ago, when 
the 1972-73 school year opened. Women 
have always been members of the corps. 

The first year, five women par- 
ticipated. This year there are 18, and by 
next year, Cmdr. Lacliore hopes to see 30 
to 35 women in a corps numbering over 
100 members. 

If as many women participate in the 
corps next year as he hopes, Cmdr. 
Lackore has plans to start an all-female 
precision driU team. 



^*=* 



^un photos 



by Rod lyianii 





z> 



Thatjimk willlm famous same day 






I keep reading about notable pe<^le who have 
donated their papers, tapes and memorabilia to 
universities and lilx^ri^ for the study and 
en%htenment (tf future gawrations. So I'm savii^ 
my p^>«^. 

Nobody has asked me for them yet, but if 
iMNsewiv^ h»ep defecting to the state l^islature, 
law schools and jockey traini^ classes, my stuff 
may beemne rare. I mean, houttwives may at last 
enjoy the prestige (tf a minority ^oup. We'll be 
'in." 

CtuMren in sixth ^acte classes (d 19M mi^t be 
instructed to do res^o'ch m mv& and mothere who 
rtayed tone. "Thwe were a few such womoi in 
1974," their t«K:ha' will say, "N(^, tapes and 
n^morabilia of oik are cm diqilay across Umn at 
the liteary. Better hurry if you want to get a look at 
it. RgoK to I^ris in three days where it will do two 
wedB at the SorbmuK." 

mE mUNDER OF tiny f^ will f Anr m the 
chihkm tiary cro^-town, poicUs in tend, to take 
note m tte hottest etayMy since tt» H^apag 




Crane flew over city hall. So I'm being vei^ careftil 
what I save. 

I want those poor U^ who are ^rowii^ shwter 
from too many TV dinnen, totiee ttiii^ which will 
g^ them tUi^ii^ Aiwh^ the menMraUUa will be 
a homenuKle cvMm 

"Look!," the 1^ wUl say, "A cookie without a 
trade name eirtwaed nn it. Il's m odd thi^ too. 
Abitoct, rathn- a Salvwi«- IteU ttepe." 

fhaf« wiU be a birttMbiy party u^tta^m. 



"Hey," they will chorus, "Kids in those days got 
parties on Saturday instead ^ coqjerative 
vacuuming. Far out!" 

THERE WILL BE that lovingly Mother's Day 
card saying what a swell p«-son I am in 27 
misspelled words. The snapshot of our cat, Sam, 
jiBt after she had kittenf, in ccmcert for the whole 
neigHKirbood, in tlw linen closet. A tand-aid with 
lip prints on it to slww a U^ is as important as 
immedicate temporary aid. A bo<* for reading 
almxi with my bo<4cmarfc in it. 

And when those 1997 kith go home timt night, who 
knows what will c«ne o( their exp<%ure to the 
papers and memorabilia of a housewife, circa 1974? 

"Gee, mom." that boy who was so im|M^Ksed 
with the Iwmemacte (^dcie might say, "How come 
^Hi (k)n't stop slttii^ arowd the Houw of 
Rep-esentativa all day and sit arouixi ours in- 
^ad? We could get a cat and read out loiMl. I could 
0ve you back the k^ to the trmt (kxM- I w^r 
vouid my iwck mi you could answer my knock." 

My simple pap«^ ra^t open a few (tocMV at ttet. 



T^ 



inside 
Lif€Styl€S 

Brides B-2 

Food B-2 

Sun Dial B-2 

IMi^n B-3 



-J 



!■ 



PuflB B-2-The Sun-Wednesday, May 22, 1974 



FOOD 




dishes offer veisatmty 



IjeIs consider the egg. 

What other food — in such a 
small, tidy package — otters 
cpiite so much versatility. 

It's th^e in the morning on 
the breakfast table in many 
disguises: poached, scram- 
bled, in omelet form, shirred 
or baked or fried. 

Or it's on the lunch table in 
s^dwiches, salads, gekitin 
mdds or simply as a garnish. 

The egg also presents itself 
in many forms at the dinner 
taWe. It's in your favcrite 
souffle, Eggs Florentine, in a 
quiche or in Eggs Fu Yung. 

In desserts it reappears in 
countless forms from cus- 
tards to angel food cake. 

While we're not pushing 
egp 24 hmirs a day, especial- 
ly in light of the cholesterol is- 
sQe, eggs can be depended 
i^n to perform admirably in 
a meatless dish or two. 

Today's recipe collection 

-^-i— (Advertisement) •>i^— 

FOOD 

FOR 

THOUGHT 

By PAUL ROMAN 

A few drops of lemon juice 
in the cooking water helps 
keep Cauliflower white. 



Sour milk will make a 
lighter cake then sweet 
milk. 



A neat trick! Cream your 
butter, cinnamon, and 
sugar all together and 
spread it on the toast; no 
mess, and delightful 
cinnamon toast results. 

FOR AN ENJOYABLE 
MEAL - SPECIALIZING 
IN CHARBROILED 
STEAKS, MEXICAN FOOD 
AND LOW, LOW PRICES 
TRY THE 




400 LASKIN ROAD 



demonstrates just a fraction 
of the egg's versatility. 

The Spinach Omelet 
Roulade can fit into a meal al- 
most any time of the day or 
night. And it's just different 
enough to be worth trying. 
This (Hnelet is so fluffy that it 
can be filled, rolled, sliced 
and served jelly-roll style. It 
gets its pizzaz from the spin- 
ach and cheese filling. 

The second recipe takes 
eggs to the final course as a 
Fruited Dessert Omelet. You 
start your omelet in a nine- 
inch skillet on top of the stove 
and then move it to a pre- 
heated oven to complete the 
process. Use strawberry, 
plum or raspberry jam as 
your filling. Garnii^ with 
fresh strawberries. 

SPINACH OMELET 
ROULADE 

1 bunch fresh spinach 
<Note) 

4 tablespoons butter 

V'2 tablespoons fine dry 
bread crumbs 

6 large fresh eggs 

4 teaspoon cream of tartar 

m teaspoons salt 

3 level tablespoons flour 

1 cup milk 

^4 cup shredded Danish 
cheese (St. Paulin, Muen- 
ster or your favorite) 

Wash spinach and remove 
stems. Cook spinach in water 
dinging to leaves, just until 
tender. Drain well, {M-essing 
out all excess water and chop 
fine. (Should be two-thirds 
cup). Lightly oil a jelly roll 
pan (10 X 15 x 1-inch) and line 
bottom with a sheet of waxed 
paper cut to fit. ^read paper 
witti 1 tablespoon butter, and 
sprinkle with crumbs. Sepa- 
rate eggs. Beat whites with 
cream of tartar and V^ tea- 
spocm salt until stiff. With 
same beater, beat yolks well. 
Slowly pour over egg whites, 
while gently folding in care- 
fiilly. 'nim into prepared pan, 
and spread level with spatula. 
BakeiAi moderate oven (350 
degrees F. ) about 12 minutes, 
until puffed and very lightly 
browned on top. Meanwhile, 
melt remaining three table- 
spoons butter, and blend. in 
Qour. Stir in milk and remain- 
ing ^4 teaspoon salt. Cook, 
stirring untU sauce boils and 
thickens. Add spinach and V^ 
cup cheese, and stir over low 
heat until cheese melts. When 
omelet is baked, loosen edges 
with spatula, and turn omelet 
out onto sheet of waxed paper. 




SPECIMENS 



Pioffl Micro-mounts to Cabinet 
Ate. Choice Vi^ia materials. 



RINGS-]V-THI1VG§ 



JEWELRY • LAPIDARY EQUIPMENT 

HAYGOOD SHOPPING CENTER Phone 460-1 016 

1063 Independence Blvd. Virginia Beach, Virginia 23455 



The Virginia Beach Chapter of the Amerioin Asso- 
ciation of Medical Assistants sponsors a Bloodmobile 
on June 6, 1974 - 11:00 A.M. to 5 P.M. - North 
Wing Lounge — General Hospital of Va. Beach. Help 
us reach our quota of 200 pints and receive a $5.00 
gift certificate to "That Steak Place." Sign up with 
any Medical Assistant now! 



H\SIS Ml \\> ( IN l( OR(, 



SIMIELE FUNERAL HOME 



( ALL MRS. \ ICIOH. P SLMll 1,1 , UI.DNJ 
BKTWLLN 10 AM) NOON :!iO:.i_' 



# 



^ 



BEST PICTURE 
OF THE YEAR 



A GEORG£ IKyt Hll I (^HM 

THE STING 



N 



WINNER OF 7 ACADEMY AWARC^ 



..adit 

IcAesIs 

aliffle 

ConHdence 




Carefully peel oft paper frmn 
omelet and spread mnelet 
with hot spinach muture. Rdl 
up as for jeUy roll and place 
on serving platter. Spriidde 
top witii remaining */* cup 
ch^se. Cut into dices to 
serve. Makes about six sew- 
ings. 

(Note) Or, cook ^ (12- 
ounce ) package frozen 

qnnachi / 

FRUITED 
DESSBIT (NHELET 

4 large fresh eggs 
*/i teaspoon salt 
^ terapoon cream of tartar 
2 tidjl^poons sugar 
*/t teaspoon grated orange 
peel 
1 tablespoon butt^ 



One-tlurd to v^ cup sUmh 
berry, plum or raspberry 
Jam 

Powdered sugar 

Fresh strawberries and 
leaves (optional) 

Separate eggs. Beat wMtte 
with salt and cream ot tartar 
until stiff. Beat in sugar, 1 ta- 
blespoon at a time. With same 
beater, beat yolks and orange 
peel together uiUil thick and 
ligtit. Pour over egg wUtes, 
geirtly folding in untfl mixture 
is well blended. Melt butter in 
a 9-iiich skillet, tilting pan to 
butter sides. Turn in the ome- 
let mixture, and cook over 
moderate heat about two adn- 
utes. Place in preheated mod- 
erate oven (350 degrees F.). 
Bake IS to 20 minutes, until 
well puffed and lightly 



browned on top. Loosoi edges 
with 9abila. C^t pert way 
throu^ omelet aotiss center 
with a sharp knUe. Spnad 
jam over tower half. Fold the 
other side over jam, and sUde 
out onto serving plate. Dust 
top thickly with powdered 
stigar. Mark top of omelet 
with a h(H metal skewer, and 
decorate with a few fresh 
strawberries and leaves, tf 
desired. Makes two to tb-ee 
servings. 

Variatioa: Softoi a 3-ounce 
package cream cheese. Beat 
in 1 tablespoon eadi li^t 
cream (or inUk), and sugar, 
and 1^ teaspoons lemon 
juice. Spread over omelet in- 
stead of jam. Serve plain or 
topped with sliced fresh 
strawberries, if desired. 



r 



California Stew 

(Sarvea 6) 



" ^ clip 'it' cook 




2 tablatpoons salad oil 

.2 pounds boned chuck, 

cut into 1>^-lnch cubes 

2 teaspoons salt 

1 tablespoon each 

paprika and vinegar 

1 teaspoon dried majoram 

2 bay leaves 

1 cup water or beet bouillon 

4 pared medium potatoes, halved 

8 medium white onions, halved 

4 pared medium carrots, halved 

2 celery stalks. 

cut into 2-inch pieces 



HEAT OIL in pressure cooker or saucepan. Brown 
beet. Add all items except vegetables. 

PREPAflATION ALTERNATIVES 
PRESSURE COOKER on electric surface unit, or 
electric pressure cooker: Cook at 15 pounds pres- 
sure lor 8 minutes. Reduce pressure immediately 
by placing pan under cold running water. Add 
vegetables, cook at IS pounds pressure lor an 
additional 12 minutes. Reduce pressure immedi- 
ately. Never till pressure cooi<er more than '-t lull 
LARGE SAUCEPAN on electric surface unit: Pre- 
pare as directed, adding an additional 1 cup liq- 
uid. Simmer meal 1 hour and 45 minutes, add 
vegetables: cook an additional 30 to 35 minutes 
or until vegetables are fork'tender. 

A GUIDE TO CONSERVE ENERGY 
COOKING IN a covered saucepan on an electric 
range is 20 to 40°o fess eilicient than cooking in a 
pressure cooker. 





22nd BIG WEEK 

«:«■ lit »jt ?« w^e 



I «»»tt %i» * 



MRS. GATES 

Gates-Fussell 

Susan Ray Fussell and 
Thomas Wayne Gates were wed 
Saturday at Larchmont United 
Methodist Church. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Elbert Ray 
Fussell of Virginia Beach. Tte 
bridegroom is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Thomas Algie Gates of 
Norfolk. 

Margaret Dean Cummings 
was her sister's matron of 
honor. Bridesmaids were 
Sandra Shaffer, Patricia Gates 
and Marjorie Bryan. 

James Willis was his 
nephew's best man Ushers 
were Robert Brandy, John Eley 
and Bryan Graves. 

Bethny Cummings was flower 
girl, and Jacksoti Davis was 
ring t>earer. 

The couple will reside in 
Norfolk. 

Olson- Wommack 

Sara Malinda Wommack 



%% 



HAPPY 



ff 




. BEACH PrtS: UP 

RHODODiNDRONS * 
IN THI SMOKIES 

Junt 710 

CANADA EAST 

iufie 22-30 

PENN DUTCH COUNTRY 

June 28-30, Aug. 9 11 

CENTRAL RMWA & 

WAIT OISMY WORID 

July 7 13, Aug. 4-10 

OOlMNWESt 

July 21 Auguit 17 

POCONO MOUNTAINS 

SUN N' FUN 
July 28-31 

lEIKSMin 

SUMMER EESTIVAl 

August 10- 16 

NOTt Ooy-by-Oor lfin»rarln 
Avollobit on R*qu»(l 

MR. HAPPY 

TRAVEL SERVia 

mnmvmmamtmumi. 

583-4346 



MRS. OLSON 



became the bride of Larry 
Wayne Olson Saturday at First 
Presbyterian Church. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Winston 
Wommack of Virginia Beach. 
The bridegroom is the son of 
Hazel I. Olson of Yakima, 
Wash., and the late Wayne 
Olson. 

Kathryn Winston Wommack 
was her sister's maid of honor. 
Suzan. Bishop was 

bridesmaid, and Kate Bishop 
was flower girl, 

Thtmias Terrill Wommack 
was best man. Ushers were 
Robert Willis Bishop and 
Thomas White. 

The couple will reside in 
Denver. 

DeLoach-Colee 

Susan Elizabeth Colee and 
Gary Lane DeLoach were wed 
May 11 at the chapel of the 
Naval Amphibious Base, Little 
Creek. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Cmdr. and Mrs. C. Stewart 
Colee of Virginia Beach. The 
teidegroom is the swi of Mr. 
and Mrs. Sterling Ray DeLoach 
of Virginia Beach. 

Susan Kii^ery was matron 
of honor. Sarah Colee was her 
sister's maid of honor. 
Bridesmaids were Nancy 



MRS. DeLOACH 



Bradlee, Connie Brown, Susan 
Bannerman, Lynne CWee, Patti 
Shfw. and Liza Myers. 

Sterling DeLoach was his 
son's best man. Ushers were 
John Barkey, Bill Ferrell, Kent 
Blackwell, Brock Macon, Stuart 
Stevenson, Mike Baecher, 
Ralph Shaw and Glenn Kingery. 

Shebon Stolle was flower girl, 
and David Colee was ring 
bearer. 

The couple will reside in Ohio. 

Carlson-White 

Karen Elizabeth White 
became the bride ol Christopher 
Randolph Carlson Monday at 
Eastern Shore Chapel. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Mrs. R(*ert C, Courain of 
Virginia Beach and the late 
Capt. Donald Foster White. The 
bridegroom is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Joel F. Carlson of 
Virginia Beach. 

Kathi Lynne White was her 
sister's maid of honor. 
Elizabeth Alice Courain was 
bridesmaid. 

Anthony Mauser was best 
man, and ShejAerd Kaylor was 
groomsman. Ushers were 
Bernard Barrow and Noel E. 
Nelson. 

The couple will reside in 
Michigan. 




FOR THE FUTURE 



. . "THE CHILD MOLESTER," 
a film, will be shown at the 
annual meeting of the 
Tidewater CouikU of Bhotk 
Mother Wednesday at 7:30 
p.m. at Little Creek 
Elementary School, 7900 
Tarpon Place, Norfolk. The 
public is invited to attend. 



FIELD DAY activities will be 
today at Bayside Junior High 
School, 965 Newtown Road. 
Included will be a play, "Up the 
Down Staircase," presented by 
the drama department at4 p.m. 
Admission is 50 cents for adults 
and 25 cents for students. A 
spaghetti dinnei' will be served 
in the cafeteria from 5:30-7 p.m. 
Tickets are $1.50 tor adults, $1 
(or students and 50 cents for 
childrea A talent show in the 
auditiHium at 8 p.m. concludes 
the day's evoits. Tickets are $1 
fw adults and 50 cents for 
students. 



TWO FILMS in Alistair 
Cooke's "America" series will 
be shown today at 1:30 p.m. at 
Tidewater Community College, 
Virginia Beach campus, 
building 252, spwisored by the 
Virginia Beech Arts Center and 
the Virginia Museum. 
Admission is free. 



PHONE BOOKS to help in the 
recycling project of the 
Suburban Junior Woman's Club 
are being collected by C&P 
Telephone Co. at its Military 
Circle office. Old phone 
directories also may be sent to 
school with any Virginia Beach 
public school student before 
Tuesday. 



SAM CLAY, president of the 
Virginia Beach Arts Center, will 
preside at a business meeting of 
Arts Center members Thursday 
at 8 p.m. at the center, 1916 
Arctic Ave. Old and new 
Wsiness will be reviewed, 
refreshments will be served. 



BACK BAY Civic League 
members are invited to the 
regular league meeting 
Thursday at 8 p.m, at Creeds 
Fire Station on Morris Neck 
Road, The oublic also is invited. 
Refreshments will be served. 



"INHERIT the Wind" opens 
Friday at the Little Theatre of 
Virginia Beach, 24th Street and 
Barberton Drive, and will {day 
Fridays and Saturdays through 
June 8. Ticket information and 
reservations may be obtained 
by calling the Uieatre at 428- 
9523. 



THE QUEEN of the Plaza 
Volunteer Fire Department, 
Lifesaving and Rescue Squad 
Carnival, 16-year-old Rd>ecca 
Hart, will be crowned Saturday 
at 8 p.m. at Princess Anne 
Plaza Shipping Center. The 
carnival at the shopping center 
continues until Saturday. 



FILMS for chikirei Saturday 
at 11 a.m. at two branch 
libraries are "Magic (rf 
Disneyland" and "Magic 
Michael" at the Virginia Beach 
branch plus "The EJhiperor's 
Nightengale," "How the 
Elephant Got His Trunk" and 
"The Little Engine That Could" 
at the Windsor Woods Inranch. 



A CARNIVAL Saturday (9 
a.m.-5 p.m. at Windsor Woods 
Elementary School, 233 
Presidential Blvd., will feature 
games, pony rides, swings, a 
spacewalk, crafts, food and 
Cicero the^^ Clown. Proceeds 
from the carnival, sponsored by 
the Windsor Woods PTA, will 
help buy educational equipment 
for the^^ school. 



ST 
c 

NUTONE 

RF58 

Attic Vent Fan 


AY COOL THIS SUMMI 
ind SAVE MONE"! 


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NOW ONLY 


Thermostaticalli 
Controlled 


PLUS 
INSTALLATION 
REG, $98.95 


One Year 
Guarantee 


OFFER GOOD 

UNTIL 
JUNE 30. 1974 




D & J SERVICE CO. 

CALL 427-1013 


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Wc^nya 
srileni.il 


rnmi^fr fae of Nntooc nlaami, pn^e door a^mea, food emit 
oor eUaes nd T.V. wtenn ^fttm*. 


n.vscaun 



TOE MAY luncheon of the 
Virginia Beach Juniw Woman's 
Chib is Saturday at 11 a.m. at 
That Seafood Place. Luncheon 
is $3.75 for guests and $2.50 for 
members. 

MEMORIAL DAY services 
will be conducted A^onday at 11 
a.m. at the Veteraitt Memorial 
of Woodlawn Memorial 
Gardens, 6309 Vir^nia Beach 
Blvd., Norfolk. The Cox High 
School Marching Band and 
NJROTC umt will participate. 
The public is invited to 
participate in the observance 
and view the parade which 
forms at lo a.m. at the comer of 
Newtown Road and Virginia 
Beach Boulevard. 



HIE MAY SOCIAL of the 

Navy Wives Clubs of America, 
Chapter 241, Little Creek, will 
be Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. in 
buikiing 3342 at the Naval 
Amphibious Base, Little Creek. 
Casual dress is suggested. All 
wives (rf enlisted personnel are 
invited. 



FOR THE RECORD 



NEW OFFICERS of the 

Princess Anne Plaza Civic 
League for 1974-75 were elected 
at the league's recent meeting, 
Joel Smith was re-elected 
(H-esident. Other (rfftcers are: 
first vice-president. Gene 
Fowler; corresponding 
secretary, Carrie Rockefeller; 
treasurer, Pat Klimzynski; 
recording secretary. Tawny 
Moller. New board members 
are Bob Phillips and Darrel 
Hughes. 



THE MARCHING CavaUers 
(rf Princess Anne High School 
earned three trc^hies at the 
recent Apple Blossom Festival 
in Winchester. The band woti 
second place trophy in the 
concert division, a first place 
for superior rating and a second 
place in marching competition. 
The band is directed by Ronald 
Collins. 



INSTALLATION ''of officers 
for 1974-75 of the Chesapeake 
Art Guild was held recently. 
The officers are: iN-e$ident, 
Virginia Holmes (Chesapeake); 
vice-president, Michael Burke 
(Norfolk) ; recording secretary, 
Bette Collings (Virginia 
Beach); breasurer, Sara Jane 
Davis (Norfolk) and 
corresponding secretary, Betty 
Boyce (Chesapeake). Ed Liles 
was appointed 
parliamentarian. 



THE ANNUAL meeting and 
installation of offkers of the 
Adam Thoroughgood Chapter, 
Daughters of the American 
Revolution, was held recently. 
Officers installed are: regent, 



Mrs. William H. AusUv Jr.; 
vice-regent, Mrs. Rice Vniell; 
chaplain, Mrs. F.L, Salomon; 
recording secretary, Mrs, 
William Newby; treasurer, 
Mrs, Massie B, White; 
registrar, Mrs. Milton W, 
Thorpe; historian, Mrs. Edgar 
A. Tugman, and librarian, Mrs. 
Harvey 0, Sargent 



"THE IMPEACHMENT of 

Andrew Johnson" was the 
progam given by Ruth Jordan 
at the recent meeting <rf ttie 
Pickett-Buchanan Chapter, 
United Daughters ofv the 
Confederacy. New officers 
repented by the nominiting 
committee will be: prtt^nt, 
Mrs. Jordan; first >Vice- 
(resident, Mrs. John WiHiams; 
recording secretary, |Mrs. 
Davkl Bailey; treasure-^] Mrs. 
Ahrah Pritchard; record^ of 
crosses, Mrs. H.L. CiHuxi); 
registrar, Mrs. H.J. I^vvtim. 
Mrs. A.B, Pritchard wiU^erve 
as third vice-president aikfMrs, 
J.O. Wekh as historian, s ' 



A CANDLELIGHT service 
highlighted the recejit 
instaUation of officers of the 
Navy Wives Clubs (rf America, 
Chapter 241, at the chapel if the 
Naval Amphibious Base, Little 
Creek. Joan Forgacs was 
chosen member of the year. 
New officers are: present, 
Barbara Hellwig;? vice- 
president, Donna Griffin; 
recording secretary, Mary 
Shoultz; corresilonding 
secretary, Faye Akiin; 
treasurer, Sylvia Benson; 
chaplain, Dorothy Wilson, and 
parliamentarian, Cora Bcrden, 



A PUZZLE making contest 
was won by Den 4 during Cub 
Scout Pack 434's recent 
meeting, Robert Coble 
graduated into Boy Scout Troop 
434, while Robert Harris, Ricky 
Hildebrand, Billy Maull and 
Kevin Sanders were inducted as 
new Bobcats. Richard 
Hildebrand was welcomed as a 
new committee member. 



THE CAVALIER Junior # 
Woman's Club recently held its 
annual installation bampiet and 
dance at the Ramada Inn 
Oceanfront Diane B(Hidurant 
was named outstanding junior 
and Beverly Mele outstanding 
new member. New officers are: 
president, Mrs, Bobby M. 
Jarman; first vice-president, 
Mrs. Bondurant; second vice- 
pffesident, Mrs, Angelo Mele; 
secretary, Mrs. Charles C, 
Ellis, and treasurer, Mrs. 
William R, Waller. 



Items may be mbmitted to Sim 
Dial by maU, Pletae trtaU your not- 
ice to Sun LM, Vir^nia Bench Sun 
138 Rotemont Road, Virginia Beach 
Vtt. 23452. Deadline is noon Z^- 
day prior to Oie weeic of public- 
ation. 




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•5- 

ORIENTAL ARTS & CURIOS 



HOURS: 10 a.m. TO 5:0Q pjn. 
CLOSED SUN. bMON. 

716 FIRST COLONIAL 
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(Behind McD<Miald.<i un Laskin Kd.) . 




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DAILY - 8 'TIL 6:30 



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Ura Sun-WodnMday, May 22, 1974-Pags B-3 



Oldies 




i i 



on hymn hitparade 



The old and new 



"The Old Rugged Cross" is 
not quite so rugged atQrmare. 

It has been nosed out on the 
iiymn hit parade by a song that 
is not even in most hymnals — 
"How Gitfflt Thou Art." 

"The Old Rugged Cross" is 
still in there as No. 2, however, 
in a national poll conducted by 
The Christian Herald, an 
independent Protestant 
monthly. 

Actually, the old-time 
favorite began slipping in 1968, 
when a Christian Herald poll 
put it in third place — after 
"What a Friend We Have in 
Jesus," which was No. 1, and 
"How Great Thou Art," which 
was 2. 

IN THE MOST recent 
sampling of public opinion 
about a total (rf 492 hymns, 
"Amazing Grace" ranked third 
after "How Great Thou Art" 
and "The Old Rugged Cross." 
Next came 'What a Friend We 
Have in Jesus" and "In the 
Garden." Another old favwite, 
"Rock (rf Ages," was sixth. 

Of specialnote was the fact 
that while there is much "new . 
music" in the church, none (rf it 
has set people to humming like 
the old-timers have and, 
therefore, none has turned up on 
the lists of individuals and 
church members who 
participated in the poll. 

THK POPULARITY of "How 
Great Thou Arf ' was attributed 
by the editors of The Christian 
Century to the Billy Graham 
Crusades, which feature the 
song as presented by the choir 
and used in congregational 
singing over radio and 
television and during mass 
religious rallies. 

"How Great Thou Art" first 
turned up on a Christian Herald 
hymn poll in I960, when it 
placed fourth. By 1968 it was in 
second place. This year it was 
several lengths in front. 



receiving about twice as many 
votes as "The Old Rugged 
Cross." 

*k& lot "Amazing Grace," the 
editors theorized that it might 
owe its new popularity to the 
pop version "which introduced 
it to many young people as well 
as to oldsters who had somehow 
missed it along the way." 

THE FACT THAT there were 
nearly 500 hymns in the poll 
indicates how difficult a task 
the compilers of hymnals have 
in dmng Uieir editorial work, 
The Christian Herald observed. 
It noted that some churches 
solve the problem by having two 
hymnbooks — one for formal 
Sunday morning services and 
the other "for more rousing 
Sunday evening or week-night 
meetings w l^mn sings." 

A reader from Pennsylvania, 
whose No.l choice was "What a 
Friend We Have in Jesus," 
wrote that she sings herself to 
sleep with hymns every ni^t 
because "when I can't sleep, 
these hymns are a comfort to 
me." 

Others she sings are "0 
Jesus, I Have Promised" and 
"How Great Thou Art". 



FROM VIRGINIA came a 
note saying that despite its 
popularity, "How Great Thou 
Art" is not in most hymnals. 

"Hymns, like other songs, to 
be widely sung must be 
singable," The Christian Herald 
noted. "That's a point liturgists 
and professional hymnologists 
might keep in mind. 

"When you have an acres-big 
feeling inside that will explode 
if you don't let it out, only a 
singable hymn with a beat gives 
release. And when it's a feeling 
too deep for boisterous song, 
the sedate, stately hymn 
handles it best. What does it 
add up to? We need both." 



TIMES CHANGE AND churches do, 
too. London Bridge Baptist Church 
on Potters Road has two towers, the 
spherical one on the old sanctuary 
(foreground) and the new spire on 



the modern sanctuary in the rear. 
Drivers on the Virginia -Beach- 
Norfollt Expressway can glimpse 
the new spire through a trough of 
trees. (Sun photo by Rod Mann) 



I'm 



CHURCH 
NOTES 



ST. FRANCIS Episcopal 
Church recently welcomed 
throi^h confirmation three 
adults, Lois Cox, Carol 
Gillikin and Margaret 
Slater. Twenty youths also 
were confirmed at (he 
church. 

A PAPER DRIVE to raise 
money for a trip to Lake 
Junaluska will be held by 
the Methodist Youth 
Fellowship of Foundry 
United Methodist Church. 
Church members are asked 
to save newspapers, 
magazines. Junk mail and 
paper bags to be picked up 
Saturday. 

A REv/vAL is now going 
on at St. Andrew's United 
Methodist Church in 
Larkspur, 717 Tucson Road. 
The revival continues 
through "rhursday. The Rev. 
John A. JacKenry, pastor of 
First United Methodist 
Church in Newport News, 
will coiyluct revival ser- 
vices. Services feature old- 
time hymn singing, 
preaching beginning at 7:30 
each ev^ing and music by 
children, of the church Th^ 
Rev. Whitaker W. Shelton, 
pastor, invites the com- 
munity t^ attend. ^"^ 

A SPEtlAL pr(^ram with 
' Jjrt and Phyllis Bailey will 
be held in the sanctuary of 
Virginia Beach. United 
Methodist Church. 207 18th 
St., Stan<|iy at 7:30 p.m. 

A FeU-OWSHIP supper 
sponsored by Foundry 
U nited yae tl iod is t Church, 
aoi Virginia Beach Blvd.. 
will be June 1 at 6 p.m. An 
outside cookout will be 
followed by a gospel musical 
' program featuring the New 
Reality Severs. 

UNITED METHODIST 

men will serve the annual 
banquet of the United 
Methodist Women May 29 at 
6:30p.m. in tlK social hall of 
Virglraa Beach United 
Methodist Church, 207 18th 
St. All womw of the church 
are invited. 



Need help? Phone-in TV 

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featuring 

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8 PM weeknights 






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ckuRchES 




(VIaIiE STRONq 



• • 



COMMUNITIES 



A THOUGHT 




TODAY 
MAY 22, 1974 ^ 

, By Rev. Harold Hulion 
Emmanuel Tabernacle Church 
\(United Pentecostal Church) 

"And when the day of 

Pentecost was fully 

I eome, ...they were all filled 

with the Holy Ghost, and 

began to speak with (Mher 

tongues. They were all 

Umazed. saying. What 

I meaneth this? What shall we 

do?" 

Acls2; 1,4,12.37. 
'"Then Peter said,' Repent, 
I and be baptized every oie of 
.you in the name c( Jesus 
(Christ for the remission «rf 
sins, and ye shall receive tlK 
' gift of the Holy Ghost... The 
I iromise ^ unto you." 

Acts2:M,39. 
Never give up on Religion 
until you have tried 
'Pentecost. Attend a 
Pentecostal Church "on 
Pent^mtal Sunday. 



Emmanuel Tabernacle 
Church-UPC 

157 Morrison Ave, 

(i block orr S. Lynnhtven Rd.) 
Rev, Harold Hulion-Pistor 
Phone: 340-7333 



Blf^KE UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 

4300 Shore Drive 
Vi. Beach - 4*4-2423 

Byron S. Hallstead 
Minister 

SUNDAY SERVICES 

Church School 9:30 AM. 
Mcxnii^ W(»ship 1 1:00 A.M. 
VISTORS ARE WELCOME. 



.^rnTDEWATE R tENfR^tr 
CHURCH^FTHE 
NAZARENE 

Rev. David Holstein, Pastor 

5514 Parinment Hi. 497-S703 
Sunday School Hr. ■ 9:45 A.M. 
Hour of Triumph 10:50 A.M. 
liniOT, Youth, A Adult 
Mlow*ip ■ 6:00 P.M. 
Hour of In^iration - 7:00 P.M. 
WedMiday Hid-wert 
l^4rt 7:30 P.M. 



ROCK CHURCH 

640 KempsvUle Rd. Ph. 499-3727 
' Virginia Beach 

Sunday 

Sunday Schael t:4S A.M. 

Morning Worjhip 11:90 A.M. 

e<id}nln9 Wer«liH» »:M P.M. 

Tuesday 

Morning Wortllip >«:J0 A.M. 

Evefiina Worship 7:M P.M. 

TiArsday 

Morning Worship 10;W A.M. 

Evtnina Worship 7:W PM 

Nwrstry AvailaWa 
PASTORS 

Rev John Oimonai R»y AnnGimonat 



1 



ST 



Assembly of God 



FIRSTCMUHCH 
OF CHRIST 
SCIENTIST 
Virginia Beach 
1341 Laskin Rd. 
Sunday 
Church Service 11:00 
Sunday School 11:00 



AM 
AM 



Meeting i:00 



weanesaay 

Testimony 
PM 

Christian Scientist 
Reading 'Room 

( same address as above) 
Monday thru Saturday 

n :00am to 3:00 PM 

Also Open Tuesday Evening 

7:00 PM to ♦:0«PM 

Everyone is welcome to 
Study, Borrow, or Bvy 
Authorixed Christian 
Scientist titeratore and tlie 
King Jamet Version of Mo 
Bible. 

Christian ScimHst Monitor 
is also available. 



(C(Mnet Va. Beach Hvd. 

Oceana Blvd.) 

S. Briler, Paaiof 

::y: 42W297 



EMMANUEL BAPTIST 

CHURCH 
4750 Baxter Rd.-Va. Beach 
i^tor: W. F. Gtmditafr 
Phone: 497-4208 

^nday School: 9:45 A.M. 

(AUAfe*) 
Pleaching Service: 11:00 A.M. 
Evening Preaching: 7:00 P.M. 

Wednesday 7:30 P.M. 
r^er A BiUc StHdy 
Vaatd Voudi Actmtiet 



WELCOME TO WORSHIP 
AND WITNESS WITH 

ST. MARK A.M.E. 
CHURCH 

J. Alton Butts, Minirter 
1740 Potters Rd. Vir|ini« 
Beach, Va. 

»udy Phone 428-1330 
Oiurch Sdiool • 9:30 A.M. 
Divine Wordiip - )1:W A.M.| 
W^nesday - 7:W) P.M. 
11m IteiAii^ Mtairtry 
WeteeiAay ■ 8:W P.M. 
1^ Church at rnyet 



HERE ARE The Christian 
Herald's hymn hit parades of 
several years to show how 
tastes change — slightly — and 
how solid the old favorites 
have remain^: 

1953: (1) "The Old Rugged 
Cross" (2) "What a Friend We 
Have in Jemis" (3) "I Love to 
Tell the Story" (4) "In the 
Garden" (S) "Rock of Ages." 

1980: (1) "The Old Rugged 
Cross" (2) "What a Friend We 
Have Jesus" (3) In the Garden,' 
(4) "How Great Thou Art" (5) 
"Sweet Hour of Prayer." 

The 1968 list coilained the 



same five but in slightly 
diffo-ent order, with "Whet a 
Friend We Have in Jesus" rated 
as No. 1. 

THE CURRENT LIST of the 

Uq) 10 is as follows: 

(1) "How Great Thou Art" 
(2) "The Old Rugged Cross"(3) 
"Amazing Grace" (4) "What a 
Friend We Have in Jesus" (5) 
"In the Garden" (6) "Rock <rf 
Ages" (7) "Sweet Hour of 
Prayer" (8) "Blessed 
Assurance" (9) "Abide With 
Me"(10) "A Mighty Fortress." 

The great old Sunday school 
hymn "Onward, Christian 



Soldiers" came in 12th in the 
latest poll. 

As a sidelight, The Christian 
Herald reported the favorite 
hymns of the inmates of the 
Florida State Prison. "Amazing 
Grace" was first, followed in 
order by "How Great Thou 
Art," 'The Old RujiRed Cross 
and "What a Friend We Have in 
Jesus" tied for third place; 
"Pass Me Not, O Gentle 
Savior;" "In the Garden" and 
"Softly and Tenderly" tied for 
fifth place. 

Not much difference from the 
favorites of those who do their 
singing in church. 



NEWSPAPER 

CARRIER BOYS 
AND GIRLS 

MUST BE 12 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER 
If you would like to earn extra 
money and live in any of the 
areas listed below, call 
486-3430, Monday thru Friday 

THeSE ARE THE AREAS 
WHERE CARRIERS 
ARE NEEDED 



OATEWOOD PARK 
REGENCY APTS. 
SELLAMY MANOR 
WOODHURST 
CARDINAL ESTATES 
WASHINGTON SQUARE 
LYNNWOOD 
KEMPSViUE MEADOWS 
CHANTICLEAR APTS. 
GREAT NECK MANOR 
CuM toda^ and atari aaming 

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BAYLAKE PINES 
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HAMPTONS 
NOTTINGHAM ESTATES 
TIMBERLAKE 
AVALON HILLS 
LYNNHAVEN SHORES 
LYNNHAVEN COLONY 
GREAT NECK ESTATES 
BIRDNECK VILLAGE 
that Bxtramonay right nowl 

Circulation 



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Phone - 497-3591 



CONTRACTORS 
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497-3516 



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Afp B4-Tht Sun-Wednesday, May 22, 1974 



i' 



They may be slimy, ugly, big or blind... 



By TOM GORDON 
Special to The Sun 

WASHINGTON - Some might call 
them understudies to the main at- 
tractions. 

Others might call them the less 
prominent members of a very prominent 
death row. 

But many persons, organizations, and 
some government agencies are working 
to get them a stay of execution. 

"They" are some of the 109 members 
of the Department of Interior's list of 
endangered species in the United States. 
But they do not bear such nationally 
familiar names as Southern b^d eagle, 
peregrine falcon, American alligator, <Mr 
Timber wolf. 



Tom Gordon Is a graduate student in the 
University of Missouri School of Journalism. 
He is currently studying in the school's Wash- 
ington Reporting Program. 



No, they are mwe likely to be the 
Devil's Hole pupfish, the Texas blind 
salamander, or the Iv(n7-billed or Eed- 
cockaded woodpeckers, or the Salt 
marsh harvest mouse, or even the 
Houston toad. These creatures don't lack 
defenders— they all have allies— it's 
just that they are a liitle less know than 
some (rf their prominent cousins. 

SOM£ OF THESE creatures are (rften 
confined to a small, localized habitat, so 
many persors outside the locality don't 
know about them. Some of the others, 
slimy, ugly big or tnilky have (rften 
caused fear and extermination rather 
than inspiration or protection. 

Others are unobtrusive, hardly 
flamboyant and their numbers are 
hardly enough to make their presence 
felt. 

Nevertheless, because these lesser: 
knowns — like their more prominent 
comrades-iire facing extinction in all 



or a portion of their range, they are on 
the endamgeaced list. Being on that list 
entitles them to protection in the form of 
various in-o^ams, laws and relations. 
(The most recent of these is the 1973 
Endangered Species Act, which enables 
the federal government to regulate the 
trade and hunting of endangered 
species. It also empowers Washit^n to 
work with ttie states to develop 
programs to protect a species and its 
habitat.) 

BUT BEING ELIGIBLE for protec- 
tion and receiving it are two different 
things. Whether some of these en- 
dangered animals receive annual 
protection funds depends on just how 
endangered they are as compared to 
other creatures. Federal officials 
determine this "degree of en- 
danger ment" by considering such 
factors as quaUty of habitat, birth and 
death rates. 



On the basis ot these critma, their 
existing knowledge and available funds, 
Interior Department officials have to 
make some bard clwi(»s. Thus some 
animals will receive protectton funds, 
while others have to wait. 

For instance, a sihall little-known 
endangered fish, which may produce 
several hundred eeas per year^ 
may recdve less consideration ttian the 

dwindling condor which mignt lay one 
egg every two years. 

But even where there is a will, 
scientists may not have the way or the 
time to st(^ the decline of certain 
animals. For example, the Houston toad 
and the Red wolf, both of which reside in 
Texas, seem bent on breeding with 
cousins and hybridizing Uiemselves out 
of existence. 

EVEN SOME CREATURES raised in 
captivity, like the Aleutian Canada 
goose, have found it hard to survive 



when returned to the wUd. 

■men too, there is the in-oUem of 

'^etUng funds to protect anim^ tlmt 

legislators know little if anything about. 

"Everybody knows the whooping 
crane, and we've had no |»'oblems 
getUng funcb annrqiHiated for it," says 
one inlCTior Departmwit biologist. "But 
when you go in and ask for funds to 
protect the Pecos gambusia (a fish) 
nobody knows what the hell you are 
talking about." 

A lot of peq>le have been taUcing — 
some quite heatedly — about the fate of 
the DevU's Hole pupfish. This bluish, 
inch-long fish lives in a spring-fed pool in 
a fe<ferally-protected area in Nevada 
near Death Valley. 

Interior Department officials estimate 
the fish's population to be between ^ 
and 800. They say the pupfish can 
maintain themselves if tney are not 
disturbed. 

(Continued on p. B-5) 



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Th« Sun— WBdnesday, M«y 22, 1974-Page B-5 



...but the creatures are worth saving 



(Contimud from p. B-4) 

RECENTLY. HOWEVER, the pupfish 
and federal (rfficials were disturbed 
when the pool's water level began to 
drop. A develqpo- who had purthased 
some lami around the federal preserve 
was siphoning irrigation water from the 
spring which sustained the pupfish in 
Devil's Hole. 

Federal officials won a court 
restraining order to halt the drainage, 
but the case is being appealed. Feelings 
on. both sides of the issue are demon- 
strated by local bumperstickers which 
reportedly say either "kill" or, "save" 
the pupfi^. 

No bumperstickers have emei^ed oa 
the plight of the Texas blind salaman- 
der, but some citizens groups and 
scientists are trying to save it. 

White, long-legged, and blind, this 
amphibian is found only in the deep wells 
and streams of one Texas county. Its 



' small population, already limited 
because females produce only a few 
eggs per year, has been further 
threatened through overcoUection, 
draining of its water habitat and ttie 
capping of its well ho|n^. 

TO COUNTER THESE hazards, the 
Texas Nature Conservancy has pur- 
chased and now guards one of the 
salamander's caves. And Texas recently 
enacted an endangered species law 
which, coupled with federal laws, may 
afford the salamander more protection. 

The Iv(n7-biUed and Red-codcaded 
woodpeckers also need protection, but 
some fear it may ah'eady be too late for 
the Ivory-billed. 

Larger, than a crow, with patches oi 
white on its wings, white lines on its neck 
and a distinctive white bill, the Ivory- 
billed woodpecker formerly nested in 
mature bottom land hardwoods in the 
South and Southwest. That habitat has 



been slowly destroyed over the years, 
and the Ivory-billed's decline has 
paralleted the trend. 

According to one Interior Department 
official, the bird is "one big question 
mark." Recoit sightings of the Ivory- 
billed have been reported, iMit none has 
beoi confirmed. 



HABITAT DESTRUCTION has 

brought the decline of the Red-cockaded 
woo(|)ecker, a smaller black-and-white- 
striped bird which has nested mainly in 
the South. (A red spot on the head of the 
male gives the Red-cockaded its name.) 
Hie birds like toTIest within mature pine 
trees infected with a fungal disease 
called heart rot. The trees are usually 
surrounded by a cluster of pines and 
hardwoods. 

Until recently, however, many logging 
companies, often with U.S. Forest 
Service approval, had been cutting down 
the heart rot pines, seeing little value in 



them. 

Now, under federal, state and private 
urging, some companies are bypassing 
the diseased pines. Only time will teU if 
these measures help tlve Red-cockaded, 
whose nationwide population is 
estimated to be between 3,000 and 10,000. 

Time may be running out for the Salt 
marsh harvest mouse, a dark-cpl(Mred 
rodent which used to range in the 
marshy areas up and down the San 
Francisco Bay area. Now Interior 
Department (rfficials report the mouse's 
numbers are reduced to small, isolated 
populations. The range has been reduced 
as the mouse's msurshy habitat has been 
dredged, diked or used for landfills. A 
planned housing development may 
reduce the range even further. 



HOWEVER, SOME OF the mice now 
roam in a state wildlife refuge, and 
others live on a Bay island purchased by 



a conservation group. Taking of the 
mouse is now |H-ohibited in California. 

Amidst the arguments about the fates 
of different animals, the same questions 
continually arise: Why are they im- 
portant? Why does it matter if these 
animals disappear? 

Scientists and citizens answer witti 
moral and scientific reasons. 

They say man has no right to draU^y 
creatures who share the earth, creatures 
he cannot re{dace. According to this 
thinking, when man makes the en- 
vironment intolerable for one animal, he 
has gone one step further toward making 
the environment intolerable for himself. 

Others cite the aesthetic value of 
many species, and still others cite the 
lessons each species can teach mankind. 
Scientists studying the Devil's Hole 
pupfish say this fish and its pupfish 
cousins date their beginnings back 11,000 
years to the waning days of the Ice Age 
in North America. 



SALE 



SPECIAL PRICES 

GOOD THRU MEMORIAL DAY 




%' 



1 X 12 Ponderosa 
Pine Shelving . . . 
Economicaiiy Priced 



I 



'H 






m 



H 



»s 






Now Only 



34 



< 



li. ft. 



Moore's Ponderosa Pine shelving is presanded. strong - 
read/ to point or stain to suit your needs! Add the 
Storage space you desire now from Moore's..And for a 
reotly fast job from start to finish, combine this character 
grained shelving with Moore's wrought iron shelf 
brackets... 




-^wst 



Briggs Wliite 2-Pc. 
Powder Room Set 
Sole Pric^AT... 



SALE 



RtguMy S2.89 



42 



50 



Save! Add this convenience now! Attractive two piece 
set includes both a 19" x 17" wall hung, led^ back 
vitreous china lavatory, and a modem silhouette, 
reverse-trap clo^t combination. Bought singly, the 
toilet at $35.94 & lavatory at $16.95 would total 
^2.95. Buy both now & save $10.59. 




Dress Up Your Room 
For Spring With 
Evans Rusticiona 
Panels • 



• • 



Regularly 9.50 



SALE 

99 



7 



Here's prefintshed, simulated wpodgrain plywood paneling 
that defies the most critical eye . . . You won't believe this 
lusterous woodgroin isn't the finest veneers from luxury 
woods. Choose from Stained Hickory, Natural Hickory or 
Natural Pecan ... Do it now and sove! 4'x8'x3/16". 



Double Bowl 
Stainless 
Steel Kitchen 
Sink Only... 

Regularly 28.59 




23 



99 



33" X 22" double bowl sink In gleaming satin finish stainless 
steel is lightweight - and self-rimmed for easy 1 man installation 
without careful fittings. A breeze for busy homenfwkers to keep 
cleani 32" x 21" rough-In. (Basket strainers extra). 

Single Lewr Faucet w/speay 21.88 




Safe Tempered Glan 
Tub EraMosurs 




«a.M 



34 



99 



Add SafMy With Wrought 
Iron Railingi From Mopre't 



4'Met. 



991 



Translucent, tempered safety 
^ass panels add draft-free 
privacy without fear of sud- 
den accidents in your bath. 
High luster anodlzed alumi- 
num frame with tovral t>ar. 
EMy to install. 



Preprlmed In Gloss welded 
wrought Iron railings are 
ready to finish to suit. Easy 
to4nstall 4 and 6 foot sect- 
iwis adjust to fit any Incline. 



evRns 



€vnns 

f^EDWOOD STAIN 




Protect Your Outdoor 

Furniture Witii Evans 
Redwood OiiStaiit 



Regularly 3.99! 



SALE 

66 

gallon 



2 



Here's a staining protection that will make your redwood fence 
and furniture look new again! Evans Redwood Stain restores the 
redwood finish to Redwood, gives the redwood look to lighter 
woods. Use indoors or out - Controls cracking, splitting & warp- 
ing, resists chalking. 




Add New Lawn Beauty 
Witli Landscape 
Pebbies From Moored 



Reguiariy 1.29! 



SALE 

99 



»} lb. bag 



Ihe these decorative Virginia River Pebbles to actsnt ^rdens, 
create walkways, hi^li^t specimen plantings — many attrac- 
tive landscaping effects. White Virginia River Pebbles refract 
ainli^t's burning rays, aid in mulching by conserving moisture, 
protect delicate root systems. Buy now & beautify your garden! 




Latex Patio & Deck- 
Choice Of Colors 



Reg. 
8.991 



699 



Ideal for concrtit and wood 
floori, indoori or out. Choice of 
6 colors In fttt-drytng liitx. t 
gallon covers approx. 450 iq. It. 




One Coat Latex Exterior 
House Paint 



Reg. 
8.99! 



6?? 



"the 8 yeat paint" - 14 hind- 
some colors plus Whita iHiuring 
Barium Mataborate to retard 
mildsw growth, all in super 
smooth latex! 



Choice Of Colors 
Alkytl Porch & Floor 



Reg. 
7.99! 



S!« 



High glossSikyd •nimcl is good 
protection for busy floors Iniidf' 
or out I S color choice applies 
smoothly over any prtviouiiy ' 
painttd surface. 




9 ' Rolltr • Tray Set 
With 2 Covtrt... 



Rag. 
3.801 



1 



aat 



Ribbed aluminum tray with not 
|uat t but 2 llully 1/2" rtap 
reusable polyeiler rollers 
suitable for any type of painti 





[B'D] 



8280 



Get Your 
Quality 

Black & Decker Tools 
from Moore's 

99 



7%" Circle Saw 



19 



Full 1.25 H.P. motor handles ^ foi/ghest jobs! 
Safety approved for both 7!4" ond d'/j" blades, 
with simplified bevel ond depth adjustments. Cut- 
ting depth; 90 deg., 2H", 45 deg., 1 '/•" 



Cordless Grass Trimmer 



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14 



99 



Includes nickel codmium batteries you con 
recharge over 500 times. 3" cutting area 
features 6 precision blades thot make 6,000 
Kissors-like cuts per minute! 



imL, 



CHESAPEAKE, 3224 Atkmtic Ave. VA. iEACH - VIRGINIA BEACH BOULEVARD 

S43.3S61 . OPm MON. Ii P«. 7:30 ojn. to • p-m. (1 Ml* wtH of MnwM Anim Ma«} Mwiw 340-«772 

TNUBm 7:30 O.III. to S:30 p.nu - SAT. 7:30 o.im to 4 pm OPBI DAILY 7:30 sjn. to • p^ SAtWDAYS 7:30 o-m. to 4 pm 




CORE'S 



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tati^liM^B tWI ^11 IPIJ Pll 



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&4— Th« Sun— Wednesday, May 22, 1974 




School Board, teachers agree 



Military 

honored 
at parade 



BffUiUkl^ 



Virginia Beach was the only Hampton Roads city 
to host an Armed Forces Day parade Saturday as 
the nation paused to honor the men and women who 
have served in the American military services. 

J. William Middenforf II. acting secretary of the 
Navy, pointed to the significance of the celebration 
in his Armed Forces Day message. He said, "Last 
year at this time we were thankful for the return of 
our prisoners of war and the end of American in- 
volvement in Vietnam. This Armed Forces Day we 
have just completed the first full year in more than 
a decade during which no American military * 
personnel have been involved in combat anywhere 
in the world." 

Maj. Gen. John R. McGiffert II, deputy chief of 
staff, resource management, U^S. Army Training 
and Doctrine Command, Ft. Monroe, served as 
grand marshal of the parade. 

The parade down Atlantic Avenue featured 
marching units and bands from the area's military 
installations and high schools. 

The public also was invited to view military 
equipment during open house at Ft. Story and the 
Little Creek Naval Amphibious Base. These 
demonstrations featured the various uses of am- 
phibian transportation vehicles, techniques of 
underwater demolition teams and explosive or- 
dinance disposal teams. The public was invited to 
tour various ships used in military operations at the 
Amphibious Base and travel the trails of Ft. Story 
in Army jeeps. 

* ******** 

Today is Chief Clyde "Sea Bee" Thomas's 53rd 
birthday. Last week "Sea Bee" Thomas, the last of 
the World War II "frogmen," retired after 31 years 
service in Underwater Demolition Teams (UDT), 
which included duty during three wars. Chief 
Thomas, a member of UDT 21 at Little Creek Naval 
Amphibious Base, was awarded the Meritorious 
Service Medal for his many years of faithful and 
continous duty. 

Chief Thomas became involved with the Navy' 
"frogmen" while serving as a Sea Bee at Camp 
Peary. During WW II he served in UDT operations 
in the Pacific, seeing action in the island invasions 
of Leyte, Luzon, Iwo Jima and Okinawa. He also 
participated in UDT reconnaissance of Japansese 
benches. 

He later served in UDT operations in the 
Mediterranean, todt part in surveying Greenland 
at Cape Christian and the Byrd Expedition to 
Antarctica. The government declined his request to 
serve in Vietnam due to his age. 

He also has set underwater charges in Hollywood 
films and had roles in the productions "Frogman" 
and "The Longest Day". 



The teacher salary controversies which 
erupted this year between teachers and the 
Vit-ginia Beach School Board should be 
eliminated in the future now that the teachers 
and the board have signed an agreement to 
begin formal collective bargaining in the fall. 

At Tuesday's School Board meeting, board 
members unanimously agreed to ratify an 
"agreement for recognition and bargaining" 
designating the Virginia Beach Education 
Association (VBEA) as the sole represen- 
tative of thecity's 2,600 teachers and setting tij^ 
the machinery for negotiations. 

Members of negotiating teams for the 
VBEA and the School Board worked together 
on the agreement and termed relations be- 
tween the two groups as "cordial" and "en- 
joyable." 

VBKA EXECUTIVE Director Richard 
Gordon hailed the agreement signing as "a 



monwntous day both for the School Board and 
the VBEA." 

The new agreement supersedes an 
agreement dating from 1968 which recognized 
the VBEA as the teacher's representative. 

The agreement contains a no-strike clause 
prohibiting the VBEA from engaging in ''any 
work stoppage." Virginia law prohibits public 
employes from striking. 

Other provisions in the agreement provide 
that negotiations will be conducted in closed 
sessions, publicity about negotiations will be 
issued jointly by both sides, if at all, and 
qualified mediators may be called in if the two 
sides cannot agree. 

Heading the School Board team which 
helped work <xit the agreement was Richard 
Hotvedt, a labor management relations 
specialist from Washington, QjQ^ Leading the 
VBEA team was Gene Truitt, director of the 
Virginia Education Association negotiations 



ROLL CALL 



division. 

IN OTHER business Tuesday the School 
Board: 

• Agreed to award the construction contract 
for the Bayside Elementary School expansion 
to Haycox Construction Co., which submitted 
a low bid of |l(»,000. 

f* Agreed to discontinue the prsrctice of- 
allowing parents to use credit cards to pur- 
chase school textbooks. Dr. E. E. Brickell, 
school superintendent, told the board that 
banks handling the credit card transactions 
would begin charging for their services on 
July 1. The services had previously been free. 

•Heard a report from Dr. Brickell that the 
school system has been included in the Artist 
in the Schools Pr<^ram sponsored by the 
Virginia Commission of the Arts and 
Humanities. The program send visiting art- 
ists to schools throughout the state. 



AUBURN DEAN'S 
U8T 

Hewitt E. Lovelace has been 
named to the dean's list fcr the 
winter quarter at Auburn 
Umvovi^, Ala. Mr. Lovelace k 
an undergraduate in the SdMol 
of Engineering. Students named 
to ttw dean's list rqH-esent the 
top Ave per cent, schdasticaUy, 
in dieir schools. - 



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WASHINGTON - Here's how 
area Members of Congress 
were recorded on major roll call 
votes May 9 through May 15. 

HOUSE 

PRODUCTIVITY COMMIS- 
SION: Passed, 238 for 
and 139 against, a bill (3.1752) 
to spend $2.5 million in fiscal 
1975 for the Presidential 
Commission on Productivity 
and Worl( Quality, and ttius 
Keep it alive. 

Ttie purpose of the 
commission is to increase 
productivity in the American 
economy by cutting down on 
waste or by promoting 
automation. In the past, the 
commission haS( for instance, 
demonstrated better ways for 
loading perishable vegetables 
and fruits into refrigerated 
train cars. 

Supporters argued that 
increasing productivity helps 
America compete with foreign 
manufacturers and is a key to 
halting inflation. Rep. John 
Rousselot (R-Calif) said, 
"Productivity is the mainspring 
of economic stability, growth 
and prosperity." 

Opponents argued that the 
commission duplicates . the 
work of existing agencies. Rep. 
Henry Gonzalez (D Texas) said 
the productivity commission is, 
therefore, "unproductive." 
Rep. H.R. Gross (R-iowa) 
called the bill "a piece of 
legislative trash." 

Reps. William Whitehurst (R 
2), Caldwell Butler (R-6) and 
Joel Broyhill (R-10) voted 
"yea." 

Reps. Thomas Downing (D- 
1), David Satterfield (D-3), 
Robert Daniel (R-4), W.C. 
Daniel (D-5), Kenneth Robinson 
(R-7), Stanford Parris (R-8) 
and William Wampler (R-9) 
voted "nay." 

EGG PRODU CTION : 

Passed, 238 for and 151 against, 
an amendment to force egg 
producers to pay the total cost 
of a proposed federal program 
to help them sell eggs. 

The amendment was 
attached to a bill (H.R. 12000) to 
let the Department of 
Agriculture advise egg 
producers an improved 
production methods and better 
advertising techniques. 

As a result of the amendment, 
the program will be financed 
only by a voluntary five-cents 
per case (30 dozen eggs) tax on 
large producers. 

The amendment changed 
language that would have 



permitted the Department of 
Agriculture to pay up to S100,000 
annually in administrative 
costs. 

Supporters argued that a 
government subsidy is hot 
needed because the per-cas^ 
tax Is expected to yield $7.5 
million annually for the 
program. 

Opponents argued that 
declining sales — since 1954 per 
capita consumption has 
dropped about 20 per cent — 
require the federal government 
to help egg producers as much 
as possible. Other opponents 
said egg producers should get 
subsidies similar to those given 
cotton and grain growers. 

Downing, Whitehurst, 
Satterfield, Robert Daniel, W. 
Daniel, Butler, Robinson, 
Parris, Wampler and Broyhill 
voted "yea." 

SENATE 

60 MPH SPEED LIMIT: 

Rejected, 29 for and 52 against, 
an amendment to let states 
raise their speed limites to 60 
milesper-hour. Since Jan. 2, 
states have been subject to the 
federally established ^5 m.p.h. 
speed limit. 

In rejecting the amendment, 
the Senate voted to continue the 
lower limit. The amendment 
was offered to S. 3267, an energy 
bill. 

Supporters argued that states 
should be permitted to adjust 
speed limits to local terrain, and 
said that 55 m.p.h. is too slow 
for long distance travel in 
western states. Sen. Robert 
Dole (R Kansas) said that "55 
m.p.h. is an unreasonably and 
frustratlngly low speed to 
travel." He also said the low 
limit hurts the trucking 
industry. 

In opposing the higher limit, 
Sen Robert -Stafford (R 
Vermont) said, "The higher 
speeds require more energy. 
The higher speeds wilt kill more 
people. Sen. Jennings Randolph 
(DWesf Virginia) cautioned 
against forgetting "that the fuel 
shortage was not a m id-winter 
hallucination, but rather a 
permanent fact of life." 

Sen. Wiliia Scott (R) voted 
"yea." Sen. Harry Byrd (I) 
voted "nay." 

SCHOOL AID: Passed, 56 for 
and 36 against, an amendment 
to give rural and suburban 
areas more Title i education aid 
in fiscal 1975 than they received 
in 1974, and urban areas less. 

The amendment was offered 
to S. 1539, the elementary and 
secondary education bill. 




Title I funds go to school 
districts with high populations 
of students from poor families. 

Here's the list of states that 
will lose money under the new 
formula, if it t>ecomes law; 

Alaska, California, 
Connecticut, Illinois, Iowa, 
Kentucky, Maine, 
Massachusetts, Michigan, 
Minnesota, New Jersey, New 
York, North Carolina, Ohio, 
Pennsylvania, Sourth Carolina, 
South Dakota, Utah, West 
Virginia and the District of 
Columbia. 

The amendment adopted a 
formula that the House already 
had passed.,. 

in general, senators voting 
for the amendment were those 
whose states would get more 
aid, and senators voting against 
were those whose states would 
lose money. 

Scott and Byrd voted vyea." 

BUSING: Tabled, 47 for and 
46 against, an amendment to 
prohibit long-distance busing of 
students to achieve racial 
balance in the schools. 

The amendment was offered 
to the elementary and 
secondary education bill. It also 
would have permitted schools to 
go to court to overturn certain 
existinq busina oians. 

The amendment would have 
prohibited busing students 
farther than the school next 
closest to their neighborhood 
school, and would have 
outlawed busing across school 
district lines unless the lines 
wer drawn for racial reasons. 

In voting to table the 
amendment, the Senate in 
effect killed it. 

Supporters of the move to 
table argued that the country 
has enough problems without 
getting further hung upon the 
issue of busing. The said busing 
is effective in breaking down 
social barriers, and for 
providing equal education. 

Those voting against the 
move to table argued that 
busing fires racial tensions, 
instead of calming them. Sen. 
Edward Gurney (R Florida) 
said there is "no consistent 
evidence of educational 
improvement as a result of 
busing." 

Scott and Byrd voted "nay." 

PARENTAL CONSENT: 

Rejected, 40 for and 43 against, 
an amendment to require 
parental consent before schools 
can force students to undergo 
certain "psychological" tests or 
participate in "innovative" 
programs. 
Scott and Byrd voted "yea. 



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Solution to puzzle on A4 



degrees 33'59" E which 

constitutes the boundary of 

Parcel IB to the north and 

■ Parcel 1-A to the south as 

Public Notice is herein 
given that the City Council of 
the City of Virginia Beach on 
June 3. 1974, at 2:00 f .M. at 
the Council Chambers, 
Municipal Center, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, will hold a 
public hearing and will 
consider adoption of an or- 
dinance pursuant to Section 
15.1-482 of the Code of 
Virginia, 1950, as amended, 
vacating portions of sub- 
division plats which constitue 
three easement for the in- 
stallation and-or main- 
tenance of utilities and 
drainage facilities on a 
parcel of land owned by 
Aspinwail's Richards 
Enterprises and located in 
the Bayside Borough of the 
City of Virginia Beach, said 
easements more particulSrly 
described as follows: 

(1) An easement 5 feet in 
width and 500.92 feet in 
length, covering that portion 
of Parcel 1-A which is south if 
the line with bearing S 82 



Council 

approves 

budget 



The Virginia Beach City 
Council Monday approved on 
second reading the $^.8 million 
budget for 1974-75. 

The budget is l2'/fe per cent 
higher than last year's budget. 
The Council, after briefing and 
study s^sions, increased the 
1974-75 budget by $515,000 over 
what City Manager Roger 
originally proposed. 

Despite pleas from school 
teachers, the Council did not 
send the school budget back to 
the Virginia Beach School 
Board with a request for higher 
teacher salaries. The budget 
includes $42,102,215 for 
education. City Manager Roger 
Scott told the Council Monday 
that if the budget were 
increased to allow for teacher 
pay hikes the tax rate for the 
city would have to be raised by 
at least 10 cents. 

This year's budget also 
includes funds for a Minimum 
Housing Inspections Division 
under the city administration. 
.The housing inspections are 
currently done by the Health 
Department, which is a state 
agency. 

The Arts and Humanities 
Commission is included in the 
city budget for the first time. 
The City's arts groups will 
receive $10,620. 



IFLINTSIONES 

•■r WEEKDAYS 8 AM 



JEWELRY - MINERAL SPECIMENS - EQUIPMENT 
CUTHNG MATERIAL - CUTTING INSTRUCTION 

RIMCHS-N-THINGS 

HAVGOOD SHOPPING CENTER 

1063 Independence Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 234S5 
Phone 460-1016 

WAYNE AND JACKIE CHRONISTER 
497-4723 



1>R. GENEVIEVE M. HALLER 

announces relocation 

of her Chiropractic offices to 

968 South Oriole Drive, Virginia Beach 

(off exit 7. right turn on Lasl<in fW:1 

For appointment Phone 428-3423 




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Mail notices of club meetings and an- 
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"tflSR/un 



The Sun 

138 Rosemont Road 

Virginia Beadi, Va. 23452 




LiCAlS 



shown on that plat of survey 
eniillW "Subdivision of 
Parcet 1 of Subdivision of 
Parcels "B" and "C" Far -Go 
Van JUines, inc., for Aspin- 
walls Richards Enter- 
prises/'dafed November 20, 
1971, and recorded in the 
Clerk's Office of ihe Circuit 
Court of Virginia Beach in 
Map Buok 96, at Page 18; 

(2) An easement 5 feet in 
width and 162.12 feet in 
length, covering thai portion 
of f^arcel 1 A which is west of 
the, line with bearing S 07 
degrees 26'01" W which 
consljtytes Ihe boundary of 
Parcel IB to the east and 
Parcel 1 A to the west as 
shown on said plat; and 

(3) The easterly 526.12 toot 
portion (beginning at the 
southeast corner of Parcel 1 
A, thence running N 82 
degree* 33'59" W 526.12 feet 
'o ckpoint, thence running N 

07 degrees 26'0l" E Sfeetfo a 
point, thence running S 82 
degrees 33*59" E 526.12 feet 
appi-oximately to a point, 
ihence running S 16 degrees 
37'11" W 5 leet to point of 
beginning) of an easement 
which is 5 feet in width and 
895.86 feet in length, covering 
Ihe southerly 5 leet of Parcel 
1 A as shown on said plat; 
said portion also constituting 
the easterly 526.12 foot 
portion of an easement 5 feet 
in width and 895.86 feel in 
length covering the southerly 
5 leet of Parcel 1 as shown on 
ihai plat ol survey entitled 
"Subdivision of Parcels "B" 
and "C" Subdivision for Far- 
' Go Van Lines, Inc., Bayside 
Borough, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia for Richard G. 
Maher 8. Patricia J. Maher," 
dalitt: September 18, 1970, 
andrecorded i^ said Clerk's 
Office in Mqp Book 84, at 
Page 35; said portion also 
consfltotinti the easterly 
526.12 toot portion of an 
easement Steel in width and 
895.86 leer jn length, covering 
the southerly 5 feet of Parcel 
"C" as shown on that plat of 
survey entitled "Subdivision 
lor F.ar-Go Van Lines, Inc., 
Bayside Borough, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, dated 
March 18, 1968, and recorded 
n flie said Clerk's Office in 
Map Book 76, at Page 30. 

Said easements to be 
vacated a-e not necessary to 
drain said properties and 
said elements have nol 
been used and are nol 
necessary for overhead and 
underground utilities or any 
public utility installations. 
Richard Webbon 
City Clerk 

5-22,29-2t 

^^^OROER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Vir- 
ginia, 

In th« Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on the 17th 
day of May, 1974. 
Donald Robert Adams, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Nancy Ann Taylor Adams, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa 
Et Thoro from tt»e said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. And 
an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident 
of the state of Virginia, the 
last known post office 
address being c-o Allegheny 
Airlines, 1611 "K" Street, 
N.W. Wash., D.C. It is 
ordered that she do appear 
here within ten (10) days 
after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 
A copy — Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, 
CLERK 

Linda Noel Hill D. Clerk 
James E. Brydges, Jr. 
2413 Pacific" Ave., Va. 
Beach, Va. 

May 22,29— June 5.12 4 1 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on ttie 17th 
day of May, 1974. 
Jule Curtis Harvey, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Linda Campbell Harvey, 
Defendant. 

Theobject of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon tfie 
grounds of continuous and 
uninterrupted separation 
for more than two years. 
And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant Is not a 
resident of tt»e State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
1630 Ogden Avenue, Bronx, 
New York It is ordered that 
she do appear here within 
ten (TO) days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect her interest in this 
suit. 

A copy — Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS: 
CLERK 

BY: Sandra Hargrove D. 
Clerk. 

Alan B. Comess 
5284 Princess Anne Rd. 
Virginia Be^ch, VA 

May 22,29 — JMtieS,12>4t 

ORDER 0F«.^> 
PUBLICATION 
Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the CIfy of 
Virginia Beach, on the 17th 
day of May, 1974. 
Robert L. Thompson, 
PlaintlH, 

against 
Joyce B, Thompson, 
Defendant. 

Theoblect of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of constructive 
desertion. And an affidavit 
having been made and filed 
that the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
VIrglMla. the last known 
post Office address being: 
Head^ivterf Company S- 
3. WM Battalion, Paris 
Island, South Carolina It is 
ordered that she do appear 
here within ten (10) days 
after due publication 
hereof, aitd do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
Interest In this suit. 
A copy — Teste: 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
Linda Noel Hill, D.C. 
Lowell K. Clarke 
5»9 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
VM-ginla Beach, VirgWa 
May M,»— iwW'ltWT 



ORDEI^OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 23rd 
day of April, 1974. 
Barbara J. McClure, 
Plaintiff, 

against , 
Marvin L. McClure, 
Defendant. 

The obfect of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa 
Et Thoro to be later merged 
into a divorce A Vinculo 
Mafrimtnil at the proper 
time from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion on 
January 11, 1974. And an 
affidavit having been made 
and filed that the defendant 
is not a resident of the State 
of Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
U.S.S. Coral Sea CVS 21, 
F.P.O. San Francisco, 
California it is ordered that 
he do appear here withfn 
ten (10) days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect his interest In this 
suit. 

A copy-Teste: JOHN V. 
FENTRESS: CLERK 
BY: Sandra Hargrove O. 
Clerk 

Decker, Zoby, Collias 8. 
Christie 
900 Plaza One 
Norfolk, VA p.q. 

May 22,29— June S,12. 4-t 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
in the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 14th 
day of May, 1974. 
Mamie E. Evans, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
William Leroy Evans, 
Defendant. 

Theoblect of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce from the 
bonds of matrimony from 
the said defendant, upon the 
grounds of adultery. And an 
affidavit having been made 
and filed that the defendant 
is not a resident of the State 
pf Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
AOAN, USN, 451945975, VF- 
11 AO Shop, FPO, N.Y., 
N.Y., 09501 it is ordered that 
he do appear here within 
ten (10) days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect his interest in this 
suit. 

A copy— Teste: JOHN V. 
FENTRESS: CLERK 
BY Sandra Hargrove 
Deputy Clerk. 
Grover C. Wright 
3330 Pacific Ave. 
Virginia Beach, VA 

May22,29— June 5,12 4-t 



NOTICE 

Virginia: 

The regular meeting of 
the Council of the City of 
Virginia Beach will be held 
in the Council Chambers of 
the Administration 
Building, City H»\\, 
Princess Anne Station, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
on Monday, June 3, 1974, at 
2:00 P.M. at which time the 
following applications will 
be heard: 

Change of Zoning District 
Classification: 

VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH 

DEFERRED BY CITY 
COUNCIL FOR A PERIOD 
OF 3 WEEKS ON MAY 13, 
1974: 

1. Petition of A.L. Wood 
by Grover C. Wfifltit, Jr., 
Attorney for a Change of 
Zoning District 
Classification from R-8 
Residential District 
(formerly R-2) to A-4 
Apartment District 
(formerly R-3) on certain 
property located at the 
Northwest corner of Baltic 
Avenue and 25th Street, 
running a distance of 140 
feet along the West side of 
Baltic Avenue, running a 
distance of 100 feet along 
the North side of 25th 
Street, running a distance 
of 140 feet along the 
Western property line and 
running a distance of 100 
feet along the Northern 
property line. Said parcel is 
known as Lots 1, 3, and 5, 
Block 127, Virginia Beach 
Development Company, 
Map No. 6, and contains 
14,000 square feet. 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. . 

Conditional Use Permit: 

2. Application of William 
D. Porter and Kathleen J. 
Hall for a Conditional Use 
Permit to operate a bicycle 
rental in con|unctlon with 
the Sheraton Beach Inn oo 
certain property located on 
the East side of Atlantic 
Avenue on the North side of 
36th Street at Oceanfront. 
Said parcel Is known as a 
part of Lot 1, Block 85, and 
contains 200 square feet. 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

Richard Webbon 

City Clerk 

May 22,29, a-t 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 23rd 
day of April, 1974. 
Robert L, Dowdy, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Audrey Gehrmann Dowdy, 
Defendant, '^i' 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of two year 
separation. And an 
affidavit having been made 
and filed that due diligence 
has been used by or on 
behalf of the Complainant 
to ascertain in which county 
or corporation the 
defendant resides, without 
effect, the last known post 
office address being: 2967 
Talon Court, Va. Beach, VA 
23456, it is ordered that she 
do appear here within ten 
(10) days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary to 
IM'Otect her interest in this 
suit. 

A copy — Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS: 
CLERK 

By: Sandra Hargrove O. 
Clerk. 

Barrow fc Lowe 
3104 Arctic Ave. 
Virginia Beach, VA 

Wy K,lf— Jwwe 5,12,44 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of ^he 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on tite 15th 



day of May, 1974. 
Ernie Alan Yanatovic, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Patricia W. Yanatovic, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of two year 
separation. And an 
affidavit having been made 
and filed that the defendant 
is not a resident of the State 
of Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
9929 East Lower Azusa 
Road, Temple City, 
California 91780 it is 
ordered that she do appear 
here within ten (10) days 
after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 
A copy— Teste: JOHN V. 
FENTRESS: CLERK 
BY: Sandra Hargrove D. 
Clerk 

Harry J. Hicks 
524 Independence Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, VA 

May 22,29— June 5, 12 4-t 



' ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on the 20th 
day of May, 1974. 
Edward Earl Pool, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Ruth Roberts Pool, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce, decree A 
Vinculo AAatrlmonii from the 
said defendant, upon the 
grounds of two (2) year 
separation. And an affidavit 
having been made and filed 
that the defendant is not a 
resident of. the State of 
Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: 1112 
Scranton Place, Durham, 
North Carolina it is ordered 
that she do appear here 
within ten (10) days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect her interest in this 
suit. 

A Copy — Teste: 
BY: Sandra Hargrove D. 
Clerk 

John K. Moore 
2413 Pacific Ave. 
Virginia Beach, VA 

lyAay 22,29— June 5,12-41 



ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 20th 
day of May, 1974. 
Donald Jay Pichinson, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Dorothy Dale Brattoii 
Pichinson, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
thoro from the said defen 
dant upon the grounds of 
desertion. And an affidavit 
having been made and filed 
that the defendant is a non 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: 1212 
Guad^lujse Street, Apt. 803, 
Austin, Texas, it is ordered 
that she do appear here 
within then (10) days after 
due publication hereof, and 
do what may be necessary to 
protect her interest in this 
suit. 

A copy — Teste: John V. 
Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk. 

Adier & Kantor 
706 Plaza One 
Norfolk, Virginia 

May 22,29— June 5,12-4 T 



NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 

The Virginia Beach Board 
of Zoning Appeals will 
conduct a Public Hearing on 
Wednesday, June 5, 1974, at 
7:30 PM. in the court room 
(Traffic Court) adjacent to 
the Building Inspector's 
Office, City Hall, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia.- The 
following applications will 
appear on the agenda. 

PLEASE MAKE NOTE OF 
THE CHANGE OF 

LOCATION. 

1. Robert Edward Zirnheld 
requests a variance of 14 feet 
to a 6 foot setback from U.S. 
Route 13 (Chesapeake Bay 
Bridge Tunnel) instead of 20 
feet as required of Lots 3 & 4, 
Block 11, Chesapeake Shores, 
Coronet Avenue. Bayside 
Borough. 

2. Tidewater Builders, Inc. 
requests a variance of 11 feet 
to a 19 foot setback from 
Little Neck Road instead of 
30 feet as required of Lot 69, 
Section 2, Groveland Park, 
Edinburgh Drive. Lyn 
nhaven Borough. 

3. Tidewater Builders, Inc. 
requests a variance of 2 feet 
to an 8 foot side yard setback 
(western property line) 
instead of 10 feet as required 
of Lot 72, Section 2, 
Groveland Park, Edinburgh 
Drive. Lynnhaven Borough. 

4. Tidewater Builders, Inc. 
requests a varience of 11 feef 
to a 19 foot setback from 
EdintHirgh Drive instead of 
30 feet as required of Lot 97, 
Section 2, Groveland Park, 
Norman Lane. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

5. Tidewater Builders, Inc. 
requests-a variance of 5 feet.^ 

.Jo a J5 foot setback from' 
Beverly Place instead of 30 
feet as required of Lot 134, 
Section 2, Groveland Park, 
Courtney Arch. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

6. Tidewater Builders, Inc. 
requests a variance of 8 feet 
to a 22 foot setback from 
Courtney Arch instead of 30 
feet as required of Lot 136, 
Section 2, Groveland Park, 
Courtney Arch. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

7. Tidewater Builders, Inc. 
requests a variance of 2 feet 
to an 8 foot side yard setback 
(eastern property line) in- 
stead of 10 feet as required of 
Lot 14a, Section 2, Groveland 
Park, Courtney Arch. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

8. Tidewater Builders, Inc. 
requests a variance of 3 feet 
to a 7 foot side yard setback 
(western property line) 
instead of 10 feet as required 
ol Lot 149, Section 2, 
Groveland Park, Cwrtney 
Ar*. Lynnhaven Borow(M«. 

9. Richard L. and Patty J. 
Ctevls request a varlatKecrf 3 
feci to a 7 foot side yard 
setback (eastern propw^ 
line) i«tead of W feet as 
required of Lot 22, Block P, 
Carolanne Farms, Clialledon 
[^ive, Kempsville Borough. 

10. XSmm L. Ci«(*wl«m 



requests a variance of 10 feet 
to a 20 loot setback from 
Kings Point Road instead of 
30 feef as required of Lot 19, 
Block 4, Sectton 9, Windsor 
Woods, 412 Presidential 
Boulevard. —Kempsville 
Borough. 

11. B.M. Stanton requests a 
variance to allow parking 
where prohibited in the 
required 10 foot setback from 
Pacific Avenue, 33rd Street, 
the western property line and 
tt»e 20 foot alley adjoining the 
northern property line and to 
waive the required larKi 
scaping in the setbacks on 
Lot 1, Block 'w, Linkhorn 
Park, northwest corner of 
33rd Street and Pacific 
Avenue. Virginia Beach 
Borougti. 

12. John H. and V*rv P. 
Croft request a variance of 10 
feet to a 10 foot sett>a(:k from 
ISth Street instead of 20 feet 
as required ot Lots 1 & 2, 
Block 101, Lakewood, 15th 
Street and Baltic Avenue. 
Virginia Beach Borough. 

13. L.S. Barco requests a 
variance of 6 feet to a 24 foot 
sett>ack from Milissa Street 
instead ol 30 feet as required 
and a variance of 4 feet to a 6 
foot side yard setback 
(eastern property line) in- 
stead of 10 feet as required of 
Lot 1, Block J, Sherry Park, 
1101 Nolan Street. Kemp 
sville Borou^. 

14. Gary J. and Patricia M. 
Randhahn request a 
variance of 14.4 feet to a 15.6 
foot setback from Thornbury 
Lane instead of 30 feet as 
required of Lot 12, Block E, 
Ridglea, 313 Palmyra Drive. 
Kempsbille Borough. 

15. Carroll W. Kennedy i, 
Associates, Inc. request a 
variance of 4 fett to a 26 foot 
setback ^ from Little Neck 
Road instead of 30 feet as 
required of Lot 1, Section 1,, 
Groveland Park, 3283 Long 
Hill Drive. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

16. Carroll W. Kennedy & 
Associates, Inc. request a 
variance of 20 feet to a 10 foot 
setback from North Lyn- 
nhaven Road insteiid of 30 
feet as required of Lot 13, 
Section 1, Groveland Park, 
454 Cranston Lane. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 

17. Carroll W. Kennedy 8> 
Associates, Inc. request a 
variance of 18 feet to a 12 foot 
setback from North Lyn- 
nhaven Road instead of 30 
feet as required of Lot 14, 
Section 1, Groveland Park, 
453 Cranston Lane. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 

18. Carroll W. Kennedy 8< 
Associates, Inc. request a 
variance of 14 feet to a 16 foot 
setback from North Lyn- 
nhaven Road instead of 30 
feet as required of Lot 33, 
Section 1, Groveland Park, 
362 Courtney Arch. Lyn 
nhaven Borough. 

19. Donald G. Moore 
requests a variance of 10 feet 
to a 20 foot setback from 
Treasure Island Drive in- 
stead of 30 feet as required of 
Lot 4, Block 4, Baylake 
Pines, 4213 John Silver Road. 
Bayside Borough. 

20. Roy L. and Verna J. 
Bartholomew request a 
variance of 15 feet 6 inches to 
a 14 foot 6 inch setback from 
Ballylinn Court instead of 30 
feet as required (detactied 
garage) of Lot F, Block 1, 
Ballylinn Farm, 908 
Ballylinn Road. KempsviHe 
Borough. 

21; Best Construction 
Company requests a 
variance of 1 foot to a 9 foot 
side yard setback (southern 
property line) instead of 10 
feet as required of Lot 43, 
Bayside Acres, 544 Southgate 
Avenue. Bayside Borough. 

22. Marshall B. Cox by 
Freeman 8i Johnson requests 
a variance of 12 feet to an 8 
foot side yard setback 
(northern property line) 
instead of 20 feet as required 
of Lot 41, Little Neck Cove, 
1375 Little Neck Road. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

23. ABM Construction 
Corporation requests a 
variance of 20 feet to a 30 foot 
front yard setback instead of 
50 feet as required of Lot 23, 
Tract C, Section 3, Tract D, 
Section 1, Sandbridge Beach, 
3264 S. Sandfiddler Road. 
Pungo Borough. 

24. ABM Construction 

Corporation requests a 
variance of 20 feet to a 30 foot 
front yard setback instead of 
SO feet as required of Lot 11, 
Tract C, Section 3, Tract D, 
Section 1, Sandbridge Beach, 
3328 S. Sandfiddler Road. 
Pungo Borough. 

25. Lloyd H. Dixon requests 
a variance of 15 feet to a 15 
foot setback from Fox Grove 
Court instead of 30 feet as 
required and a variance of 2 
feet to an 8 foot rear yard 
setback instead of 10 feet as 
required (detached garage) 
of Lot 6, Block I, Section 7, 
Fairfield, 5240 Locke Lane. 
Kempsville Borough. 

26. Cerino Construction 
Corporation requests a 
variance of 10 feet to a 20 foot 
setback from MacGuffie 
Street Instead of 30 feet as 
required of Lot 253, Section 1, 
Brigadoon, 5537 MacGuffie 
Street. Kempsville Borough. 

27. Cerino Construction 
Corporation requests a 
variance of 10 feet to a 20 foot 
setback from MacGuffie 
Street instead of 30 feet as 
required of Lot 259, Section 1, 
Brigadoon, 5529 AAacGuffie 
Street. Kempsville Borough. 

28. Luther McCoy and 
Carol L. Br Hey request a 

' variance of 14 feet to a 16 foot 
front yard setback from Rose 
Marie Avenue Instead of 30 
feet as required (carport) of 
Lot A, Block 7, Araflona 
Village, 401 Rose Marie 
Avenue. Bayside Borough. 

29. Clark Whitehill 
Enterprises, Inc. requests a 
variance of 6 inches to a 9 
foot 6 inch side yard setback 
(western property line) 
instead of W feet as required 
of Lot 2, Block H, Section 2, 
Part 5. Windsor Oaks West, 
3913 Water Oak Lane. 
Kempsville Borough 

30. C.P. Holland, Jr. 
requesH a variance of 10 feet 
to a 10 foot setback from 
Atlantic Averwe and of 5.5 
feet to a 14.5 foot setback 
from 71st Street instead of 20 
feef as required of Lot 1, 
Block 8, Section E, Plat of 
Cape Henry, MO 71sf Street. 
Lyimhaven Borough. 

31. Thonr»as C. Broyles 
requests a variance of 10 feef 
to a "0" sett)ack from Sea 
Pines Road instead of 10 feet 
as required and to allow 
paiUkig wh«-e pn*lblt«J in 
it«e ra«iired 10 foot s^tsack 
on the MStem property \\m 
una to waive the reeiuir«l 
recreational space on Lot J, 
Sea Ptnes, 303 SSth Street 
Virginia Beach Bonui^. 

32 Tem AtaocMMt tov E. 



Bradford Tazewell, Jr. 
requests a variance of 10 feet 
to a 10 foot setback from 
Linkhorn Drive instead of 20 
feet as required (Building 
No. 3) of a parcel of 1.6 acres, 
Grandy Atonskm located at 
420 Linkhorn Drive. Virginia 
Beach Borough. 

33. irvin F. Watts 
requests a variance of 13,5 
feet to a 16.5 foot setback 
from Corvette Lane instead 
of JO feef as required of Lot 1, 
Block tS, Princess Anne 
Plaza, 347 H(»pital Drive. 
Princess Anne Borough. 

34. Arlen Realty Si 
Development Corp, by 
Drucker It Falk, Agents, 
requests a variance of 6 feet 
in fence height to a 10 foot 
fence instead of 4 feet as 
allowed (tennis court) at 
Indian Creek Apartments, 
Level Green, Level Green 
Boulevard. Kempsville 
Borough. 

35. W.W. Reasor 
Enterprises by Eric 
C.Anderson requests a 
variar>ceof 10 feet to a 15 foot 
setback from Virginia 
Beach-Norfolk Expressway 
instead of 25 feet as required 
of Parcel A, S. Witchduck 
Road and Route 44, Euclid, 
Kempsville Borough. 

36. W.K. Widgeon 
requests a variance of 8 feet 
ro a 2 foot rear yard setback 
instead of 10 feet as required 
of Lot 19, Block 26, Pembroke 
Manor, Section 3, 4613 
Jericho Road. Bayside 
Borough. 

ALL APPLICANTS MUST 
APPEAR BEFORE THE 
BOARD. 

PLEASE MAKE NOTE OF 
THE CHANGE OF 

LOCATION. 

W.L. Towers 
Secretary 



ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 13th 
day of May, 1974. 
Dianne Hancock Tompkins, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Samuel Bailey Tompkins, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
of more than two years 
continuous separation. And 
an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the 
defendant is a non-resident of 
the Stale of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: 1505 Old Kings Road, 
Holly Hill, Florida, it is or 
dered that he do appear here 
within ten ( 10) days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what rpay be necessary to 
protect his interest in this 
suit. 

A copy— Teste: 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk. 

Stuart R. Hays 
4310 E. Indian River Road 
Chesapeake, Virginia 

May 1 5,22,29— June 5, 4t. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City df 
Virginia Beach, on the 10th 
day of May, 1974. 
Suzanne M. Schroeder, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Harry William Schroeder, 
Jr., 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
thoro, or should one year 
have elapsed prior to the 
Court receiving a decree 
herein for entry that she be 
granted a divorce a vinculo 
matrinomii from the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
of desertion. And an affidavit 
having been made and filed 
ihat the defendant is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: 15 
Schroeder Lane, Pafchoque, 
New York, it is ordered that 
he do appear here within ten 
(10) days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect his interest in this 
suit. 

A copy— Teste: John V. 
Fentress 

By; J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk 

Gay E. Milius, Jr. 
524 Independence Boulevard 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
May 1S,22,29-Jwwe S— 4t. 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC 
HEARING ON AN 

Application to the U.S. 
Department of Tran- 
sportation for the 
Acquisition, Consolidation, 
Rehabi I i tat ion, and 
Expansion of the Public 
Transportation System in the 
Tidewater Transportation 
District, Composed of the 
Cities of Chesapeake, Nor 
folk, Portsmouth, and 
V^jpihaa Beach. 

I. Notice is hereby given 
that begirwiing on June 10, 
1974, the Tidewater Tran 
sportation District Com 
mission will hold a series of 
public hearings on an ap- 
plication fo tt>e Urban Artass 
Transportation Administ- 
■ratton of the M-S. Depart 
nwnt of Transportation for 
the acquisition," consoli 
datlon, rehabilitation, and 
expanskHi of public Iran 
sporation in th